I have a StreamReader object that I initialized with a stream, now I want to save this stream to disk (the stream may be a .gif or .jpg or .pdf).

Existing Code:

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(myOtherObject.InputStream);
  1. I need to save this to disk (I have the filename).
  2. In the future I may want to store this to SQL Server.

I have the encoding type also, which I will need if I store it to SQL Server, correct?

As highlighted by Tilendor in Jon Skeet's answer, streams have a CopyTo method since .NET 4.

var fileStream = File.Create("C:\\Path\\To\\File");
myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
myOtherObject.InputStream.CopyTo(fileStream);
fileStream.Close();

Or with the using syntax:

using (var fileStream = File.Create("C:\\Path\\To\\File"))
{
    myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    myOtherObject.InputStream.CopyTo(fileStream);
}
  • 56
    Note that you have to call myOtherObject.InputStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin) if you're not already at the beginning or you won't copy the entire stream. – Steve Rukuts Mar 22 '12 at 12:00
  • 3
    If this input stream is got from http connection then will it buffer and download and then write all the bytes from the source????? – dbw Jan 4 '14 at 14:16
  • 2
    I have created PDF viewer where I am using stream, once I bind the stream and when I save the pdf file using the same stream then without using "Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin)" I wont be able to save correct document. so +1 for mentioning this "Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin)" – user2463514 Mar 6 '14 at 12:28
  • myOtherObject.InputStream.CopyTo(fileStream); this line gives an error: access denied. – sulhadin Jun 29 '16 at 13:05
  • @sulhadin that just means that you don't have permission to write on fileStream – Antoine Leclair Jun 29 '16 at 17:05

You must not use StreamReader for binary files (like gifs or jpgs). StreamReader is for text data. You will almost certainly lose data if you use it for arbitrary binary data. (If you use Encoding.GetEncoding(28591) you will probably be okay, but what's the point?)

Why do you need to use a StreamReader at all? Why not just keep the binary data as binary data and write it back to disk (or SQL) as binary data?

EDIT: As this seems to be something people want to see... if you do just want to copy one stream to another (e.g. to a file) use something like this:

/// <summary>
/// Copies the contents of input to output. Doesn't close either stream.
/// </summary>
public static void CopyStream(Stream input, Stream output)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8 * 1024];
    int len;
    while ( (len = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        output.Write(buffer, 0, len);
    }    
}

To use it to dump a stream to a file, for example:

using (Stream file = File.Create(filename))
{
    CopyStream(input, file);
}

Note that Stream.CopyTo was introduced in .NET 4, serving basically the same purpose.

  • 5
    This seems like such a common case I'm surprised its not in .NET. I see people creating byte arrays the size of the entire file, which can cause problems for big files. – Tilendor Dec 7 '10 at 17:00
  • 75
    @Tilendor: It's present as an extension method in .NET 4. (CopyTo) – Jon Skeet Dec 7 '10 at 17:17
  • 28
    I don't think it is an extension method, but it's new in Stream class. – Kugel Jan 24 '11 at 21:43
  • 7
    @Kugel: You're right, sorry. I had it as an extension method in a utility library, but now that it's in Stream itself, my extension method doesn't get called. – Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 22:02
  • 4
    @Florian: It's reasonably arbitrary - a small enough value to avoid taking too much memory, and large enough to transfer a reasonable chunk at a time. It would be fine to be 16K, 32K maybe - I'd just be careful not to end up on the large object heap. – Jon Skeet Oct 2 '13 at 16:53
public void CopyStream(Stream stream, string destPath)
{
  using (var fileStream = new FileStream(destPath, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write))
  {
    stream.CopyTo(fileStream);
  }
}
  • 20
    You probably shouldn't put the stream object in the using(){} bracket. Your method didn't create the stream, so it shouldn't dispose of it. – LarsTech Aug 1 '13 at 21:16
  • 2
    Instead you need to put FileStream instead to using, otherwise it will be kept open until it is garbage collected. – Pavel Chikulaev Jan 16 '14 at 23:55
  • I've found that your approach was much closer to solve my problem in WinForms with my AWS S3 class gateway class! thank you! – Luiz Eduardo Jun 3 '15 at 18:06
  • This ran fine but I got a 0 KB output. Instead I had to do this for the correct output: File.WriteAllBytes(destinationFilePath, input.ToArray());. In my case, input is a MemoryStream coming from within a ZipArchive. – SNag Jan 10 '16 at 1:50
  • 1
    This works well in my MVC controller action method. – kimbaudi Oct 6 '16 at 16:52
private void SaveFileStream(String path, Stream stream)
{
    var fileStream = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write);
    stream.CopyTo(fileStream);
    fileStream.Dispose();
}
  • This ran fine but I got a 0 KB output. Instead I had to do this for the correct output: File.WriteAllBytes(destinationFilePath, input.ToArray());. In my case, input is a MemoryStream coming from within a ZipArchive. – SNag Jan 10 '16 at 1:50
  • 2
    This helped me figure out what I was doing wrong. However, don't forget to move to the beginning of the stream: stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin); – Nathan Bills Aug 8 '16 at 22:06
//If you don't have .Net 4.0  :)

