41

I have a bunch of classes which all inherit the same attributes from a common base class. The base class implements some virtual functions that work in general cases, whilst each subclass re-implements those virtual functions for a variety of special cases.

Here's the situation: I want the special-ness of these sub-classed objects to be expendable. Essentially, I would like to implement an expend() function which causes an object to lose its sub-class identity and revert to being a base-class instance with the general-case behaviours implemented in the base class.

I should note that the derived classes don't introduce any additional variables, so both the base and derived classes should be the same size in memory.

I'm open to destroying the old object and creating a new one, as long as I can create the new object at the same memory address, so existing pointers aren't broken.

The following attempt doesn't work, and produces some seemingly unexpected behaviour. What am I missing here?

#include <iostream>

class Base {
public:
    virtual void whoami() { 
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void whoami() {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";
    }
};

Base* object;

int main() {
    object = new Derived; //assign a new Derived class instance
    object->whoami(); //this prints "I am Derived"

    Base baseObject;
    *object = baseObject; //reassign existing object to a different type
    object->whoami(); //but it *STILL* prints "I am Derived" (!)

    return 0;
}
  • 3
    Remember that C++ is not a dynamic language, once it's compiled it's all fixed. – Some programmer dude Dec 19 '16 at 10:06
  • 10
    What you seem to be asking for is an application of placement new but I won't provide an answer -- it's bad design IMO. – matb Dec 19 '16 at 10:15
  • 7
    Maybe you can use the strategy design pantern instead of a class hierachy – user2672107 Dec 19 '16 at 11:10
  • 5
    @Someprogrammerdude: That is too strong. There's a reason we have something called dynamic_cast. While it's true that an object never changes its type, we may be using expressions of various compatible types to refer to that object. In particular, we may use base classes. Ex. Base* p = rand() ? new Derived1 : new Derived2;. While the static type of p is fixed, the dynamic type of *p isn't. – MSalters Dec 19 '16 at 14:59
  • 3
    The error in *object = baseObject strongly hints that you lack understanding of the very foundations of inheritance and polymorphism. Once you get over that, you'll probably discover some obvious answer, eg that what you wanted was composition instead of inheritance or something just as trivial. – Agent_L Dec 19 '16 at 15:53

16 Answers 16

35

You can at the cost of breaking good practices and maintaining unsafe code. Other answers will provide you with nasty tricks to achieve this.

I dont like answers that just says "you should not do that", but I would like to suggest there probably is a better way to achieve the result you seek for.

The strategy pattern as suggested in a comment by @manni66 is a good one.

You should also think about data oriented design, since a class hierarchy does not look like a wise choice in your case.

  • When he does *object = baseObject, does anyone know whether the vtable in baseObject gets copied over to the derived object? If so, then when he calls object->whoamI() won't that call the base version of the function? – Zebrafish Dec 19 '16 at 17:45
  • Never mind, it obviously doesn't. In my Implementation the vtable seems to be 8 bytes and it's not copied over. Interestingly though, if I memcpy sizeof(Base) instead of assigning it, it calls the Base version. This seems like a cool feature to have. – Zebrafish Dec 19 '16 at 18:14
  • 7
    @TitoneMaurice: I've heard Undefined Behavior described using many invectives, but this is the first time I've heard it called "cool". – Ben Voigt Dec 19 '16 at 22:02
  • 1
    @TitoneMaurice Object slicing (at least, AFAICT) – Nic Hartley Dec 19 '16 at 22:20
  • 3
    @Titone Any program that would profit from such a trick, is a c++ program with some very, very serious design problems. There's no reason for the standard to cater to badly designed programs. – Voo Dec 20 '16 at 8:08
16

Yes and no. A C++ class defines the type of a memory region that is an object. Once the memory region has been instantiated, its type is set. You can try to work around the type system sure, but the compiler won't let you get away with it. Sooner or later it will shoot you in the foot, because the compiler made an assumption about types that you violated, and there is no way to stop the compiler from making such assumption in a portable fashion.

However there is a design pattern for this: It's "State". You extract what changes into it's own class hierarchy, with its own base class, and you have your objects store a pointer to the abstract state base of this new hierarchy. You can then swap those to your hearts content.

