7

Why printf function causes the change of prologue?

C code_1:

#include <cstdio>

int main(){
  int a = 11;
  printf("%d", a);
}

GCC -m32 generated one:

.LC0:
        .string "%d"
main:
        lea     ecx, [esp+4]           // What's purpose of this three
        and     esp, -16               // lines?
        push    DWORD PTR [ecx-4]      // 
        push    ebp
        mov     ebp, esp
        push    ecx
        sub     esp, 20                // why sub 20?
        mov     DWORD PTR [ebp-12], 11
        sub     esp, 8
        push    DWORD PTR [ebp-12]
        push    OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        call    printf
        add     esp, 16
        mov     eax, 0
        mov     ecx, DWORD PTR [ebp-4]
        leave
        lea     esp, [ecx-4]
        ret

C code_2:

#include <cstdio>

int main(){
  int a = 11;
}

GCC -m32:

main:
        push    ebp
        mov     ebp, esp
        sub     esp, 16
        mov     DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 11
        mov     eax, 0
        leave
        ret

What is the purpose of first three lines added in first code? Please, explain first assembly code, if you can.

EDIT:

64-bit mode:

.LC0:
        .string "%d"
main:
        push    rbp
        mov     rbp, rsp
        sub     rsp, 16
        mov     DWORD PTR [rbp-4], 11
        mov     eax, DWORD PTR [rbp-4]
        mov     esi, eax
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        mov     eax, 0
        call    printf
        mov     eax, 0
        leave
        ret
2
  • Maybe the Godbolt-Tool can help you for your analysis.
    – Frodo
    Dec 14, 2016 at 10:39
  • I'm using Godbolt. This assembly is generated on Godbolt :)
    – user7295860
    Dec 14, 2016 at 10:42

1 Answer 1

8

The insight is that the compiler keep the stack aligned at function calls.
The alignment is 16 byte.

lea     ecx, [esp+4]           ;Save original ESP to ECX (ESP+4 actually)
and     esp, -16               ;Align stack on 16 bytes (Lower esp)

push    DWORD PTR [ecx-4]      ;Push main return address (Stack at 16B + 4)
                               ;My guess is to aid debugging tools that expect the RA
                               ;to be at [ebp+04h]
push    ebp
mov     ebp, esp               ;Prolog (Stack at 16B+8)

push    ecx                    ;Save ECX (Original stack pointer) (Stack at 16B+12)

sub     esp, 20                ;Reserve 20 bytes (Stack at 16B+0, ALIGNED AGAIN)
                               ;4 for alignment + 1x16 for a variable (variable space is
                               ;allocated in multiple of 16)

mov     DWORD PTR [ebp-12], 11 ;a = 11

sub     esp, 8                 ;Stack at 16B+8 for later alignment
push    DWORD PTR [ebp-12]     ;a
push    OFFSET FLAT:.LC0       ;"%d"     (Stack at 16B)
call    printf
add     esp, 16                ;Remove args+pad from the stack (Stack at 16B)

mov     eax, 0                 ;Return 0

mov     ecx, DWORD PTR [ebp-4] ;Restore ECX without the need to add to esp
leave                          ;Restore EBP

lea     esp, [ecx-4]           ;Restore original ESP
ret

I don't know why the compiler saves esp+4 in ecx instead of esp (esp+4 is the address of the first parameter of main).

8
  • If this first three line is necessary for save information, why 64-bit code uses the same thing? (view edited post)
    – user7295860
    Dec 14, 2016 at 11:44
  • @J.Doe What same thing? The 64-bit code has a standard prolog. Dec 14, 2016 at 11:52
  • Why 64-bit mode don't saves original ESP as in 32-bit mode?
    – user7295860
    Dec 14, 2016 at 11:56
  • 3
    @J.Doe Because the ABI for 64 bit imposes that at the start of a function the stack is at 16B+8, while for 32 bit this is not true for main. Knowing the initial state of the stack pointer let the compiler omit the and instruction and use instead pushes and arithmetic on rsp. The and is not reversible and thus the original state must be saved. The push/arithmetic is reversible and the original state is restored in the prolog. Dec 14, 2016 at 12:02
  • 1
    @J.Doe Yes, that's the ABI, there should be links to the PDF docs (or you can Google the keywords). 16B+X means an address that is X bytes after a multiple of 16. For example 16B+8 can be 8 (16*0+8) or 24 (16*1+8) or 40 (16*2+8) and so on. Dec 14, 2016 at 12:28

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