8

I'm working on an algorithm which can generate 2 types of recommendations, restaurants and dishes. All of this works fine, but I wanted to merge these 2 types of recommendations in a single list, which is where I encountered some issues. From my previous question I concluded that I needed a wrapper class, which I have set up like this:

public class RecommenderItem
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public object Entity { get; set; }
}

Now I want to alternate the 2 types of recommendations so the list would look like this:

[Restaurant][Dish][Restaurant][Dish][Restaurant][Dish] //Etc...

Note that these recommendations are completely separate. They are generated purely based on the user's preference, and they have no correlation in between them. My product owner wants to show these recommendations on the home page of our app like this.

These lists are different in length, so if I have added all items from a list, I wanted to just add the remaining objects from the other list. A possible scenario of this could look like this:

/*Other objects before this...*/[Dish][Restaurant][Dish][Dish][Dish] //Etc...

Here did the list of restaurant objects run out and I just wanted to add the remaining dish recommendations at the end of the list.

I have gotten this far, but I'm unsure how I would catch an IndexOutOfBounds exception and add the rest of the remaining objects at the end.

public List<RecommenderItem> GetMergedRecommendationLists(List<Restaurant> restaurantRecommendations, 
                                                           List<Dish> dishRecommendations)
    {
        //Setting up the output list.
        List<RecommenderItem> output = new List<RecommenderItem>();
        int count = 0;
        //Check which list is longer and use that count
        if (restaurantRecommendations.Count > dishRecommendations.Count)
            count = dishRecommendations.Count;
        else
            count = restaurantRecommendations.Count;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            //I'm fully aware this isn't the most optimal way of doing this,
            //but I'm only looking at functionality here, optimizing performance comes later.
            var restRecommendation = restaurantRecommendations[i];
            var dishRecommendation = dishRecommendations[i];
            output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
            {
                Id = restRecommendation.Id,
                Entity = restRecommendation
            });
            output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
            {
                Id = dishRecommendation.Id,
                Entity = dishRecommendation
            });
        }

        return output;
    }

Does anyone have an idea how I could do this? Could I just catch an IndexOutOfBounds exception and use .AddRange() for the remaining objects? I'm not sure how I could check which list was out of bounds.

Let me know if I should elaborate more and thanks in advance!

Edit: -removed because it wasn't fair.-

11
  • 2
    Did you check the Enumerable.Zip? Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 8:40
  • @JeroenvanLangen My knowledge in C# is fairly limited, how would I use that in my scenario?
    – user4189129
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 8:41
  • Instead of object Entity i would have a Restaurant class and a Dish class, a resurant has a List<Dish> as property. If you now want to recommend a dish for every restaurant that means you want to fill a List<Restaurant> where the List<Dish> is filled with one dish. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 8:43
  • @TimSchmelter my product owner wants it this way though. These restaurants and dishes are completely separate and have no correlation in between them. I'll add that description to the question.
    – user4189129
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 8:44
  • 1
    The fundamentally important answer is probably from @m.rogalski, since that is the one that has allowed a much simpler solution to work. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 10:26

6 Answers 6

15

This is a fairly succinct way of doing this.

While not Linq, it works in the spirit of the way Linq works by deferring doing any work until the resulting sequence is enumerated:

public static IEnumerable<RecommenderItem> Merge(IEnumerable<Restaurant> restaurants, IEnumerable<Dish> dishes)
{
    using (var r = restaurants.GetEnumerator())
    using (var d = dishes.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (true)
        {
            bool rAvailable = r.MoveNext();
            bool dAvailable = d.MoveNext();

            if (rAvailable)
                yield return new RecommenderItem { Id = r.Current.Id, Entity = r.Current };

            if (dAvailable)
                yield return new RecommenderItem { Id = d.Current.Id, Entity = d.Current };

            if (!rAvailable && !dAvailable)
                break;
        }
    }
}

If you happen to be using the MoreLinq NuGet package that includes the ZipLongest extension method, you can use the following simplified implementation instead:

public static IEnumerable<RecommenderItem> Merge(IEnumerable<Restaurant> restaurants, IEnumerable<Dish> dishes)
{
    foreach (var item in restaurants.ZipLongest(dishes, (r, d) => new { r, d }))
    {
        if (item.r != null)
            yield return new RecommenderItem { Id = item.r.Id, Entity = item.r };

        if (item.d != null)
            yield return new RecommenderItem { Id = item.d.Id, Entity = item.d };
    }
}