  • 1
    I think the pattern you're describing is more commonly referred to as the strategy pattern – Nic Hartley Dec 19 '16 at 22:21
  • @QPaysTaxes - That's what the GoF called it. But they are closely related. Anyway, I believed the OP wanted to change the objects layout, so that's why I named that pattern. I'll leave is as it is for variety. – StoryTeller Dec 20 '16 at 6:09
  • Fair enough. I just wanted people to have a much longer, more in-depth explanation available :) – Nic Hartley Dec 20 '16 at 23:07
14

No it's not possible to change the type of an object once instantiated.

*object = baseObject; doesn't change the type of object, it merely calls a compiler-generated assignment operator.

It would have been a different matter if you had written

object = new Base;

(remembering to call delete naturally; currently your code leaks an object).

C++11 onwards gives you the ability to move the resources from one object to another; see

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/move

  • But this would change the address of the object. Existing pointers to the former object would then point to undefined memory. – dwk Dec 19 '16 at 10:17
  • 2
    Absolutely. But there would be nothing stopping you from building a class that manages this behaviour. You could even overload the address-of operator. – Bathsheba Dec 19 '16 at 10:21
  • Actually, in most compilers you CAN overwrite vtable pointer which will yield exactly what OP wants. Nice trick to impress your friends, a horrible hack in actual code. – Agent_L Dec 19 '16 at 16:02
  • 1
    @Agent Which just goes to show that you're not imaginative enough. Just the most obvious optimisation: compilers can cache the vtable entry for unchanged pointers (since the identity of an existing object cannot change this is valid). – Voo Dec 22 '16 at 11:33
  • 1
    @Voo Well, you should have been more clear then. I would explain then that it's exactly what I've meant by calling it a horrible hack. – Agent_L Dec 22 '16 at 15:25
13

I'm open to destroying the old object and creating a new one, as long as I can create the new object at the same memory address, so existing pointers aren't broken.

The C++ Standard explicitly addresses this idea in section 3.8 (Object Lifetime):

If, after the lifetime of an object has ended and before the storage which the object occupied is reused or released, a new object is created at the storage location which the original object occupied, a pointer that pointed to the original object, a reference that referred to the original object, or the name of the original object will automatically refer to the new object and, once the lifetime of the new object has started, can be used to manipulate the new object <snip>

Oh wow, this is exactly what you wanted. But I didn't show the whole rule. Here's the rest:

if:

  • the storage for the new object exactly overlays the storage location which the original object occupied, and
  • the new object is of the same type as the original object (ignoring the top-level cv-qualifiers), and
  • the type of the original object is not const-qualified, and, if a class type, does not contain any non-static data member whose type is const-qualified or a reference type, and
  • the original object was a most derived object (1.8) of type T and the new object is a most derived object of type T (that is, they are not base class subobjects).

So your idea has been thought of by the language committee and specifically made illegal, including the sneaky workaround that "I have a base class subobject of the right type, I'll just make a new object in its place" which the last bullet point stops in its tracks.

You can replace an object with an object of a different type as @RossRidge's answer shows. Or you can replace an object and keep using pointers that existed before the replacement. But you cannot do both together.

However, like the famous quote: "Any problem in computer science can be solved by adding a layer of indirection" and that is true here too.

Instead of your suggested method

Derived d;
Base* p = &d;
new (p) Base();  // makes p invalid!  Plus problems when d's destructor is automatically called

You can do:

unique_ptr<Base> p = make_unique<Derived>();
p.reset(make_unique<Base>());

If you hide this pointer and slight-of-hand inside another class, you'll have the "design pattern" such as State or Strategy mentioned in other answers. But they all rely on one extra level of indirection.

9

You can do what you're literally asking for with placement new and an explicit destructor call. Something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdlib.h>

class Base {
public:
    virtual void whoami() { 
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void whoami() {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";
    }
};

union Both {
    Base base;
    Derived derived;
};

Base *object;

int
main() {
    Both *tmp = (Both *) malloc(sizeof(Both));
    object = new(&tmp->base) Base;

    object->whoami(); 

    Base baseObject;
    tmp = (Both *) object;
    tmp->base.Base::~Base();
    new(&tmp->derived) Derived; 

    object->whoami(); 

    return 0;
}

However as matb said, this really isn't a good design. I would recommend reconsidering what you're trying to do. Some of other answers here might also solve your problem, but I think anything along the idea of what you're asking for is going to be kludge. You should seriously consider designing your application so you can change the pointer when the type of the object changes.

