0

Why:

We were discussing with colleague composite keys. The fact that Mysql requires sequential use of indexed columns in where clause without gaps to be used by planner. I wanted to show how Postgres uses second column in composite key for scan. And I failed! It was using first column, but not the second! Totally confused I played some and found it starts using the second column when index is 6.5 times smaller then table:

populate:

create table so2 (a int not null,b int not null, c text, d int not null);
with l as (select generate_series(999,999+76,1) r) 
insert into so2
select l.r,l.r+1,concat('l',lpad('o',l.r,'o'),'ng'),1 from l;
;
alter table so2 ADD CONSTRAINT so2pk PRIMARY KEY (a,b);
analyze so2;

the plan that confused me:

t=# explain analyze select 42 from so2 where a=1004;
                                                   QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Index Only Scan using so2pk on so2  (cost=0.14..8.16 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.013..0.013 rows=1 loops=1)
   Index Cond: (a = 1004)
   Heap Fetches: 1
 Planning time: 0.090 ms
 Execution time: 0.026 ms
(5 rows)

t=# explain analyze select 42 from so2 where b=1004;
                                          QUERY PLAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on so2  (cost=0.00..11.96 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.006..0.028 rows=1 loops=1)
   Filter: (b = 1004)
   Rows Removed by Filter: 76
 Planning time: 0.045 ms
 Execution time: 0.036 ms
(5 rows)

Then I drop so2 and rerun prepare part with 999+77, not 999+76 and plan for column b changes:

t=# explain analyze select 42 from so2 where b=1004;
                                                   QUERY PLAN
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Index Only Scan using so2pk on so2  (cost=0.14..12.74 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.004..0.004 rows=1 loops=1)
   Index Cond: (b = 1004)
   Heap Fetches: 1
 Planning time: 0.038 ms
 Execution time: 0.013 ms
(5 rows)

The only difference I noticed is amount of pages the relation takes:

confusing plan' size:

t=# \dt+ so2
                  List of relations
 Schema | Name | Type  | Owner |  Size  | Description
--------+------+-------+-------+--------+-------------
 public | so2  | table | vao   | 120 kB |
(1 row)

expected one's size:

t=# \dt+ so2
                  List of relations
 Schema | Name | Type  | Owner |  Size  | Description
--------+------+-------+-------+--------+-------------
 public | so2  | table | vao   | 128 kB |
(1 row)

Index in both case is same:

t=# \di+ so2pk
                      List of relations
 Schema | Name  | Type  | Owner | Table | Size  | Description
--------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------+-------------
 public | so2pk | index | vao   | so2   | 16 kB |
(1 row)

Settings that could affect plan are default:

select name,setting
from pg_settings
where source != 'default' and name in (
'enable_bitmapscan',
'enable_hashagg',
'enable_hashjoin',
'enable_indexscan',
'enable_indexonlyscan',
'enable_material',
'enable_mergejoin',
'enable_nestloop',
'enable_seqscan',
'enable_sort',
'enable_tidscan',
'seq_page_cost',
'random_page_cost',
'cpu_tuple_cost',
'cpu_index_tuple_cost',
'cpu_operator_cost',
'effective_cache_size',
'geqo',
'geqo_threshold',
'geqo_effort',
'geqo_pool_size',
'geqo_generations',
'geqo_selection_bias',
'geqo_seed',
'join_collapse_limit',
'from_collapse_limit',
'cursor_tuple_fraction',
'constraint_exclusion',
'default_statistics_target'
) order by name
;
 name | setting
------+---------
(0 rows)

tried in several versions: 9.3.10, 9.5.4 with same behaviour

Now - excuse me for such long post! And questions:

  1. 16kB is smaller then 120kB - why would planner choose Seq Scan?..

UPDATED to reflect e4c5 kend remarks

Also: For a second I thought it could be because text column is kept in extended stoprage so the table itself takes same amount of pages as index (all columns but text one), so I altered it to be main and plain - no effect...

1

I think the key difference here is the fact that mysql can only use one index per table where as postgresql does not have that limitation. More than one index can be used that's perhaps why they say

Multicolumn indexes should be used sparingly. In most situations, an index on a single column is sufficient and saves space and time. Indexes with more than three columns are unlikely to be helpful unless the usage of the table is extremely stylized.

A few other pointers

1) You have far too little data to reach any conclusion. yes, the query plan does depend a great deal on size - the number of rows in the table. The first stored function creates only 62 rows and for that you don't need an index.

2) The value that you are search for a=4 is not in the table.

3) the value for b is always one, so an index on that column would be useless. Even a composite index wouldn't give it very high cardinality. ie a composite index on (a,b) is exactly the same as an index on a

Update

There is no line in the sand threshold at number of rows or which size in KB an index becomes effective. Query planner decides whether or not to use an index and what index to use based on several configuration factors described at https://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/runtime-config-query.html

  • thank you very much for your remarks. changed code to select existing row (exact carnality) and updated all depending code and output. Sorry for taking your time on points two and three. Now after eliminating those silly mistakes of mine - I very much wonder what is the threshold to involve index - could you please extend your point one? – Vao Tsun Dec 16 '16 at 13:48
  • n=62 to n=72 that make no differencce. you should try numbers like 7000. – e4c5 Dec 16 '16 at 14:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.