10

Hey all, for a few of my college assignments I've found the need to check neighbouring cells in 2-dimensional arrays (grids). The solution I've used is a bit of a hack using exceptions, and I'm looking for a way to clean it up without having loads of if statements like some of my classmates. My current solution is

for ( int row = 0; row < grid.length; row++ ) {
    for ( int col = 0; col < grid.length; col++ ) {
        // this section will usually be in a function
        // checks neighbours of the current "cell"
        try {
            for ( int rowMod = -1; rowMod <= 1; rowMod++ ) {
                for ( int colMod = -1; colMod <= 1; colMod++ ) {
                    if ( someVar == grid[row+rowMod][col+colMod] ) {
                        // do something
                    }
                }
            }
        } catch ( ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e ) {
            // do nothing, continue
        }
        // end checking neighbours
    }
}

I shudder to think of the inefficiency using exceptions to get my code to work causes, so I'm looking for suggestions as to how I could remove the reliance on exceptions from my code without sacrificing readability if it's possible, and just how I could make this code segment generally more efficient. Thanks in advance.

  • 1
    Not to chide too much, but exceptions should be for some exceptional. It's almost always better to validate input beforehand, especially in trivial cases. Otherwise, you may cover up important exceptions and otherwise hide flaws with the algorithm. – user166390 Nov 8 '10 at 1:23
  • 3
    All the more reason why I want to get rid of the exceptions. Again it was just a quick hack to finish the assignment, but I'm not satisfied just leaving it like that. – Sean Kelleher Nov 8 '10 at 8:48
23

You can try this. First decide the size of the grid Lets say its 8 X 8 & assign MIN_X = 0, MIN_Y = 0, MAX_X =7, MAX_Y =7

Your curren position is represented by thisPosX , thisPosY, then try this:

int startPosX = (thisPosX - 1 < MIN_X) ? thisPosX : thisPosX-1;
int startPosY = (thisPosY - 1 < MIN_Y) ? thisPosY : thisPosY-1;
int endPosX =   (thisPosX + 1 > MAX_X) ? thisPosX : thisPosX+1;
int endPosY =   (thisPosY + 1 > MAX_Y) ? thisPosY : thisPosY+1;


// See how many are alive
for (int rowNum=startPosX; rowNum<=endPosX; rowNum++) {
    for (int colNum=startPosY; colNum<=endPosY; colNum++) {
        // All the neighbors will be grid[rowNum][colNum]
    }
}

you can finish it in 2 loops.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Yes, I've been thinking about this problem for a while and the best solution I think I've come up with is very like this, except instead of making explicit comparison/assignments I use Math.max and Math.min. – Sean Kelleher Apr 28 '11 at 10:39
7

So row and col currently contain the coordinate of the cell that I want to check the neighbours of. So if I have a class variable called START_OF_GRID which contains 0, my solution would be as follows:

int rowStart  = Math.max( row - 1, START_OF_GRID   );
int rowFinish = Math.min( row + 1, grid.length - 1 );
int colStart  = Math.max( col - 1, START_OF_GRID   );
int colFinish = Math.min( col + 1, grid.length - 1 );

for ( int curRow = rowStart; curRow <= rowFinish; curRow++ ) {
    for ( int curCol = colStart; curCol <= colFinish; curCol++ ) {
        // do something
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    For some reason (may be I'm doing it wrong), Vivek's solution does not work for me (it checks only 4 cells instead of 8). Your's works fine! Thanks. – Vignesh Oct 6 '17 at 6:45
3

why can't you check row+rowMod and col+colMod for validity before array access?

