20

It seems to me that it's a bad idea to have a domain service require an instance of IOptions to pass it configuration. Now I've got pull additional (unnecessary?) dependencies into the library. I've seen lots of examples of injecting IOptions all over the web, but I fail to see the added benefit of it.

Why not just inject that actual POCO into the service?

    services.AddTransient<IConnectionResolver>(x =>
    {
        var appSettings = x.GetService<IOptions<AppSettings>>();

        return new ConnectionResolver(appSettings.Value);
    });

Or even use this mechanism:

        AppSettings appSettings = new AppSettings();

        Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings").Bind(appSettings);

        services.AddTransient<IConnectionResolver>(x =>
        {      
             return new ConnectionResolver(appSettings.SomeValue);
        });

Usage of the settings:

public class MyConnectionResolver 
{
     // Why this?
     public MyConnectionResolver(IOptions<AppSettings> appSettings)
     {
           ... 
     }

     // Why not this?
     public MyConnectionResolver(AppSettings appSettings)
     {
           ... 
     }

     // Or this
     public MyConnectionResolver(IAppSettings appSettings)
     {
           ... 
     }
}

Why the additional dependencies? What does IOptions buy me instead of the old school way of injecting stuff?

  • Because programming to an interface allows you to swap out painlessly down the line. You're able to mock out dummy data for tests. It's minor extra code up front, but the benefits are amazing. If you don't do any of that stuff, you don't have to. Then one day you'll need it to have been an interface, and spend more time rewiring everything. – krillgar Dec 14 '16 at 19:05
  • 5
    I don't accept "Programming to an interface" as a valid reason. This is just a dumb poco that is populated with values from a json file. It's not a domain service, it's not a repository, it has zero behavior and never will. I'm as anal as they come when it comes to DI, this is a poor case. If I wanted to "Program to an interface," I sure as heck wouldn't make a generic wrapper, I'd simply extract an interface from AppSettings. – Darthg8r Dec 14 '16 at 19:18
  • 4
    Good - I'm not the only one who spat the dummy over the dependency on IOptions when creating external libraries. I'm having a related discussion here: stackoverflow.com/a/38573042/201648. To articulate why I have such a problem with IOptions, the library should be completely agnostic of any external DI containers or how they are implemented. Here, we are saying "you use .NET Core DI, therefore you must know about IOptions". Having a dependency on IOptions is therefore a code smell - we should be only ever injecting an Interface or Class that the library defines. – Aaron Newton Feb 19 '17 at 11:59
14

Technically nothing prevents you from registering your POCO classes with ASP.NET Core's Dependency Injection or create a wrapper class and return the IOption<T>.Value from it.

But you will lose the advanced features of the Options package, namely to get them updated automatically when the source changes as you can see in the source here.

As you can see in that code example, if you register your options via services.Configure<AppSettings>(Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings")); it will read and bind the settings from appsettings.json into the model and additionally track it for changes. When appsettings.json is edited, and will rebind the model with the new values as seen here.

Of course you need to decide for yourself, if you want to leak a bit of infrastructure into your domain or pass on the extra features offered by the Microsoft.Extension.Options package. It's a pretty small package which is not tied to ASP.NET Core, so it can be used independent of it.

The Microsoft.Extension.Options package is small enough that it only contains abstractions and the concrete services.Configure overload which for IConfiguration (which is closer tied to how the configuration is obtained, command line, json, environment, azure key vault, etc.) is a separate package.

So all in all, it's dependencies on "infrastructure" is pretty limited.

4

While using IOption is the official way of doing things, I just can't seem to move past the fact that our external libraries shouldn't need to know anything about the DI container or the way it is implemented. IOption seems to violate this concept since we are now telling our class library something about the way the DI container will be injecting settings - we should just be injecting a POCO or interface defined by that class.

This annoyed me badly enough that I've written a utility to inject a POCO into my class library populated with values from an appSettings.json section. Add the following class to your application project:

public static class ConfigurationHelper
{
    public static T GetObjectFromConfigSection<T>(
        this IConfigurationRoot configurationRoot,
        string configSection) where T : new()
    {
        var result = new T();

        foreach (var propInfo in typeof(T).GetProperties())
        {
            var propertyType = propInfo.PropertyType;
            if (propInfo?.CanWrite ?? false)
            {
                var value = Convert.ChangeType(configurationRoot.GetValue<string>($"{configSection}:{propInfo.Name}"), propInfo.PropertyType);
                propInfo.SetValue(result, value, null);
            }
        }

        return result;

    }
}

There's probably some enhancements that could be made, but it worked well when I tested it with simple string and integer values. Here's an example of where I used this in the application project's Startup.cs -> ConfigureServices method for a settings class named DataStoreConfiguration and an appSettings.json section by the same name:

services.AddSingleton<DataStoreConfiguration>((_) =>
    Configuration.GetObjectFromConfigSection<DataStoreConfiguration>("DataStoreConfiguration"));

