1

Consider the following code in python:

a = 10
def fun():
    print(a)
fun()

This works fine in ipython notebook, the output is 10.

Consider this code in c++:

#include <iostream>

void fun()  {
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

int main()  {
    int a = 10;
    fun();
    return 0;
}

When compiling, the error is:

compare-fun.cpp: In function ‘void fun()’:
compare-fun.cpp:4:18: error: ‘a’ was not declared in this scope
     std::cout << a << std::endl;

I am confused about the python code, why can it call a even if a is not defined in fun?

8
  • 11
    That C++ code is not equivalent to the Python code. The equivalent Python code would result in the equivalent error. Dec 16, 2016 at 17:29
  • 1
    Because you allowed to use global variables, but you must explicit make them global to modify them. Dec 16, 2016 at 17:29
  • 1
    Not hard to test this in Python, 'a' in globals() will return True Dec 16, 2016 at 17:30
  • 3
    declaring a in scope, i.e. above fun() and in the global scope would be equivalent.
    – George
    Dec 16, 2016 at 17:32
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the OP assertion/assumption that the C++ code is equivalent to the Python code is incorrect.
    – martineau
    Dec 16, 2016 at 17:45

6 Answers 6

8

The equivalent python code to your C++ code is actually the following:

def fun():
    print(a)

def main():
    a = 10
    fun()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

This, when run, produces the following:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test1.py", line 9, in <module>
    main()
  File "test1.py", line 6, in main
    fun()
  File "test1.py", line 2, in fun
    print(a)
NameError: global name 'a' is not defined

The equivalent C++ code to your Python code is this:

#include <iostream>

int a = 10;

void fun()  {
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

int main()  {
    fun();
    return 0;
}

This, when run, outputs 10.

4

In python, all objects are treated equally. You can argue that this is or is not a good design decision, but that's how it is (and likely how it always will be) so let's accept that as an axiom.

Lets look at some code that python should want to support:

def bar(val):
    return val + 6

def foo(a):
    return bar(a * 2)

We want bar to be useable within the function foo, but in order to allow that, we need to allow any other object defined at a higher level in the scope hierarchy to also be available since we want to treat all objects equally.

Also note that this is actually a very useful property of python as it allows doing interesting things with closures:

def add_constant(constant):
    def add(value):
        return value + constant
    return add

add_3 = add_constant(3)
assert add_3(6) == 9

Also note that the following is an error (and is more like the c++ code that you posted):

def func():
    print a

def main():
    a = 10
    func()  # NameError!

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

And the reason that this doesn't work is because the scope of func doens't have access to the scope where a was defined (main) since func's scope isn't a child of main's scope.

1

Those 2 codes are not equivalent.

In Python you are defining the variable in a global scope, in C++ not. If you change your code in C++ to this, it should work in a similar way:

#include <iostream>
int a = 10;
void fun()  {
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

int main()  {
    fun();
    return 0;
}

To understand more about the scope in Python check here.

A variable which is defined in the main body of a file is called a global variable. It will be visible throughout the file, and also inside any file which imports that file. Global variables can have unintended consequences because of their wide-ranging effects – that is why we should almost never use them. Only objects which are intended to be used globally, like functions and classes, should be put in the global namespace.

The concept is very similar in C++

A scope is a region of the program and broadly speaking there are three places, where variables can be declared −

Inside a function or a block which is called local variables,

In the definition of function parameters which is called formal parameters.

Outside of all functions which is called global variables.

1
  • If I define python code in` __main__`, maybe the compiler will give the same error? Can you add that part? Dec 16, 2016 at 17:38
1

In your Python example, you can use(not call) a inside the function fun() because a was defined in the global scope. This means a is accessible throughout your entire program.

But as Ignacio has already told you in the comments, you two examples are not equivalent. In your C++ example, a is not defined in the global scope, but in the scope of main(). This means that void fun() has no way of knowing where a is defined, thus, an error is thrown. Your C++ example would work fine if you defined a in the global scope:

#include <iostream>

int a = 10;

void fun()  {
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
}

int main()  {
    fun();
    return 0;
}

That is why your C++ example threw an error, while your Python example did not. You defined a inside a scope void fun() knew nothing about. As others have already shown, creating the equivalent code in Python to your original C++ example would also raise an error.

0

The scope of a Python variable is determined by where it has been defined. If a variable has been defined outside of a function or class, it is global. Otherwise, it is local, unless declared global. More on this topic: http://www.python-course.eu/python3_global_vs_local_variables.php

1
0

a is a global variable, so you can use it in the procedure.

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