Addendum

As @InBetween posted in his answer, you can put the interleaving logic into an extension method. Here's my version; it's substantially the same, except I've added a small optimisation to avoid calling .MoveNext() when its not necessary:

public static class EnumerableExt
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Interleave<T>(this IEnumerable<T> a, IEnumerable<T> b)
    {
        using (var ae = a.GetEnumerator())
        using (var be = b.GetEnumerator())
        {
            bool aAvailable = true;
            bool bAvailable = true;

            while (aAvailable || bAvailable)
            {
                aAvailable = aAvailable && ae.MoveNext();
                bAvailable = bAvailable && be.MoveNext();

                if (aAvailable)
                    yield return ae.Current;

                if (bAvailable)
                    yield return be.Current;
            }
        }
    }
}

Once you have that, I realised that you don't need to write an implict operator. Instead, you can just convert the two sequences to the resultant type before calling Interleave() like so:

var restaurantsAsRecommenderItems = 
    restaurantRecommendations
    .Select(r => new RecommenderItem {Id = r.Id, Entity = r});

var dishesAsRecommenderItems = 
    dishRecommendations
    .Select(d => new RecommenderItem {Id = d.Id, Entity = d});

var result =
    restaurantsAsRecommenderItems
    .Interleave(dishesAsRecommenderItems)
    .ToList();
4
  • I have just tested this, but it doesn't add the remaining objects once one of the two lists is empty.
    – user4189129
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:12
  • @Bas Ah, I misunderstood your requirement, which says i just wanted to dump the rest of the dish recommendations at the end of the list.. I took dump to mean discard but you really mean concatenate I assume. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:13
  • Yes, I'm sorry, I meant it that you need to dump the remaining objects at the end of the list. I'll word it differently.
    – user4189129
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:15
  • This is my favourite, uses deferred execution and is still efficient and readable Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:24
8

My recommendation would be to just make simple implicit operator :

public static implicit operator RecommenderItem(Restaurant restaurant) {
    return new RecommenderItem { Id = restaurant.Id, Entity = restaurant };
}

Then you have possibility to convert these types easily like :

Restaurant rest = //...
RecommenderItem rItem = rest; // here the implicit operator is called

After doing this you can just use one for loop :

int count = Math.Max(restaurantRecommendations.Count, dishRecommendations.Count);
for ( int i = 0; i < count; i++ ) {
    if ( i < restRecommendations.Count )
        output.Add(restRecommendations[i]);

    if ( i < dishRecommendations.Count )
        output.Add(dishRecommendations[i]);
}

This will make your work much more easier.

3
  • 3
    Well, you need also one from Dish to RecommenderItem. Personally i don't like such magic conversions because they are hidden to all who aren't so familiar with the classes. But nice idea anyway. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 11:26
  • Well.. i thought that was obvious. Same like you should make opposite operators ( from RecommenderItem to Restaurant )
    – mrogal.ski
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 11:28
  • Only do this is both clases are in the same domain, otherwise you'll need a reference to the other assembly in order to compile the first.
    – BanksySan
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 11:34
6