  • 4
    I considered (but didn't) voting down because the first sentence is wrong. You can not change the class of an object. One can replace an object with another one of a different class, as you do in your code. – Daniel Jour Dec 19 '16 at 13:20
  • 3
    I'm downvoting for precisely that reason. Let me know when it's fixed. – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 19 '16 at 13:58
  • 1
    Does this trigger undefined behaviour? – Kos Dec 19 '16 at 17:49
  • 4
    The second ` object->whoami` is undefined behavior. The pointer to base is pointing to a destroyed object; no aliasing is permitted without going back through a pointer-to-derived here as far as I know. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Dec 19 '16 at 18:33
  • 1
    @mark UB that works in practice is acceptable to exploit when there is a huge ROI to offset the infinite future maintenance pain. I do not see the huge ROI here. If anything we have insane non-locality of side effects; even if defined it may be crazy. As a practical way this can fail, compilers can cache the vtable entry on unchanged pointers with perfect validity, as this change in vtable cannot be done without mutating the pointer without UB. Valid, simple optimization that breaks this trick. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Dec 20 '16 at 23:40
9

I suggest you use the Strategy Pattern, e.g.

#include <iostream>

class IAnnouncer {
public:
    virtual ~IAnnouncer() { }
    virtual void whoami() = 0;
};

class AnnouncerA : public IAnnouncer {
public:
    void whoami() override {
        std::cout << "I am A\n";
    }
};

class AnnouncerB : public IAnnouncer {
public:
    void whoami() override {
        std::cout << "I am B\n";
    }
};

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(IAnnouncer *announcer) : announcer(announcer)
    {
    }
    void run()
    {
        // Do stuff
        if(nullptr != announcer)
        {
            announcer->whoami();
        }
        // Do other stuff
    }
    void expend(IAnnouncer* announcer)
    {
        this->announcer = announcer;
    }
private:
    IAnnouncer *announcer;
};


int main() {
    AnnouncerA a;
    Foo foo(&a);

    foo.run();

    // Ready to "expend"
    AnnouncerB b;
    foo.expend(&b);

    foo.run();

    return 0;
}

This is a very flexible pattern that has at least a few benefits over trying to deal with the issue through inheritance:

  • You can easily change the behavior of Foo later on by implementing a new Announcer
  • Your Announcers (and your Foos) are easily unit tested
  • You can reuse your Announcers elsewhere int he code

I suggest you have a look at the age-old "Composition vs. Inheritance" debate (cf. https://www.thoughtworks.com/insights/blog/composition-vs-inheritance-how-choose)

ps. You've leaked a Derived in your original post! Have a look at std::unique_ptr if it is available.

8

You can by introducing a variable to the base class, so the memory footprint stays the same. By setting the flag you force calling the derived or the base class implementation.

#include <iostream>

class Base {
public:
    Base() : m_useDerived(true)
    {
    }

    void setUseDerived(bool value)
    {
        m_useDerived = value;
    }

    void whoami() {
        m_useDerived ? whoamiImpl() : Base::whoamiImpl();
    }

protected:
    virtual void whoamiImpl() { std::cout << "I am Base\n"; }

private:
    bool m_useDerived;
};

class Derived : public Base {
protected:
    void whoamiImpl() {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";
    }
};

Base* object;

int main() {
    object = new Derived; //assign a new Derived class instance
    object->whoami(); //this prints "I am Derived"

    object->setUseDerived(false);
    object->whoami(); //should print "I am Base"

    return 0;
}
7

In addition to other answers, you could use function pointers (or any wrapper on them, like std::function) to achieve the necessary bevahior:

void print_base(void) {
    cout << "This is base" << endl;
}

void print_derived(void) {
    cout << "This is derived" << endl;
}

class Base {
public:
    void (*print)(void);

    Base() {
        print = print_base;
    }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    Derived() {
        print = print_derived;
    }
};

int main() {
    Base* b = new Derived();
    b->print(); // prints "This is derived"
    *b = Base();
    b->print(); // prints "This is base"
    return 0;
}

Also, such function pointers approach would allow you to change any of the functions of the objects in run-time, not limiting you to some already defined sets of members implemented in derived classes.

