8

I'm a newbie to golang, trying to rewrite my java server project in golang.

I found, passing pointers into channel cause almost 30% performance drop compared to passing values.

Here is a sample snippet: package main import ( "time" "fmt" )

var c = make(chan t, 1024)
// var c = make(chan *t, 1024)
type t struct {
    a uint
    b uint
}

func main() {

    start := time.Now()
    for i := 0; i < 1000; i++ {
        b := t{a:3, b:5}
        // c <- &b
        c <- b
    }
    elapsed := time.Since(start)
    fmt.Println(t2)
}

update. fix the package missing

2
  • 1
    How did you calculate? And ho define "performance drop"? I'm a little confused about the relation between the values 4000, 8000, and 30%.
    – Wolf
    Dec 16, 2016 at 8:47
  • The problem is not the performance of a channel, because it's the same, instead the question should be Why is the performance impacted when I get a pointer from a local variable? and Martin gave a good example about that.
    – Motakjuq
    Dec 16, 2016 at 9:37

2 Answers 2

15

As a value it can be stack allocated:

go run -gcflags '-m' tmp.go
# command-line-arguments
./tmp.go:18: inlining call to time.Time.Nanosecond
./tmp.go:24: inlining call to time.Time.Nanosecond
./tmp.go:25: t2 escapes to heap
./tmp.go:25: main ... argument does not escape
63613

As a pointer, it escapes to the heap:

go run -gcflags '-m' tmp.go
# command-line-arguments
./tmp.go:18: inlining call to time.Time.Nanosecond
./tmp.go:24: inlining call to time.Time.Nanosecond
./tmp.go:21: &b escapes to heap <-- Additional GC pressure
./tmp.go:20: moved to heap: b   <-- 
./tmp.go:25: t2 escapes to heap
./tmp.go:25: main ... argument does not escape
122513

Escaping to the heap introduces some overhead / GC pressure.

Looking at the assembly, the pointer version also introduces additional instructions, including:

go run -gcflags '-S' tmp.go
0x0055 00085 (...tmp.go:18) CALL    runtime.newobject(SB)

The non-pointer variant doesn't incur this overhead before calling runtime.chansend1.

4
  • Would you expect a 30% percent performance drop or a fixed value per passing operation?
    – Wolf
    Dec 16, 2016 at 8:35
  • 1
    In most cases no, but the above code is a contrived example where the heap allocations and additional assembly instructions are a large proportion of the programs' execution. Dec 16, 2016 at 8:55
  • I'd expect the heap operations to be much more expansive then the referencing and dereferencing instructions, but since you have had the look into the code you maybe know better...
    – Wolf
    Dec 16, 2016 at 9:00
  • 1
    Good analysis, hope this answer will be the accepted one. And it shows some really interesting applications of the go tools go run -gcflags '-m' and go run -gcflags '-S
    – Wolf
    Dec 16, 2016 at 11:11
1

As a supplement to the good analysis of Martin Gallagher, it must be added that the way you are measuring is suspicious. The performance of such tiny programs varies a lot, so measuring should be done repeatedly. There are also some mistakes in your example.

First: it doesn't compile because the package statement is missing.

Second: there is an important difference between Nanoseconds and Nanosecond

I tried to evaluate your observation this way*:

package main

import (
    "time"
    "fmt"
)

const (
    chan_size = 1000
    cycle_count = 1000
)

var (
    v_ch = make(chan t, chan_size)
    p_ch = make(chan *t, chan_size)
)

type t struct {
    a uint
    b uint
}

func fill_v() {
    for i := 0; i < chan_size; i++ {
        b := t{a:3, b:5}
        v_ch <- b
    }
}

func fill_p() {
    for i := 0; i < chan_size; i++ {
        b := t{a:3, b:5}
        p_ch <- &b
    }
}

func measure_f(f func()) int64 {
    start := time.Now()
    f();
    elapsed := time.Since(start)
    return elapsed.Nanoseconds()
}

func main() {

    var v_nanos int64 = 0
    var p_nanos int64 = 0
    for i := 0; i<cycle_count; i++ {
        v_nanos += measure_f(fill_v);
        for i := 0; i < chan_size; i++ {
            _ = <- v_ch
        }
    }
    for i := 0; i<cycle_count; i++ {
        p_nanos += measure_f(fill_p);
        for i := 0; i < chan_size; i++ {
            _ = <- p_ch
        }
    }
    fmt.Println(
        "v:",v_nanos/cycle_count, 
        " p:", p_nanos/cycle_count, 
        "ratio (v/p):", float64(v_nanos)/float64(p_nanos))
}

There is indeed a measurable performance drop (I define drop like this drop=1-(candidate/optimum)), but although I repeat the code 1000 times, it varies between 25% and 50%, I'm not even sure how the heap is recycled and when, so it maybe hard to quantify at all.


*see a "running" demo on ideone

...note that stdout is frozen: v: 34875 p: 59420 ratio (v/p)0.586923845267128

For some reason, it was not possible to run this code in the Go Playground

5
  • 1
    Regarding Go Playground issues; that's because time.Now() always returns 2009-11-10 23:00:00 +0000 UTC Dec 16, 2016 at 11:47
  • 1
    @MartinGallagher On the Go Playground time always starts at 2009-11-10 23:00:00, but the time is not frozen, if you call time.Now() at a later time, it returns a different value: time test.
    – icza
    Dec 16, 2016 at 12:07
  • @icza maybe you need to sleep for that? My performance test obviously absolutely consumed no time in Go. But in reality it does, you wait longer with bigger values for chan_size or cycle_count
    – Wolf
    Dec 16, 2016 at 13:01
  • @icza; sorry I forgot to add context: play.golang.org/p/yi_2L6g0C3 Dec 16, 2016 at 13:10
  • 2
    @MartinGallagher Yes, the Playground uses "fake timing". It doesn't advance by itself, and sleeps are just simulated by "jumps" in time. You can read more about it here: Inside the Go Playground: Faking time
    – icza
    Dec 16, 2016 at 13:15

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