53

In MySQL, you can select X random rows with the following statement:

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT X

This does not, however, work in SQLite. Is there an equivalent?

69

For a much better performance use:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE id IN (SELECT id FROM table ORDER BY RANDOM() LIMIT x)

SQL engines first load projected fields of rows to memory then sort them, here we just do a random sort on id field of each row which is in memory because it's indexed, then separate X of them, and find the whole row using these X ids.

So this consume less RAM and CPU as table grows!

  • 1
    Method 2 was significantly faster than the accepted answer. Thanks! – Alex Guerra Aug 3 '16 at 16:08
  • This is brilliant thanks, I've updated the accepted answer :) – Fahad Sadah Jan 10 '17 at 17:17
  • How random is ORDER BY RANDOM()? Because... I do not feel like it is really random... There are seriously a group of rows very frequently chosen... Does not anyone have the same feeling? – GyuHyeon Choi Dec 2 '17 at 15:42
  • @GyuHyeonChoi It's random as much as your CPU is good at creating random numbers! random select 1 row from 3 rows for hundreds of time, you see the chance of any row getting selected is 1/3. – Ali Dec 2 '17 at 19:02
  • Should I always use limit 1 or can I just use fethone using sqlite3 python? – Cookie Feb 24 '19 at 15:31
58

SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY RANDOM() LIMIT X

  • 4
    For the record: this is working, but is slow on larger tables. A faster way (although not quite the same) would be: SELECT * FROM table WHERE random() % k = 0 LIMIT n;. Drawback of this is that records with lower primary keys get higher chance of being selected. Taken from here – ren Mar 9 '14 at 16:08
  • 2
    Yes, it will be slow on big tables as it ends up forcing a table scan. Downside of wanting to do stuff like this in SQL. Best way would be to pick random offsets in your front end. – Donnie May 12 '14 at 18:14
8
SELECT * FROM table ORDER BY RANDOM() LIMIT 1
3

All answers here are based on ORDER BY. This is very inefficient (i.e. unusable) for large sets because you will evaluate RANDOM() for each record, and then ORDER BY which is a resource expensive operation.

An other approach is to place abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/9223372036854775808 < 0.5 in the WHERE clause to get in this case for example 0.5 hit chance.

SELECT *
FROM table
WHERE abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/9223372036854775808 < 0.5

The large number is the maximum absolute number that random() can produce. The abs() is because it is signed. Result is a uniformly distributed random variable between 0 and 1.

This has its drawbacks. You can not guarantee a result and if the threshold is large compared to the table, the selected data will be skewed towards the start of the table. But in some carefully designed situations, it can be a feasible option.

0

This one solves the negative RANDOM integers, and keeps good performance on large datasets:

SELECT * FROM table LIMIT 1 OFFSET abs(random() % (select count(*) from table));

where:
abs(random() % n ) Gives you a positive integer in range(0,n)

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