  • Also called strategy pattern – WorldSEnder Dec 19 '16 at 13:31
  • 1
    I'd call it "reimplementing vtables in code" - just add a struct/class to hold several function pointers, and you have precisely what C++ does under the hood (with the only difference that you are now free to manipulate the vtable(-pointer) at will). – cmaster Dec 20 '16 at 12:25
3

There is a simple error in your program. You assign the objects, but not the pointers:

int main() {
    Base* object = new Derived; //assign a new Derived class instance
    object->whoami(); //this prints "I am Derived"

    Base baseObject;

Now you assign baseObject to *object which overwrites the Derived object with a Base object. However, this does work well because you are overwriting an object of type Derived with an object of type Base. The default assignment operator just assigns all members, which in this case does nothing. The object cannot change its type and still is a Derived objects afterwards. In general, this can leads to serious problems e.g. object slicing.

    *object = baseObject; //reassign existing object to a different type
    object->whoami(); //but it *STILL* prints "I am Derived" (!)

    return 0;
}

If you instead just assign the pointer it will work as expected, but you just have two objects, one of type Derived and one Base, but I think you want some more dynamic behavior. It sounds like you could implement the specialness as a Decorator.

You have a base-class with some operation, and several derived classes that change/modify/extend the base-class behavior of that operation. Since it is based on composition it can be changed dynamically. The trick is to store a base-class reference in the Decorator instances and use that for all other functionality.

class Base {
public:
    virtual void whoami() { 
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }

    virtual void otherFunctionality() {}
};

class Derived1 : public Base {
public:
    Derived1(Base* base): m_base(base) {}

    virtual void whoami() override {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";

        // maybe even call the base-class implementation
        // if you just want to add something
    }

    virtual void otherFunctionality() {
        base->otherFunctionality();
    }
private:
    Base* m_base;
};

Base* object;

int main() {
    Base baseObject;
    object = new Derived(&baseObject); //assign a new Derived class instance
    object->whoami(); //this prints "I am Derived"

    // undecorate
    delete object;
    object = &baseObject; 

    object->whoami(); 

    return 0;
}

There are alternative patterns like Strategy which implement different use cases resp. solve different problems. It would probably good to read the pattern documentation with special focus to the Intent and Motivation sections.

  • Decorator won't work. When you undecorate you break other pointers. That's not what the OP wants. – atoMerz Dec 21 '16 at 4:48
  • @atoMerz It would be good if the OP posts some more context what he is trying to achieve. Right now it is more a solution to an unknown problem which doesn't work. Decorators work very well if you want to dynamically change the behavior of an object, so I presented that option since others presented the strategy. – Jens Dec 21 '16 at 10:42
  • IMO the question has enough details, that is irrelevant however. Because even given the current information about the problem, the strategy pattern works, whereas the decorator fails. In particular your solution invalidates other pointers and or does not change their behavior at all. This is what the OP asked for. The change should affect all pointers and not break any of them. – atoMerz Dec 21 '16 at 15:20
  • @atoMerz It's good that we read the question differently :-) – Jens Dec 21 '16 at 15:51
3

I would consider regularizing your type.

class Base {
public:
  virtual void whoami() { std::cout << "Base\n"; }
  std::unique_ptr<Base> clone() const {
    return std::make_unique<Base>(*this);
  }
  virtual ~Base() {}
};
class Derived: public Base {
  virtual void whoami() overload {
    std::cout << "Derived\n";
  };
  std::unique_ptr<Base> clone() const override {
    return std::make_unique<Derived>(*this);
  }
public:
  ~Derived() {}
};
struct Base_Value {
private:
  std::unique_ptr<Base> pImpl;
public:
  void whoami () {
    pImpl->whoami();
  }
  template<class T, class...Args>
  void emplace( Args&&...args ) {
    pImpl = std::make_unique<T>(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
  }
  Base_Value()=default;
  Base_Value(Base_Value&&)=default;
  Base_Value& operator=(Base_Value&&)=default;
  Base_Value(Base_Value const&o) {
    if (o.pImpl) pImpl = o.pImpl->clone();
  }
  Base_Value& operator=(Base_Value&& o) {
    auto tmp = std::move(o);
    swap( pImpl, tmp.pImpl );
    return *this;
  }
};

Now a Base_Value is semantically a value-type that behaves polymorphically.