The appSettings.json config looked something like the following:

{
  "DataStoreConfiguration": {
    "ConnectionString": "Server=Server-goes-here;Database=My-database-name;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true",
    "MeaningOfLifeInt" : "42"
  },
 "AnotherSection" : {
   "Prop1" : "etc."
  }
}

The DataStoreConfiguration class was defined in my library project and looked like the following:

namespace MyLibrary.DataAccessors
{
    public class DataStoreConfiguration
    {
        public string ConnectionString { get; set; }
        public int MeaningOfLifeInt { get; set; }
    }
}

With this application and libraries configuration, I was able to inject a concrete instance of DataStoreConfiguration directly into my library using constructor injection without the IOption wrapper:

using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace MyLibrary.DataAccessors
{
    public class DatabaseConnectionFactory : IDatabaseConnectionFactory
    {

        private readonly DataStoreConfiguration dataStoreConfiguration;

        public DatabaseConnectionFactory(
            DataStoreConfiguration dataStoreConfiguration)
        {
            // Here we inject a concrete instance of DataStoreConfiguration
            // without the `IOption` wrapper.
            this.dataStoreConfiguration = dataStoreConfiguration;
        }

        public SqlConnection NewConnection()
        {
            return new SqlConnection(dataStoreConfiguration.ConnectionString);
        }
    }
}

Decoupling is an important consideration for DI, so I'm not sure why Microsoft have funnelled users into coupling their class libraries to an external dependency like IOptions, no matter how trivial it seems or what benefits it supposedly provides. I would also suggest that some of the benefits of IOptions seem like over-engineering. For example, it allows me to dynamically change configuration and have the changes tracked - I've used three other DI containers which included this feature and I've never used it once... Meanwhile, I can virtually guarantee you that teams will want to inject POCO classes or interfaces into libraries for their settings to replace ConfigurationManager, and seasoned developers will not be happy about an extraneous wrapper interface. I hope a utility similar to what I have described here is included in future versions of ASP.NET Core OR that someone provides me with a convincing argument for why I'm wrong.

  • 1
    While using IOption is the official way of doing things, I just can't seem to move past the fact that our external libraries shouldn't need to know anything about the DI container <-- couldnt agree more - pulling my hair out trying to remove the dependency on crappy IOptions – wal Mar 24 '17 at 6:59
  • @Aaron Newton... Also do not like the IOptions solution so I tried yours. I am getting an error in StartUp.cs...services.AddSingleton<EmailConfiguration>((_) => ConfigurationHelper.GetSettingsFromAppSettingsJson<EmailConfiguration>("EmailConfiguration")); where EmailConfiguration is the class defined in my class library. Error is "There is no argument given that corresponds to the required formal parameter 'configSection' of 'ConfigurationHelper.GetSettingsFromAppSettingsJson<T>(IConfigurationRoot, string)' – dinotom Oct 9 '17 at 9:13
  • Additionally ... My utility method identical to yours other than the name and its in a configuration helper class. I am using .Net Core 2.0, is there any difference in this adaption between 1.1 and 2.0? It seems that the compiler is looking for an IConfiguration not an IConfigurationRoot...'IConfiguration' does not contain a definition for 'GetObjectFromConfigSection' and no extension method 'GetObjectFromConfigSection' accepting a first argument of type 'IConfiguration' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) – dinotom Oct 9 '17 at 9:14
  • I haven't tried .NET Core 2.0, but I can still see IConfigurationRoot in the documentation: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/…. It sounds like the utility can't find the EmailCon‌​figuration section of your appSettings.config. – Aaron Newton Oct 9 '17 at 21:54
1

I can't stand the IOptions recommendation either. It's a crappy design to force this on developers. IOptions should be clearly documented as optional, oh the irony.

This is what I do for my configuraition values

var mySettings = new MySettings();
Configuration.GetSection("Key").Bind(mySettings);

services.AddTransient(p => new MyService(mySettings));

You retain strong typing and don't need need to use IOptions in your services/libraries.

  • 1
    Not sure what you mean about IOptions not being optional. It's a helper, it's not a requirement; proved by the very fact that you're not using it in your answer. – Rob Jan 25 '18 at 4:27
  • Perhaps it was just my impression from the documentation, when I read it. I think IConfiguration.Get<>() and IConfiguration.Bind() are by far 2 most common ways to use configuration and should deserve more attention in the docs. – Kugel Jan 29 '18 at 3:22
  • The possible way to avoid dependency of IOptions is to use extension TConfig ConfigurePOCO<TConfig>(this IServiceCollection services, IConfiguration configuration), as suggested in strathweb.com/2016/09/… – Michael Freidgeim Dec 23 '18 at 12:50

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