-3

I am a newbie to C and it took me 2 hours to figure out the problem.

void helper(char* a, char* b){
    a = malloc(strlen(b));
    memcpy(a, b, strlen(b));
    printf("%s %s\n", a, b);
}

int main(){
    char* b = "hello";
    char* a;
    helper(a, b);
    printf("%s", a);
}

While a is always null. Is there anything I missed?

5
  • 5
    helper(a, b); does not change a. Need something like a = helper(b); (BTW, need allocation space for the null character too) – chux - Reinstate Monica Dec 16 '16 at 0:25
  • What is the problem that you are having? – Clarus Dec 16 '16 at 0:25
  • 1
    this is a common problem. C is pass by value, and helper doesn't change a on exit. So, you need to change helper to be like this: void helper(char** a, char* b), and the rest of your code to handle the extra level of indirection – bruceg Dec 16 '16 at 0:27
  • Change to like this – BLUEPIXY Dec 16 '16 at 0:35
  • What is null? You mean null pointer or "equals the macro NULL"? – too honest for this site Dec 16 '16 at 0:49
1

You didnt change a inside the function. when you did malloc a received new address.

void helper(char **a,  char *b){
    *a = malloc(strlen(b)+1); //+1 for the \0 in the end of b
    strcpy(*a, b);
    printf("%s %s\n", *a, b);
}

int main(void){
    char *b = "hello";
    char *a;
    helper(&a, b);
    printf("%s\n", a);
   }

And in you code you didnt use free.. You have to free all the pointers that you did malloc...

so add free(a) in the end of the main.

1
  • Thanks. I now understand c is copying value for argument! – curiousYY Dec 16 '16 at 0:47
4

In main(), a and b are pointers.

helper(a, b); gives a copy of pointer a and a copy of pointer b to helper() as part of the call to helper().

The function completes.

The a in main() is not updated/changed by the call helper(a, b). Neither is b changed.


Code needs a new approach of which there are several good ones. Example: Use the return value of helper2().

char *helper2(const char *source);

int main(void) {
  const char* b = "hello";
  char* a = helper2(b);
  printf("<%s>", a);
  free(a);
}

Now create helper2(). Code template follows:

#include <...>      // whats includes are needed.
#include <...>      
char *helper2(const char *source) {
  size_t size_needed = ....; // length + 1 for the null character
  char *destination = ...'   // allocate
  if (destination ...) {     // Successful allocation? 
    memcpy(destination, ...., ...); // copy - include null character
  }
  return ...                        // What should be returned here?
}  
3

You've missed the fact that main() passes a copy of a to helper() by value. So the a in helper() is a completely different variable (even though you've given it the same name) - it has a different address.

The change of a in helper() therefore does not affect the a in main() at all.

Regardless of what helper() does, main() exhibits undefined behaviour. a is uninitialised, so passing its value to helper() gives undefined behaviour. Passing it to printf() gives undefined behaviour for the same reason.

The printf() call in helper() also has undefined behaviour, since %s causes printf() to expect a string terminated by a '\0', but the memcpy() call has not copied such a thing to a. Practically, printf() will probably keep stepping from a through random memory until it happens to find a byte with zero value. This may result in garbage output or (if there is no such byte in memory) an obscure program crash.

A partial fix of your code would be to make the change of a in helper() visible to main(). For example;

/*   Danger:  This code still has undefined behaviour */

void helper(char **a, char* b)
    /*  note usage of extra * on every usage of a in this function  */
{
    *a = malloc(strlen(b));
    memcpy(*a, b, strlen(b));
    printf("%s %s\n", *a, b);
}

int main()
{
    char* b = "hello";
    char* a;
    helper(&a, b);      /*  note use of ampersand here */
    printf("%s", a);
    free(a);            /*  a has been malloc()ed, so free() it */

       /*  using a here will give undefined behaviour, since it is free()d  */
}

This code makes the changes to a in helper() visible to main(), by use of pointers.

The problem with this partially fixed code code is that %s still causes printf to expect that a to be terminated with a trailing '\0', but the memcpy() does not copy such a trailing '\0'. So both printf() calls (in both helper() and main()) still have undefined behaviour.

To fix this, we need to change helper() to

void helper(char **a, char* b)
{
    *a = malloc(strlen(b) + 1);
    memcpy(*a, b, strlen(b) + 1);
    printf("%s %s\n", *a, b);
}

which allocates a larger buffer, and copies the content of b - with its contained '\0' into that additional length.

An alternative is to use strcpy() instead of memcpy().

void helper(char **a, char* b)
{
    *a = malloc(strlen(b) + 1);
    strcpy(*a, b);
    printf("%s %s\n", *a, b);
}

The only difference is that strcpy() copies characters until it finds the trailing '\0' in b.

0

I renamed variables, to be clear. What @chux said, is value of variable 'a' changed, but value of variable 'x' - not.

void helper(char* a, char* b){
    a = malloc(strlen(b));
    memcpy(a, b, strlen(b));
    printf("%s %s\n", a, b);
}

int main(){
    char* y = "hello";
    char* x;
    helper(x, y);
    printf("%s", x);
}

UPD: This is an original code. I just renamed variables in order to disambiguate variables naming, and to do explanations more clear. The problem, as it was pointed by @chux, variable x sent by value, and so cannot be changed in function main.

4
  • @David Bowling, it should be a comment, but I can't post a comment with code. It will bad formatted. I see here a common problem, that new programmers use same names for different variables, and this confuse them. This is also make explanations too hard. – user2900180 Dec 16 '16 at 0:48
  • @downvoted, I see. But this guy sent char pointer by value and expect it to be changed. I answered this point. – user2900180 Dec 16 '16 at 0:49
  • @BorisT-- that is a good point. You should revise this into a true answer. Maybe the downvote will be reversed. – ad absurdum Dec 16 '16 at 0:55
  • @David Bowling - thank you. I updated text. English is my problem (hope temporary). Sorry. – user2900180 Dec 16 '16 at 1:21
0

First mistake I saw is that you have ever to allocate strlen(foo)+1. the correct size for copy a string is this. Than call strcpy() or memset +1 . But with strings I ever use strcpy() on my mind is more performant:

  char *strcpy(char *a , const char*b)
  {
       while(*a++=*b++)
                   ;
       return a;
  }

then (this is a very trivial version, the real one has more checks)

  char * memcpy(a,b,n)
   {
       while(n--)
       *a++=*b++;
       return a;
   }

there is a counter more to decrease; With memset you have also to call strlen() for get the length, and add one. With strcpy() is not required. So yes, the differences are not appreciable, but there are, but what is appreciable is the redeability, the clearness of the code all this with (teorethical, unless some compiler optimization) better performance

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