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My application uses Ruby on Rails ActiveRecord models, which don't allow for composite keys without installing a third-party gem such as composite-primary-keys. Is there a way I can refactor a composite key into a simple key so it will fit this paradigm, or should I bite the bullet and install the gem?

I'm still at the early design stage so I have no data I need to worry about, and I'd like to stay as true to Rails idioms as possible.

I'm creating a recipe database that can list ingredients and instructions in a step-by-step manner. The database schema is similar to the one shown below, and is using composite keys in the Recipe_Steps and Recipe_Step_Ingredients tables (bottom center of image).

Database schema

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You're very likely overthinking and overcomplicating the problem. Stick with the AR idiom of using a single primary key named id.

For join tables use foreign keys instead of compound PKs. Also stick to the naming conventions unless you want to look inept or annoy other devs by violating the principle of least surprise. That means:

  • use snake_case for everything (table names, columns, index names etc.)
  • don't prefix the column with the table name. It just makes every variable in your application longer and is not needed in a ORM.
  • use _id for foreign key columns. ex; parent_id
  • use _at for timestamps. ex; confirmed_at
  • use thing_other_things for join tables unless there is a more descriptive name

Also many of these cases should just use an indirect relation to join up the hierarchy instead of duplicating foreign keys.

This is an example DB schema:

ActiveRecord::Schema.define(version: 20161214013752) do

  # These are extensions that must be enabled in order to support this database
  enable_extension "plpgsql"

  create_table "ingredient_types", force: :cascade do |t|
    t.string   "name"
    t.string   "description"
    t.datetime "created_at",  null: false
    t.datetime "updated_at",  null: false
  end

  create_table "ingredients", force: :cascade do |t|
    t.integer  "ingredient_type_id"
    t.datetime "created_at",         null: false
    t.datetime "updated_at",         null: false
    t.index ["ingredient_type_id"], name: "index_ingredients_on_ingredient_type_id", using: :btree
  end

  create_table "recipe_ingredients", force: :cascade do |t|
    t.integer  "recipe_id"
    t.integer  "ingredient_id"
    t.float    "quantity"
    t.datetime "created_at",    null: false
    t.datetime "updated_at",    null: false
    t.index ["ingredient_id"], name: "index_recipe_ingredients_on_ingredient_id", using: :btree
    t.index ["recipe_id"], name: "index_recipe_ingredients_on_recipe_id", using: :btree
  end

  create_table "steps", force: :cascade do |t|
    t.integer  "recipe_id"
    t.integer  "ordinal"
    t.text     "instruction"
    t.datetime "created_at",   null: false
    t.datetime "updated_at",   null: false
    t.index ["recipe_id"], name: "index_steps_on_recipe_id", using: :btree
  end

  create_table "recipes", force: :cascade do |t|
    t.string   "name"
    t.string   "description"
    t.datetime "created_at",  null: false
    t.datetime "updated_at",  null: false
  end

  add_foreign_key "ingredients", "ingredient_types"
  add_foreign_key "recipe_ingredients", "ingredients"
  add_foreign_key "recipe_ingredients", "recipes"
  add_foreign_key "steps", "recipes"
end

class IngredientType < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :ingredients
end

class Ingredient < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :ingredient_type
  has_many :recipe_ingredients
  has_many :recipes, through: :recipe_ingredients
end

class RecipeIngredient < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :recipe
  belongs_to :ingredient
  has_one :ingredient_type, through: :ingredient
end

class Step < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :recipe
end

class Recipe < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :recipe_ingredients
  has_many :ingredients, through: :recipe_ingredients
  has_many :steps
end
  • This is not my exact schema, I'm just using it as a reference. But these are very good tips. I'm also not an expert SQL database designer... how would you recommend modeling recipe_step_ingredients without using a composite key? A recipe has many steps, and each step can have many ingredients, so I'm having trouble figuring out a simple pattern to use that doesn't involve composite keys. – Mac Sigler Dec 14 '16 at 1:37
  • Its probably just an overcomplication in itself. Do you really need to store the amounts of ingredients on the step and not just as on a join table which joins recipes and ingredients? – max Dec 14 '16 at 1:41
  • Most recipes have the ingredients listed together and then you just write something like mix half the four with the eggs in the steps. KISS. – max Dec 14 '16 at 1:42
  • If I list the amount in the ingredients table, then you have the problem of having a different row for each ingredient/amount combo, e.g. 1 tbsp tomato paste, 2 tbsp. tomato paste, etc. – Mac Sigler Dec 14 '16 at 1:44
  • But why would you have that and not the total? If you want to do stuff like scale recipes after the number of portions its just going to get really messy. – max Dec 14 '16 at 1:50

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