14

It is well-known that one cannot have a member of the type you're defining:

class Foo {
    Foo member;
};

The reason is that this is an infinitely recursive, infinitely large object. However, we can have static members:

class Foo {
    static Foo member;
};

We can do this because Foo is acting like a namespace; instances of Foo do not contain .member, so there's no infinite reference. Put another way, .member belongs to the class, not to the instance. What I would like to do is very similar:

class Foo {
    class Bar {
        Foo member;
    };
};

Once again, Foo is acting like a namespace. Instances of Foo are actually empty. I would have to make a non-static field Bar Foo::bar; to start getting layout issues. Unfortunately, my compilers disagree (e.g. GCC):

<source>:3:14: error: field 'member' has incomplete type 'Foo'
Foo member;
^~~~~~

For what technical reason is this not allowed?

5
  • 4
    acting like a namespace - No it is nothing like a namespace. Namespaces do not store data. static Foo and Foo member does
    – Ed Heal
    Dec 17 '16 at 11:29
  • as you can do with static you can with references and this this is what happens with copy constructor
    – Raindrop7
    Dec 17 '16 at 12:10
  • I'm confused why you would want to do this in the first place.. I could understand a member like Foo* but wouldn't any of these suggested non-static declarations make sizeof(Foo) infinite? I don't see how that could even be possible to compile Dec 17 '16 at 12:54
  • 2
    @PatrickRoberts: The 3rd code block only defines a nested class, without using it. Foo doesn't have any members of type Foo or Bar. As the answers point out, this is possible to achieve, just not with that syntax. (IDK why you'd want it, though, but it's a reasonable question to help understand why C++'s rules are designed the way they are.) Dec 17 '16 at 18:14
  • @PeterCordes thank you for the clarification Dec 17 '16 at 19:48
21

Long story short, it was easier to disallow this than to allow.

Here is an example that shows what could be difficult about it: C++ lets you combine nested class definition with a member declaration, like this:

class Foo {
    class Bar {
        Foo member;
    } bar; // <<== Here
};

It is clear why this definition must be disallowed: unlike a class definition which could have been OK, member definition makes size computation impossible.

Of course the writers of the standard could have allowed class definitions to pass, at the expense of giving compiler writers additional work. However, it looks like they decided that allowing this feature is not worth the trouble, so they didn't make it an exception from the requirement of the class to be complete at the point of declaring an instance.

2
  • 2
    Off-topic: thanks (and some upvotes) for the very helpful comment on that empty-line printing thing!
    – GhostCat
    Dec 17 '16 at 13:14
  • @GhostCat You are welcome! I saw your edit, it makes perfect sense. Good job spotting that empty line, too! Dec 17 '16 at 15:00
19

There is nothing wrong with what you what to do, and you can do so with different syntax.

Since the compiler wants to determine the size of class Bar, it needs to know the size of class Foo, But Foo's definition is not yet complete (The source code has not been entirely parsed by the compiler). The definition of Foo must be completed before using it in Bar.

Instead try forward declaring Bar inside Foo, then completing the definition of Bar after Foo, This way the size of Foo can be determined for use in Bar.

class Foo {
    class Bar;
};
class Foo::Bar {
  Foo member;
};
2
  • 1
    it doesn't address what the OP asks.
    – Raindrop7
    Dec 17 '16 at 12:04
  • 8
    OP asked "For what technical reason is this not allowed?" I made it very clear that it was related to determining the size of a class. Since Foo's definition was incomplete, the size of Foo could not be determined, so it can not be used inside Bar. Dec 17 '16 at 12:07
6

It's not allowed because you can't define a class with a member with an incomplete type, period. At the end of the class definition the class becomes complete and that is only possible if the sizes of all of its members are known.

For example, you get the same error, for the same reason, without nesting classes like this:

class Foo;
class Bar {
    Foo member;
};

Sure, in your example the language could defer completing the definition of Foo::Bar until Foo is defined, but this would be inconsistent with how classes are defined generally. You'd have the weird behaviour of Foo::Bar being incomplete at a point in the source code after it was fully defined.

0

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