public void SaveStreamToFile(Stream stream, string filename)
{  
   using(Stream destination = File.Create(filename))
      Write(stream, destination);
}

//Typically I implement this Write method as a Stream extension method. 
//The framework handles buffering.

public void Write(Stream from, Stream to)
{
   for(int a = from.ReadByte(); a != -1; a = from.ReadByte())
      to.WriteByte( (byte) a );
}

/*
Note, StreamReader is an IEnumerable<Char> while Stream is an IEnumbable<byte>.
The distinction is significant such as in multiple byte character encodings 
like Unicode used in .Net where Char is one or more bytes (byte[n]). Also, the
resulting translation from IEnumerable<byte> to IEnumerable<Char> can loose bytes
or insert them (for example, "\n" vs. "\r\n") depending on the StreamReader instance
CurrentEncoding.
*/
  • 16
    Copying a stream byte-by-byte (using ReadByte/WriteByte) will be much slower than copying buffer-by-buffer (using Read(byte[], int, int)/Write(byte[], int,int)). – Kevin Aug 10 '11 at 3:10

Why not use a FileStream object?

public void SaveStreamToFile(string fileFullPath, Stream stream)
{
    if (stream.Length == 0) return;

    // Create a FileStream object to write a stream to a file
    using (FileStream fileStream = System.IO.File.Create(fileFullPath, (int)stream.Length))
    {
        // Fill the bytes[] array with the stream data
        byte[] bytesInStream = new byte[stream.Length];
        stream.Read(bytesInStream, 0, (int)bytesInStream.Length);

        // Use FileStream object to write to the specified file
        fileStream.Write(bytesInStream, 0, bytesInStream.Length);
     }
}
  • 45
    what if the input stream is 1GB long - this code would try to allocate 1GB buffer :) – Buthrakaur Jun 30 '11 at 7:56
  • 4
    Buthrakaur is right -- this answer should be deleted. – Frank Hileman May 23 '13 at 21:08
  • 1
    This is not working with ResponseStream, because it is of uknown length. – qub1n Oct 18 '13 at 10:31
  • While it's true you'd have to have the memory available for the byte[], I think it would be rare that you'd be streaming a 1 GB+ blob to a file...unless you have a site that keeps DVD torrents... Plus, most computers have at least 2 GB of RAM available these days, anyway....Caveat is valid, but I think this is a case where it's probably "good enough" for most jobs. – vapcguy Oct 12 '16 at 20:50
  • Webservers won't tolerate a case like this very well at all, unless the website only has a single user active at once. – NateTheGreatt Oct 3 '17 at 21:28

I don't get all of the answers using CopyTo, where maybe the systems using the app might not have been upgraded to .NET 4.0+. I know some would like to force people to upgrade, but compatibility is also nice, too.