Well, there are probably more elegant LINQ solutions but you have already most, it's also a very efficient approach:

public List<RecommenderItem> GetMergedRecommendationLists(List<Restaurant> restaurantRecommendations, List<Dish> dishRecommendations)
{
    //Setting up the output list.
    List<RecommenderItem> output = new List<RecommenderItem>();
    int count = Math.Min(restaurantRecommendations.Count, dishRecommendations.Count);
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        var restRecommendation = restaurantRecommendations[i];
        var dishRecommendation = dishRecommendations[i];
        output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
        {
            Id = restRecommendation.Id,
            Entity = restRecommendation
        });
        output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
        {
            Id = dishRecommendation.Id,
            Entity = dishRecommendation
        });
    }
    int remainingRestaurant = restaurantRecommendations.Count - count;
    int remainingDishes = dishRecommendations.Count - count;
    if (remainingRestaurant > 0)
    {
        for (int i = count; i < restaurantRecommendations.Count; i++)
        {
            var restRecommendation = restaurantRecommendations[i];
            output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
            {
                Id = restRecommendation.Id,
                Entity = restRecommendation
            });
        }
    }
    else if (remainingDishes > 0)
    {
        for (int i = count; i < dishRecommendations.Count; i++)
        {
            var dishRecommendation = dishRecommendations[i];
            output.Add(new RecommenderItem()
            {
                Id = dishRecommendation.Id,
                Entity = dishRecommendation
            });
        }
    }

    return output;
}
6
  • Would this be more efficient than using LINQ or any of the above answers? I'll benchmark them all, it would just save me some time ^^
    – user4189129
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:17
  • @Bas: this is the most efficient approach because it is based on simple math and a for-loop that uses the list indexer. But performance is not most important. Use code that you (and your colleagues) understand, so that you can find bugs or maintain it. Loop based approaches have another advantage: thery are easy to debug and you can add logging and error handling easily. Btw, i'm a great LINQ fan ;-) Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 9:20
  • Wouldn't this output duplicates (starting from 0) instead of the remaining items? Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 12:42
  • No, still not right. You want i to go from count to restaurantRecommendations.Count - 1 and dishRecommendations.Count - 1. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 13:57
  • @KlitosKyriacou: that's the reason why i like Mathew's answer. No indexes or claculation needed Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 14:06
5

A simple way of doing it would be:

public static IEnumerable<T> Merge<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
{
    using (var firstEnumerator = first.GetEnumerator())
    using (var secondEnumerator = second.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (firstEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
           yield return firstEnumerator.Current;

            if (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
            }
        }

        while (secondEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return secondEnumerator.Current;
        }
    }
}
2
  • This works well and does what it's supposed to, but I needed to concentrate in order to understand it, because the source code is not "symmetric" between first and second argument. Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 13:04
  • @KlitosKyriacou Very true. The answer was more intended in showing a simple algorithm the merges both lists as required. Mathew's answer, which is essentially the same as mine, addreses the type assymetry.
    – InBetween
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 13:08
2

After having created two arrays of restaurants and dishes of the same type RecommenderItem, you can use the Zip method like :

var restaurants = restaurantRecommendations.Select(x => new RecommenderItem {
                                                        Id = x.Id,
                                                        Entity = x 
                                                     }).ToArray();
var dishes = dishRecommendations.Select(x => new RecommenderItem {
                                                        Id = x.Id,
                                                        Entity = x 
                                                     }).ToArray();
var output = restaurants.Zip(dishes, (r, d) => new[] { r, d })
              .SelectMany(r => r).Concat(dishes.Skip(restaurants.Length))
              .Concat(restaurants.Skip(dishes.Length));
0

Restaraunt and Dish would have to share a base type:

restaurantRecommendations.Select(item => new RecommenderItem()
        {
            Id = item.Id,
            Entity = item
        });
dishRecommendations.Select(item => new RecommenderItem()
        {
            Id = item.Id,
            Entity = item
        });

Once that's the case you could use something like this slightly modified version of Zip (from System.Linq):

    private static IEnumerable<T> ZipThrough<T>(IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
    {
        if (first == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(first));
        if (second == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(second));
        using (var e1 = first.GetEnumerator())
        {
            using (var e2 = second.GetEnumerator())
            {
                while (true)
                    if (e1.MoveNext())
                    {
                        yield return e1.Current;

                        if (e2.MoveNext()) yield return e2.Current;
                    }
                    else if (e2.MoveNext())
                    {
                        yield return e2.Current;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        break;
                    }
            }
        }
    }

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