Base_Value object;
object.emplace<Derived>();
object.whoami();

object.emplace<Base>();
object.whoami();

You could wrap a Base_Value instance in a smart pointer, but I wouldn't bother.

1

I don’t disagree with the advice that this isn’t a great design, but another safe way to do it is with a union that can hold any of the classes you want to switch between, since the standard guarantees it can safely hold any of them. Here’s a version that encapsulates all the details inside the union itself:

#include <cassert>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <new>
#include <typeinfo>

class Base {
public:
    virtual void whoami() { 
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }

   virtual ~Base() {}  // Every base class with child classes that might be deleted through a pointer to the
                       // base must have a virtual destructor!
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void whoami() {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";
    }
    // At most one member of any union may have a default member initializer in C++11, so:
    Derived(bool) : Base() {}
};

union BorD {
    Base b;
    Derived d; // Initialize one member.

    BorD(void) : b() {} // These defaults are not used here.
    BorD( const BorD& ) : b() {} // No per-instance data to worry about!
                                 // Otherwise, this could get complicated.
    BorD& operator= (const BorD& x) // Boilerplate:
    {
         if ( this != &x ) {
             this->~BorD();
             new(this) BorD(x);
         }
         return *this;
    }

    BorD( const Derived& x ) : d(x) {} // The constructor we use.
    // To destroy, be sure to call the base class’ virtual destructor,
    // which works so long as every member derives from Base.
    ~BorD(void) { dynamic_cast<Base*>(&this->b)->~Base(); }

    Base& toBase(void)
    {  // Sets the active member to b.
       Base* const p = dynamic_cast<Base*>(&b);

       assert(p); // The dynamic_cast cannot currently fail, but check anyway.
       if ( typeid(*p) != typeid(Base) ) {
           p->~Base();      // Call the virtual destructor.
           new(&b) Base;    // Call the constructor.
       }
       return b;
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    BorD u(Derived{false});

    Base& reference = u.d; // By the standard, u, u.b and u.d have the same address.

    reference.whoami(); // Should say derived.
    u.toBase();
    reference.whoami(); // Should say base.

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

A simpler way to get what you want is probably to keep a container of Base * and replace the items individually as needed with new and delete. (Still remember to declare your destructor virtual! That’s important with polymorphic classes, so you call the right destructor for that instance, not the base class’ destructor.) This might save you some extra bytes on instances of the smaller classes. You would need to play around with smart pointers to get safe automatic deletion, though. One advantage of unions over smart pointers to dynamic memory is that you don’t have to allocate or free any more objects on the heap, but can just re-use the memory you have.

0

DISCLAIMER: The code here is provided as means to understand an idea, not to be implemented in production.

You're using inheritance. It can achieve 3 things:

  • Add fields
  • Add methods
  • replace virtual methods

Out of all those features, you're using only the last one. This means that you're not actually forced to rely on inheritance. You can get the same results by many other means. The simplest is to keep tabs on the "type" by yourself - this will allow you to change it on the fly:

#include <stdexcept>

enum MyType { BASE, DERIVED };

class Any {
private:
    enum MyType type;
public:
    void whoami() { 
        switch(type){
            case BASE:
                std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
                return;
            case DERIVED:
                std::cout << "I am Derived\n"; 
                return;
        }
        throw std::runtime_error( "undefined type" );
    }
    void changeType(MyType newType){
        //insert some checks if that kind of transition is legal
        type = newType;
    }
    Any(MyType initialType){
        type = initialType;
    }

};

Without inheritance the "type" is yours to do whatever you want. You can changeType at any time it suits you. With that power also comes responsibility: the compiler will no longer make sure the type is correct or even set at all. You have to ensure it or you'll get hard to debug runtime errors.

