5

There's quite a few threads on this however Using Grand Central Dispatch in Swift to parallelize and speed up “for" loops? uses Swift <3.0 code and I can't get the equivalent to work in 3 (see code). Process Array in parallel using GCD uses pointers and it gets a bit ugly so I'm going to assert right here that I'm looking for the nice Swift 3 way to do it (as efficiently as possible of course). I also heard groups are slow (?) maybe someone can confirm that. I couldn't get groups to work either.

Here is my implementation of a striding parallel map function (in an extension of Array). It want's to execute on the global queue so as to not block the UI. It may be that the concurrent bit doesn't need to be in the scope, only the remainder loop.

extension Array {

    func parallelMap<R>(striding n: Int, f: @escaping (Element) -> R, completion: @escaping ([R]) -> ()) {
        let N = self.count
        var res = [R?](repeating: nil, count: self.count)
        DispatchQueue.global(qos: .userInitiated).async {
            DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform(iterations: N/n) {k in
                for i in (k * n)..<((k + 1) * n) {
                    res[i] = f(self[i]) //Error 1 here
                }
            }
            //remainder loop
            for i in (N - (N % n))..<N {
                res[i] = f(self[i])
            }
            DispatchQueue.main.sync { //But it will pause on this line.
                print("\nPlease work!\n") //This doesn't execute either.
                completion(unwrap(res)!) //Error 2 here, or rather "not here"
            }
        }
    }

}   

public func unwrap<T>(_ arr: Array<T?>) -> Array<T>? {
    if (arr.contains{$0 == nil}) {
        return nil
    } else {
        return arr.map{(x: T?) -> T in x!}
    }
}

Error 1: our old friend EXC_BAD_ACCESS on the inner array assignment line about half the times I test it. I'm guessing this suggests a simultaneous access issue.

Error 2: completion never executes!

Error 3: errors go on forever, I'm sure this will happen once the above are fixed.

Finally: code for the fastest parallel (making sure it's as parallel as possible, I don't like the 'concurrent' in my code) map/for function possible. This is in addition to fixing my code.

7
  • 1
    btw, checkout flatMap. It unwraps optionals similar to your unwrap function
    – Alexander
    Dec 19, 2016 at 2:36
  • 1
    This whole approach can't work. Array is a value type. When you assign to res[i], you're creating a completely different array, unrelated to the original res. If you look at MartinR's solution, he built it with withUnsafeMutableBufferPointer so that he could work directly on the Array's memory, and that is still a reasonable approach in Swift3.
    – Rob Napier
    Dec 19, 2016 at 3:01
  • @RobNapier I thought that when you change the elements of an array it's like a mutating function? Dec 19, 2016 at 3:46
  • @RichardBirkett it is like a mutating function. Those behave the same way. If there are two observers (and there are here), then modifying the array includes copying it.
    – Rob Napier
    Dec 19, 2016 at 3:55
  • 1
    Remember: concurrentPerform is just a function. You're passing a closure to it. That closure captures the value of the array (not a reference to it).
    – Rob Napier
    Dec 19, 2016 at 3:57

1 Answer 1

9

Martin's original approach is still the right way to do this. Merging your approach with his and converting to Swift 3 is fairly straightforward (though I got rid of your optionals and just handled the memory by hand).

extension Array {
    func parallelMap<R>(striding n: Int, f: @escaping (Element) -> R, completion: @escaping ([R]) -> ()) {
        let N = self.count

        let res = UnsafeMutablePointer<R>.allocate(capacity: N)

        DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform(iterations: N/n) { k in
            for i in (k * n)..<((k + 1) * n) {
                res[i] = f(self[i])
            }
        }

        for i in (N - (N % n))..<N {
            res[i] = f(self[i])
        }

        let finalResult = Array<R>(UnsafeBufferPointer(start: res, count: N))
        res.deallocate(capacity: N)

        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            completion(finalResult)
        }
    }
}

Martin's version avoids the extra copy because he has a "zero" value to initialize the array to. If you know your type has a trivial init(), you can avoid the extra copy:

protocol TriviallyInitializable {
    init()
}

extension Array {
    func parallelMap<R>(striding n: Int, f: @escaping (Element) -> R, completion: @escaping ([R]) -> ()) where R: TriviallyInitializable {
        let N = self.count

        var finalResult = Array<R>(repeating: R(), count: N)

        finalResult.withUnsafeMutableBufferPointer { res in
            DispatchQueue.concurrentPerform(iterations: N/n) { k in
                for i in (k * n)..<((k + 1) * n) {
                    res[i] = f(self[i])
                }
            }
        }

        for i in (N - (N % n))..<N {
            finalResult[i] = f(self[i])
        }

        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            completion(finalResult)
        }
    }
}
14
  • I'm still not getting anything logged (Array(0..<10), using trivial f, completion prints whatever). Dec 19, 2016 at 4:48
  • How are you testing it? Remember that you'll need a "requiresInfiniteExecution" (or whatever it's called) in a playground or the playground will stop executing before it's done running.
    – Rob Napier
    Dec 19, 2016 at 12:51
  • 1
    I think it would be better for the parallelMap to be synchronous (use a dispatch group within). If somebody wants to make it async, that can do that on their end. Seems like a synchronous call would be the more likely usecase
    – Alexander
    Apr 22, 2017 at 4:58
  • 1
    To be synchronous, just return finalResult. concurrentPerform is synchronous. striding is the size of the block to operate on (so an array of 20 with a stride of 4 would dispatch 5 blocks.
    – Rob Napier
    Oct 16, 2017 at 12:45
  • 1
    I am slightly concerned about res[i] = f(self[i]). Would it be the case that Swift tries to release res[i] before doing the assignment? It feels better to get the pointer through res.baseAddress!.advanced(by: i) and then using initialize(to:) to do the assignment. Maybe my concern is unnecessary, but I just want to be careful. Oct 22, 2018 at 23:04

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