13

I understand this has something to do with the way processors treat overflows, but I fail to see it. Multiplication with different negative numbers gives either zero or -2^63:

In C# Interactive:

> return unchecked (-1L * -9223372036854775808L);
-9223372036854775808
> return unchecked (-2L * -9223372036854775808L);
0
> return unchecked (-3L * -9223372036854775808L);
-9223372036854775808
> return unchecked (-4L * -9223372036854775808L);
0
> return unchecked (-5L * -9223372036854775808L);
-9223372036854775808

In F# Interactive:

> -1L * -9223372036854775808L;;
val it : int64 = -9223372036854775808L
> -2L * -9223372036854775808L;;
val it : int64 = 0L
> -3L * -9223372036854775808L;;
val it : int64 = -9223372036854775808L
> -4L * -9223372036854775808L;;
val it : int64 = 0L

I came to this because it surprised me in F# until I realized that F# by default operates in unchecked contexts. Still, I couldn't readily explain the behavior.

I do understand why 9223372036854775807L + 1L == -9223372036854775808L, I just don't get it for multiplication with a negative number and why it alternates between 0 (binary all zeroes) and -2^63 (binary most significant bit 1, rest zeroes).

Interestingly, this holds with the rule of multiplicative identity, i.e., since -1L * -9223372036854775808L == -9223372036854775808L, it follows that -1L * -1L * -9223372036854775808L == -9223372036854775808L and since -1L * -1L = 1L, it shows that the identity law still holds.

  • 5
    Bound to be a duplicate, but there is one more negative value for signed types - this has the fun property that abs(int)>0 is not always true – John Palmer Dec 17 '16 at 23:56
  • windows calculator gives same results. and not just for QWord but for any size of numbers (i.e Word, Byte...). I think that's something related to 2's complement and the way its calculated. – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 18 '16 at 0:30
  • Isn't the way to multiply by -1 in two's complement to take the complement and add 1? Taking the complement gives 9223372036854775807L and adding 1 gives you the result back what you started with. – Mike Zboray Dec 18 '16 at 0:32
  • 1
    Note (i) that your quantity -9223372036854775808L is in fact -2^63, not -2^64. (ii) that -2^63 is in fact represented as a 1 in the sign bit and the rest of the bits 0; the bit pattern of all 1's represents -1. – Mike Spivey Dec 18 '16 at 0:45
  • @mike, spot on, you're absolutely right, fixed now. – Abel Dec 18 '16 at 0:51
8

The answers you are getting are all correct modulo 2^64: that is, they differ from the mathematically correct answers by a multiple of 2^64, and that's a reasonable definition of a correctly truncated answer.

I'll use ≅ to relate two numbers that are congruent modulo 2^64. Thus

  • -1 * -2^63 = 2^63 ≅ -2^63
  • -2 * -2^63 = 2^64 ≅ 0
  • -3 * -2^63 = 3 * 2^63 = 2^64 + 2^63 ≅ -2^63

and so on. Note that 2^63 and -2^63 are congruent, but it is -2^63 that is representable according to the conventions of twos-complement arithmetic.

5

The behavior is expected due to how negative numbers are represented in 2's complement.

Now assume you have 8 bits.

1000 0000

This is -128(signed). it can be also translated to 128(unsigned)

Multiplying it by -1 will be like this

1000 0000  (*1)=> 1000 0000 (negate)=> 0111 1111 (+1)=> 1000 0000

Which in 8 bits overflows and you get -128 again. (oh and don't forget the maximum value you can get here is 127 not 128. because the MSB is used for sign)

Multiplying it by -2 will be like this

1000 0000  (*2)=> 1 0000 0000 (negate)=> 1111 1111 (+1)=> 1 0000 0000 

And since this value in 8 bits overflows you get 0

  • Did you mean the multiply by two negate step to be 1110 1111 1111? It seems to make sense, but is this also the reason it behaves this way? – Abel Dec 18 '16 at 0:57
  • in mathematics you can have 9 bits. and MSB will be the 9th bit. getting 1110 1111 1111 would not make much sense because those bits does not exist. fixed the answer. and for processors I think OF and CF flags will be set to 1. 9th bit just doesn't fit. @Abel – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 18 '16 at 1:02
  • 1
    I understand, just asking because in an earlier edit you had 3 nibbles. But yeah, makes sense. The carrier bit is probably set in these overflow cases. – Abel Dec 18 '16 at 1:21
  • 1
    1000 0000 "can be also translated to 255" -- as an unsigned number, it would be 128. Is that what you had in mind? – Mike Spivey Dec 18 '16 at 1:25
  • oh, yes thanks for the correction. missed that @MikeSpivey – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 18 '16 at 1:28

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