Another thing, I don't get using a stream to copy from another stream in the first place. Why not just do:

byte[] bytes = myOtherObject.InputStream.ToArray();

Once you have the bytes, you can easily write them to a file:

public static void WriteFile(string fileName, byte[] bytes)
{
    string path = Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);
    if (!path.EndsWith(@"\")) path += @"\";

    if (File.Exists(Path.Combine(path, fileName)))
        File.Delete(Path.Combine(path, fileName));

    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(Path.Combine(path, fileName), FileMode.CreateNew, FileAccess.Write)
    {
        fs.Write(bytes, 0, (int)bytes.Length);
        fs.Close();
    }
}

This code works as I've tested it with a .jpg file, though I admit I have only used it with small files (less than 1 MB). One stream, no copying between streams, no encoding needed, just write the bytes! No need to over-complicate things with StreamReader if you already have a stream you can convert to bytes directly with .ToArray()!

Only potential downsides I can see in doing it this way is if there's a large file you have, having it as a stream and using .CopyTo() or equivalent allows FileStream to stream it instead of using a byte array and reading the bytes one by one. It might be slower doing it this way, as a result. But it shouldn't choke since the .Write() method of the FileStream handles writing the bytes, and it's only doing it one byte at a time, so it won't clog memory, except that you will have to have enough memory to hold the stream as a byte[] object. In my situation where I used this, getting an OracleBlob, I had to go to a byte[], it was small enough, and besides, there was no streaming available to me, anyway, so I just sent my bytes to my function, above.

Another option, using a stream, would be to use it with Jon Skeet's CopyStream function that was in another post - this just uses FileStream to take the input stream and create the file from it directly. It does not use File.Create, like he did (which initially seemed to be problematic for me, but later found it was likely just a VS bug...).

/// <summary>
/// Copies the contents of input to output. Doesn't close either stream.
/// </summary>
public static void CopyStream(Stream input, Stream output)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[8 * 1024];
    int len;
    while ( (len = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        output.Write(buffer, 0, len);
    }    
}

public static void WriteFile(string fileName, Stream inputStream)
{
    string path = Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location);
    if (!path.EndsWith(@"\")) path += @"\";

    if (File.Exists(Path.Combine(path, fileName)))
        File.Delete(Path.Combine(path, fileName));

    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(Path.Combine(path, fileName), FileMode.CreateNew, FileAccess.Write)
    {
        CopyStream(inputStream, fs);
    }

    inputStream.Close();
    inputStream.Flush();
}
  • 1
    No need to call Close because of using() – Alex78191 Jun 25 '17 at 13:07
  • @Alex78191 If you're talking about inputStream.Close(), look again - inputStream is sent in as a variable. The using is on the path+filename output stream. If you were talking about fs.Close() in the middle of the using, sorry, you were correct about that and I removed that. – vapcguy Jul 19 '17 at 15:52
public void testdownload(stream input)
{
    byte[] buffer = new byte[16345];
    using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(this.FullLocalFilePath,
                        FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write, FileShare.None))
    {
        int read;
        while ((read = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
        {
             fs.Write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
    }
}
  • Supplying a buffered input stream directly to the FileStream - nice! – vapcguy Oct 12 '16 at 20:55

Another option is to get the stream to a byte[] and use File.WriteAllBytes. This should do:

using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    input.CopyTo(stream);
    File.WriteAllBytes(file, stream.ToArray());
}

Wrapping it in an extension method gives it better naming:

public void WriteTo(this Stream input, string file)
{
    //your fav write method:

    using (var stream = File.Create(file))
    {
        input.CopyTo(stream);
    }

    //or

    using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        input.CopyTo(stream);
        File.WriteAllBytes(file, stream.ToArray());
    }

    //whatever that fits.
}
  • 3
    If the input is too large you'll get an out of memory exception. The option of copying content from the input stream to a filestream is much better – Ykok Sep 4 '15 at 11:02

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