something like:

 r=row+rowMod;
 c=col+colMod;
 if (r < 0 || c < 0 || r >= grid.length || c >= grid.length) continue;

alternatively (no continue):

 if (r >= 0 && c >= 0 && r < grid.length && c < grid.length && 
     someVar == grid[r][c]) { /* do something */ }
| improve this answer | |
  • A good solution, much more efficient than mine, but I'd still consider it a bit hacky since I've learned to avoid break and continue. Thanks very much for the answer. – Sean Kelleher Nov 8 '10 at 8:52
  • if you are afraid of continue just invert the condition and add it to your if – DennyRolling Nov 8 '10 at 16:08
  • I really like this; it's small and doesn't go out of bounds. – Nathan Goings Apr 29 '17 at 21:48
2

The basic principle is not to access things that are out of bounds -- so either protect the bounds or don't go out of bounds in the first place. That is, start at a place where you won't immediately go out of bounds and stop before you get out of bounds.

for ( int row = 1; row < grid.length - 1; row++ ) {
    for ( int col = 1; col < grid.length - 1; col++ ) {
        // this section will usually be in a function
        // checks neighbours of the current "cell"
        for ( int rowMod = -1; rowMod <= 1; rowMod++ ) {
            for ( int colMod = -1; colMod <= 1; colMod++ ) {
                if ( someVar == grid[row+rowMod][col+colMod] ) {
                    // do something
                }
            }
        }
        // end checking neighbours
    }
}

Like your current code, this doesn't necessarily deal appropriately with edge conditions -- that is, it applies a 3x3 grid everywhere that the 3x3 grid fits within the matrix, but does not shrink the grid to a 2x2, 2x3 or 3x2 grid when on the edge of the matrix. It will, however, allow a method in the main body checking a 3x3 grid to observe every cell in the matrix.

| improve this answer | |
  • Also known as a "guard". Usually the "guard" cells (the cells in column 0, for instance) will contain some special value which will either result in a no-operation or be easy to deal with. – user166390 Nov 8 '10 at 1:25
  • Yeah, this would be a solution for, say, my ConnectFour program, where I'm just checking for connected neighbours, but it wouldn't calculate the neighbours properly in a GameOfLife program. I don't need to check each cell necessarily, but find the number of neighbours of each cell (specifying a condition). Thanks for the answer though. – Sean Kelleher Nov 8 '10 at 8:42
1

If I understand your code correctly, and am correctly guessing your concerns, you're trying to avoid checking a non-existent neighbour when the cell of interest is on one edge of the grid. One approach, which may or may not suit your application, is to put a 1-cell wide border all the way round your grid. You then run your loops across the interior of this expanded grid, and all the cells you check have 4 neighbours (or 8 if you count the diagonally neighbouring cells).

| improve this answer | |
  • This, in combination with Mark E's solution, would make a perfect solution, thank you. – Sean Kelleher Nov 8 '10 at 8:50
1

How about this:

private static void printNeighbours(int row, int col, int[][] Data, int rowLen, int colLen)
{
    for(int nextR=row-1; nextR<=row+1; nextR++)
    {
        if(nextR<0 || nextR>=rowLen)
            continue;  //row out of bound
        for(int nextC=col-1; nextC<=col+1; nextC++)
        {
            if(nextC<0 || nextC>=colLen)
                continue;  //col out of bound
            if(nextR==row && nextC==col)
                continue;    //current cell
            System.out.println(Data[nextR][nextC]);
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0
private void fun(char[][] mat, int i, int j){
    int[] ith = { 0, 1, 1, -1, 0, -1 ,-1, 1};
    int[] jth = { 1, 0, 1, 0, -1, -1 ,1,-1};
     // All neighbours of cell
     for (int k = 0; k < 8; k++) {
            if (isValid(i + ith[k], j + jth[k], mat.length)) {
                //do something here 
            }
        }
}

private boolean isValid(int i, int j, int l) {
        if (i < 0 || j < 0 || i >= l || j >= l)
            return false;
        return true;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Please add some description to answer.@Vikas Tiwari – Rohit Poudel Aug 1 '17 at 11:11
  • Updated code. You can access all neighbours in commented area by using mat[i + ith[k]][j + jth[k]]. – Vikas Tiwari Aug 1 '17 at 16:41

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