9

I have a numpy array [0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 0, 1, ...] which only contains the numbers 0-k. I would like to create a new array that contains the n possible arrays of permutations of 0-k. A small example with k=2 and n=6:

a = [0, 1, 0, 2]
permute(a)
result = [[0, 1, 0, 2]
          [0, 2, 0, 1]
          [1, 0, 1, 2]
          [2, 1, 2, 0]
          [1, 2, 1, 0]
          [2, 0, 2, 1]]

Does anyone have any ideas/solutions as to how one could achieve this?

  • 2
    This is a duplicate plus a google away. – kabanus Dec 18 '16 at 15:58
  • 6
    @kabanus OP seems to want distinguishable permutations -- which that link doesn't give. – John Coleman Dec 18 '16 at 16:02
18

Your a is what combinatorists call a multiset. The sympy library has various routines for working with them.

>>> from sympy.utilities.iterables import multiset_permutations
>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.array([0, 1, 0, 2])
>>> for p in multiset_permutations(a):
...     p
...     
[0, 0, 1, 2]
[0, 0, 2, 1]
[0, 1, 0, 2]
[0, 1, 2, 0]
[0, 2, 0, 1]
[0, 2, 1, 0]
[1, 0, 0, 2]
[1, 0, 2, 0]
[1, 2, 0, 0]
[2, 0, 0, 1]
[2, 0, 1, 0]
[2, 1, 0, 0]
  • did not know about this one. learned something new! thanks! +1 – hiro protagonist Dec 18 '16 at 16:32
  • Which is a big reason for my presence here too! – Bill Bell Dec 18 '16 at 16:34
13

if your permutations fit in the memory, you could store them in a set and thus only get the distinguishable permutations.

from itertools import permutations

a = [0, 1, 0, 2]

perms = set()
for perm in permutations(a):
    perms.add(perm)

print(perms)

or - as poined out by John Coleman - in one line:

perms = set(permutations(a))
  • 1
    This is probably okay for small examples, but this involves generating n! permutations when the number of distinguishable permutations might be much smaller – John Coleman Dec 18 '16 at 16:29
  • @JohnColeman: i agree. but as i have no idea how big the sample is... it might just work. – hiro protagonist Dec 18 '16 at 16:31
  • As is often the case in Python, it is a question of scale. This is a perfectly good approach for smaller examples (which is why I upvoted it). For larger examples you would want to use a library with multiset support (as the other answer has). – John Coleman Dec 18 '16 at 16:33
  • 6
    By the way -- set(permutations(a)) is a 1-line implementation of your idea. – John Coleman Dec 18 '16 at 16:39

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