3

I have a spring controller that uses annotations. I gave this controller a constructor that takes two arguments. I want both ways of initializing the controller: constructor injection and setter injection.

@Controller("viewQuestionController")
@RequestMapping("/public/viewQuestions")
public class ViewQuestionController
{
    @Resource(name="questionService")
    private QuestionService questionService;

   /*public ViewQuestionController()
 {
    int i=0;
    i++;
 } 
   */   

public ViewQuestionController(@Qualifier("questionService") QuestionService questionService)
{
    this.questionService = questionService;
}

@Resource(name="questionService")
public void setQuestionService(QuestionService questionService)
{
    this.questionService = questionService;
}
}   

When I uncomment the default constructor, the controller is initiated correctly. However, if I don't, I get a BeanInstantiationException, No default constructor found; nested exception is java.lang.NoSuchMethodException. So, is my configuration for the annotated constructor wrong or does a completely annotated controller in spring always need a default constructor?

2 Answers 2

4

If you want to configure constructor injection via annotations, you need to put the corresponding annotation on the constructor. I'm not sure how it can be done with @Resource, but @Autowired and @Inject support it:

@Autowired
public ViewQuestionController(@Qualifier("questionService") QuestionService questionService) 

or

@Inject
public ViewQuestionController(@Named("questionService") QuestionService questionService) 
3
  • Thanks, the first option of using @Autowired worked. I did not try @Inject, because that requires putting another jar in the app. I think I'll look at setter injection with @Resource later on. Nov 7, 2010 at 15:01
  • I think in the case of the Question, with the class annotated with @ Controller, annotating the Constructor with @ Autowired is not necessary, although it doesn't hurt? If I'm right, the autowiring on the constructor happens automatically from @ Controller.
    – cellepo
    Jun 27, 2018 at 23:33
  • 1
    @cellepo You are right... since Spring 4.3, the Autowired annotation is optional when the bean has only one constructor. docs.spring.io/spring/docs/4.3.x/spring-framework-reference/…
    – Øyvind Mo
    Aug 14, 2019 at 11:51
1

I think Controller beans need a default constructor as they are initialized by the framework but there is no way to tell the framework hot to provide the dependency.

On second thought why not you autowire your question service and Spring will take care of it. The following code should be good

 @Controller("viewQuestionController")
 @RequestMapping("/public/viewQuestions")
 public class ViewQuestionController
 {
       @Autowired
       private QuestionService questionService;

       //Not providing any constructor would also be fine
       public ViewQuestionController(){}

questionService will be initialized properly by Spring

2
  • 2
    I'm trying to avoid simple autowiring, I want the name of the dependency to be mentioned when I inject it. I've heard that simple autowiring is not recommended when a project grows bigger in size. Nov 7, 2010 at 9:54
  • I have worked with decently large projects with simple auto wiring and it works fine. In fact the same philosophy is promoted by JavaEE standards also with the @Resource annotation and adopting convention over configuration. It was true in pure XML way that autowiring used to be difficult to manage in terms of understanding projects, but with annotations and with the configuration sitting at class level, the autowiring is a better choice.
    – lalit
    Nov 7, 2010 at 13:00

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