You may wrap it in inheritance just as well, eg. to get a drop-in replacement for existing code:

class Base : Any {
public:
    Base() : Any(BASE) {}
};

class Derived : public Any {
public:
    Derived() : Any(DERIVED) {}
};

OR (slightly uglier):

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    Derived : Base() {
        changeType(DERIVED)
    }
};

This solution is easy to implement and easy to understand. But with more options in the switch and more code in each path it gets very messy. So the very first step is to refactor the actual code out of the switch and into self-contained functions. Where better to keep than other than Derivied class?

class Base  {
public:
    static whoami(Any* This){
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }
};

class Derived  {
public:
    static whoami(Any* This){
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n"; 
    }
};

/*you know where it goes*/
    switch(type){
        case BASE:
            Base:whoami(this);
            return;
        case DERIVED:
            Derived:whoami(this);
            return;
    }

Then you can replace the switch with an external class that implements it via virtual inheritance and TADA! We've reinvented the Strategy Pattern, as others have said in the first place : )

The bottom line is: whatever you do, you're not inheriting the main class.

0

you cannot change to the type of an object after instantiation, as you can see in your example you have a pointer to a Base class (of type base class) so this type is stuck to it until the end.

  • the base pointer can point to upper or down object doesn't mean changed its type:

    Base* ptrBase; // pointer to base class (type)
    ptrBase = new Derived; // pointer of type base class `points to an object of derived class`
    
    Base theBase;
    ptrBase = &theBase; // not *ptrBase = theDerived: Base of type Base class points to base Object.
    
  • pointers are much strong, flexible, powerful as much dangerous so you should handle them cautiously.

in your example I can write:

Base* object; // pointer to base class just declared to point to garbage
Base bObject; // object of class Base
*object = bObject; // as you did in your code

above it's a disaster assigning value to un-allocated pointer. the program will crash.

in your example you escaped the crash through the memory which was allocated at first:

object = new Derived;

it's never good idea to assign a value and not address of a subclass object to base class. however in built-in you can but consider this example:

int* pInt = NULL;

int* ptrC = new int[1];
ptrC[0] = 1;

pInt = ptrC;

for(int i = 0; i < 1; i++)
    cout << pInt[i] << ", ";
cout << endl;

int* ptrD = new int[3];
ptrD[0] = 5;
ptrD[1] = 7;
ptrD[2] = 77;

*pInt = *ptrD; // copying values of ptrD to a pointer which point to an array of only one element!
// the correct way:
// pInt = ptrD;

for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    cout << pInt[i] << ", ";
cout << endl;

so the result as not as you guess.

0

I have 2 solutions. A simpler one that doesn't preserve the memory address, and one that does preserve the memory address.

Both require that you provide provide downcasts from Base to Derived which isn't a problem in your case.

struct Base {
  int a;
  Base(int a) : a{a} {};
  virtual ~Base() = default;
  virtual auto foo() -> void { cout << "Base " << a << endl; }
};
struct D1 : Base {
  using Base::Base;
  D1(Base b) : Base{b.a} {};
  auto foo() -> void override { cout << "D1 " << a << endl; }
};
struct D2 : Base {
  using Base::Base;
  D2(Base b) : Base{b.a} {};
  auto foo() -> void override { cout << "D2 " << a << endl; }
};

For the former one you can create a smart pointer that can seemingly change the held data between Derived (and base) classes:

template <class B> struct Morpher {
  std::unique_ptr<B> obj;

  template <class D> auto morph() {
    obj = std::make_unique<D>(*obj);
  }

  auto operator->() -> B* { return obj.get(); }
};

int main() {
  Morpher<Base> m{std::make_unique<D1>(24)};
  m->foo();        // D1 24

  m.morph<D2>();
  m->foo();        // D2 24
}

The magic is in

m.morph<D2>();

which changes the held object preserving the data members (actually uses the cast ctor).


