3

How can one check if a given string is a cyclic rotation of another given string in R? Ex: 1234 is a cyclic rotation of 3412 by two shifts. But I'd like to check if a string is cyclically equivalent to another string or not, by any number of shifts whatsoever.

  • Not sure how robust it could be, but you could try replicating each vector and grepl the other, alternatively -- grepl(y, strrep(x, 2)) || grepl(x, strrep(y, 2)) – alexis_laz Dec 15 '16 at 8:47
  • @alexis_laz Nice! Wouldn't a check of nchar be sufficient for your first suggestion? nchar(x) == nchar(y) & grepl(pattern = y, x = strrep(x, 2)). Care to post an answer? – Henrik Dec 17 '16 at 16:33
3

Accomodating Henrik's comment, testing (i) for nchar equality and (ii) if one vector is part of the other after replicating the second, seems to be sufficient:

ff = function(x, y) (nchar(y) == nchar(x)) && (grepl(y, strrep(x, 2), fixed = TRUE))

ff("3412", "1234")
#[1] TRUE
  • That's a good one! Duplicating the string is the key and letting the regex engine do all the work. Much better than creating all possible cyclic rotations on your own. – Uwe Dec 18 '16 at 11:55
  • @UweBlock : I think the main drawback here, appears if "x" is very large and strrep cannot allocate the needed memory – alexis_laz Dec 18 '16 at 12:27
  • Available memory might not be the first limit being reached. ?"Memory-limits" says The number of bytes in a character string is limited to 2^31 - 1 ~ 2*10^9. So, if y has the maximum length then x can only have half the bytes. In total, x and y may have a maximum of 3*10^9 bytes which roughly translates to 3 GB of memory. Perhaps, unicode may require more memory but available memory is probably not the show stopper for your approach. – Uwe Dec 18 '16 at 12:50
2

You can just generate successive rotations until you find a match. If none of the rotations match, then the strings are not cyclic rotations of one another. Solution using sub:

cycrotT = function(s1,s2) {
  if (nchar(s1)!=nchar(s2)) {
    return(FALSE) }
  for (i in 1:nchar(s2)) {
    if (s1==s2) {
      return(TRUE) }
    # Move the first character to the end of the string
    s2 = sub('(.)(.*)', '\\2\\1', s2)
  }
  return(FALSE)
}


> cycrotT("1234567", "1324567")
# [1] FALSE
> cycrotT("1234567", "4567123")
# [1] TRUE
> cycrotT("1234567", "1234568")
# [1] FALSE
  • Seems to pass all the tests so far but suffers from being code-only. Put in an explanation and it will be upvote-worthy. – 42- Dec 15 '16 at 18:53
1

A longer, but perhaps clearer picture of a way to do this:

cyclic_index <- function(string1, string2) {

  ## gather info about the first string
  chars <- el(strsplit(string1, ""))
  length <- length(chars)
  vec <- seq_len(length)

  ## create a matrix of possible permutations
  permutations <- data.frame(matrix(NA, nrow = length, ncol = length + 1))
  names(permutations) <- c("id", paste0("index", vec))

  permutations$id <- vec

  ## calculate the offset indices
  for (r in vec)
    permutations[r, vec + 1] <- (vec + r - 1) %% (length)

  ## a %% a = 0 so reset this to a
  permutations[permutations == 0] <- length

  ## change from indices to characters
  permutations[ , vec + 1] <- sapply(vec, function(x) chars[unlist(permutations[x, vec + 1])])

  ## paste the characters back into strings
  permutations$string <- sapply(vec, function(x) paste0(permutations[x , vec + 1], collapse = ''))

  ## if string2 is a permutation of string1, return TRUE
  return(string2 %in% permutations$string)

}

cyclic_index("jonocarroll", "carrolljono")
#> TRUE

cyclic_index("jonocarroll", "callorrjono")
#> FALSE

cyclic_index("1234567", "4567123")
#> TRUE

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.