I have a piece of code that works using

my_surface = pygame.image.load('some_image.png')

This returns a pygame surface. I'd like to use the same code everywhere else but instead pass in a numpy array. (Actually, I'm going to have an if statement that determines whether we have an array or a path to an image. In either case the function has to return the same type of object, a pygame surface. It already works using the above code. Now I have to add a second way of generating the same object if the script is being used differently.) I have tried using

my_surface = pygame.pixelcopy.make_surface(my_array)

but the problem is that this function requires an INTEGER array. My array is a float32. I can force it through by passing the array like so

(my_array*10000).astype(int)

But when I display it later it looks like garbage (imagine my surprise). So my question is, how do we create a pygame surface elegantly out of a numpy array of floats?

  • pygame may expect pixel as single value 0-255 or tuple (0-255, 0-255, 0-255). If you use different values then it can round them to 0-255. – furas Dec 15 '16 at 18:04
  • @furas Yes. It's not super clear what the make_surface function is expecting. All the documentation says is "Create a new Surface that best resembles the data and format of the array. The array can be 2D or 3D with any sized integer values." When I get a chance I'll try scaling the array to 0-255 and see how make_surface reacts. Still, it seems like there should be a more straight-forward way that I just don't know about, similar to how imshow() just works on arrays. – onjre Dec 15 '16 at 18:56
  • 1
    there is function to convert surface to array - maybe try it and see what array you get and you will see what array is used by pygame. – furas Dec 15 '16 at 19:01
  • 1
    I think you should provide info about what is in your float32 array, namely what each float value represents and what shape has it. Otherwise it is very hard to guess what you want to achieve. – Mikhail V Dec 20 '16 at 3:34
  • @MikhailV It's just a 2D array of numbers generally ranging from 0-1 but not exclusively (I have seen some negative values). The values are proportional to the number of electrons incident on a detector plus shot noise and possibly other spurious signals (like xrays). The goal is to generate a pygame surface that represents the array, akin to how cv2.imshow(my_array) works without complaint. The surface is later blit to the screen for mouse interaction. – onjre Dec 20 '16 at 22:45
up vote 6 down vote accepted

convert data range to range[0-255], the data size must be mxn or mxnx3

pygame.init()
display = pygame.display.set_mode((350, 350))
x = np.arange(0, 300)
y = np.arange(0, 300)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)
Z = X + Y
Z = 255*Z/Z.max()
surf = pygame.surfarray.make_surface(Z)

running = True

while running:
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            running = False
    display.blit(surf, (0, 0))
    pygame.display.update()
pygame.quit()

enter image description here

If you want in grayscale:

import pygame
import numpy as np


def gray(im):
    im = 255 * (im / im.max())
    w, h = im.shape
    ret = np.empty((w, h, 3), dtype=np.uint8)
    ret[:, :, 2] = ret[:, :, 1] = ret[:, :, 0] = im
    return ret

pygame.init()
display = pygame.display.set_mode((350, 350))
x = np.arange(0, 300)
y = np.arange(0, 300)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)
Z = X + Y
Z = 255 * Z / Z.max()
Z = gray(Z)
surf = pygame.surfarray.make_surface(Z)

running = True

while running:
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            running = False
    display.blit(surf, (0, 0))
    pygame.display.update()
pygame.quit()

enter image description here

  • This worked like a charm! So it looks like make_surface uses mxnx3 to distinguish RGB values stored in the third dimension? Then you're just setting them to the same values in your gray() function to "force" make_surface to display them grayscale. I have to admit, that's super clever! And you solved not only getting the array to a surface but getting it grayscale too. – onjre Dec 15 '16 at 19:34
  • Important to always read EVENTs in pygame, if not you can get blank/gray screen, also between sessions. Just read and don't do anything with them if you are not using them. In other words, always include this: "for event in pygame.event.get():" – Punnerud Oct 15 at 13:23

Let's say for simplicity you have only values [0,1], otherwize it is better to truncate values to a fixed range, so that by some float value, e.g. 0,5 you have always same color output.
I'll take simple horizontal gradient as input example:

W = 300
H = 200
# generate simple gradient in float
F0 = numpy.linspace(0, 1, num = W)
F = numpy.tile(F0, (H, 1))

Now there are couple of ways to show it up. I would probaby in this case show it on 8 bit surface. In this case you'll need this to define the color palette in Pygame format:

def make_palette (C1, C2):
    palR = numpy.linspace(C1[0], C2[0], num = 256, dtype = "uint8")
    palG = numpy.linspace(C1[1], C2[1], num = 256, dtype = "uint8")
    palB = numpy.linspace(C1[2], C2[2], num = 256, dtype = "uint8")
    return zip(palR,palG,palB)

And this to copy data from array to surface:

def put_arr(Dest, Src):                 
    buf = Dest.get_buffer()
    buf.write(Src.tostring(), 0)

Now in the beginning of the program you initialize the surface of the same size as you array and apply palette:

I_surf = pygame.Surface((W, H), 0, 8)           # Pygame surface 
C1 = (0,0,250)
C2 = (250,0,0)
palRGB = make_palette (C1, C2)
I_surf.set_palette(palRGB)

And in the main loop you have something like:

I = numpy.rint( F*255 ).astype("uint8")
put_arr(I_surf, I)
...
DISPLAY.blit(I_surf, (100, 100))

Note the type of array and surface, they both must be 8 bit in this case.
If all works, you must see this in the window:

enter image description here

This is a supplement to eyllanesc's answer, since I found that answer's examples helpful, but they can be optimised slightly if you want to update the image.

The main optimisations are to use an 8-bit array, and to use surfarray.blit_array instead of blit and display.flip instead of display.update. (The latter two require the display and the array to be the same size.)

The difference is not huge, however - the code below gets me about 15 fps without the optimisations and 20-21 fps with them. An OpenGL based method would be much faster, but I don't know a convenient library for that.

import pygame
import numpy as np
from pygame import surfarray

from timeit import default_timer as timer

pygame.init()

w = 1000
h = 800

display = pygame.display.set_mode((w, h))

img = np.zeros((w,h,3),dtype=np.uint8)


init_time = timer()
frames_displayed = 0

running = True
while running:
    for event in pygame.event.get():
        if event.type == pygame.QUIT:
            running = False

    # updating the image
    for i in range(100):
        img[np.random.randint(w),np.random.randint(h)] = np.random.randint(255,size=3,dtype=np.uint8)

    surfarray.blit_array(display, img)
    pygame.display.flip()

    frames_displayed+=1


print("average frame rate:", frames_displayed/(timer()-init_time), "fps")

pygame.quit()

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