If you need to preserve the memory location, you can adapt the above to use a buffer and placement new instead of unique_ptr. It is a little more work a whole lot more attention to pay to, but it gives you exactly what you need:

template <class B> struct Morpher {
  std::aligned_storage_t<sizeof(B)> buffer_;
  B *obj_;

  template <class D>
  Morpher(const D &new_obj)
      : obj_{new (&buffer_) D{new_obj}} {
    static_assert(std::is_base_of<B, D>::value && sizeof(D) == sizeof(B) &&
                  alignof(D) == alignof(B));
  }
  Morpher(const Morpher &) = delete;
  auto operator=(const Morpher &) = delete;
  ~Morpher() { obj_->~B(); }

  template <class D> auto morph() {
    static_assert(std::is_base_of<B, D>::value && sizeof(D) == sizeof(B) &&
                  alignof(D) == alignof(B));

    obj_->~B();
    obj_ = new (&buffer_) D{*obj_};
  }

  auto operator-> () -> B * { return obj_; }
};

int main() {
  Morpher<Base> m{D1{24}};
  m->foo(); // D1 24

  m.morph<D2>();
  m->foo(); // D2 24

  m.morph<Base>();
  m->foo(); // Base 24
}

This is of course the absolute bare bone. You can add move ctor, dereference operator etc.

-1
 #include <iostream>
class Base {
public:
    virtual void whoami() { 
        std::cout << "I am Base\n"; 
    }
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void whoami() {
        std::cout << "I am Derived\n";
    }
};
Base* object;

int main() {
    object = new Derived; 
    object->whoami(); 
    Base baseObject;
    object = &baseObject;// this is how you change.
    object->whoami();
    return 0;
}

output:

I am Derived                                                                                                                     
I am Base 
-2

Your assignment only assigns member variables, not the pointer used for virtual member function calls. You can easily replace that with full memory copy:

//*object = baseObject; //this assignment was wrong
memcpy(object, &baseObject, sizeof(baseObject));

Note that much like your attempted assignment, this would replace member variables in *object with those of the newly constructed baseObject - probably not what you actually want, so you'll have to copy the original member variables to the new baseObject first, using either assignment operator or copy constructor before the memcpy, i.e.

Base baseObject = *object;

It is possible to copy just the virtual functions table pointer but that would rely on internal knowledge about how the compiler stores it so is not recommended.

If keeping the object at the same memory address is not crucial, a simpler and so better approach would be the opposite - construct a new base object and copy the original object's member variables over - i.e. use a copy constructor.

object = new Base(*object);

But you'll also have to delete the original object, so the above one-liner won't be enough - you need to remember the original pointer in another variable in order to delete it, etc. If you have multiple references to that original object you'll need to update them all, and sometimes this can be quite complicated. Then the memcpy way is better.

If some of the member variables themselves are pointers to objects that are created/deleted in the main object's constructor/destructor, or if they have a more specialized assignment operator or other custom logic, you'll have some more work on your hands, but for trivial member variables this should be good enough.

  • 1
    That answer is a recipe for disaster. Memcpying an object only works if it is trivially copyable. In the OPs case the class is polymorphic and thus not trivially-copyable. Memcpying the object is UB and thus a severe error in your program. – Jens Dec 21 '16 at 10:53
  • An object with virtual methods is not "trivially copyable" by definition, but if that is the only factor making it such, i.e. all its member variables are trivially copyable, then memcpy is perfect for this specific question. – user7321148 Dec 23 '16 at 10:54
  • Also you can factor in any other problem and work around it, it is not UB you just have to understand what you are doing. – user7321148 Dec 23 '16 at 10:56
  • Memcpy is never suitable for non-trivially copyable classes. This is one of the main points of the definition. It is UB, at least that is what the programming language standard says it is. It may work in practice, but it is not something you should ever rely on. It may break, e.g. when I memcpy an object into a buffer and send it to another program that than wants to use it. The vtable is probably at a different address. – Jens Jan 1 '17 at 18:13
  • The problem is also that you may understand what you are doing, but this may change because it is UB. THe compiler may decide to exploit the UB to do something, and maybe this only happens when you change compiler version, switches or even just the context because some assumption can be propagated. – Jens Jan 1 '17 at 18:14

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