100
df = pd.DataFrame([[1,2,3], [10,20,30], [100,200,300]])
df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples((("a", "b"), ("a", "c"), ("d", "f")))
df

returns

     a         d
     b    c    f
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300

and

df.columns.levels[1]

returns

Index([u'b', u'c', u'f'], dtype='object')

I want to rename "f" to "e". According to pandas.MultiIndex.rename I run:

df.columns.rename(["b1", "c1", "f1"], level=1)

But it raises

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-110-b171a2b5706c> in <module>()
----> 1 df.columns.rename(["b1", "c1", "f1"], level=1)

C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Continuum\Miniconda2\lib\site-packages\pandas\indexes\base.pyc in set_names(self, names, level, inplace)
    994         if level is not None and not is_list_like(level) and is_list_like(
    995                 names):
--> 996             raise TypeError("Names must be a string")
    997 
    998         if not is_list_like(names) and level is None and self.nlevels > 1:

TypeError: Names must be a string

I use Python 2.7.12 |Continuum Analytics, Inc.| (default, Jun 29 2016, 11:07:13) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)]' and pandas 0.19.1

1
  • 9
    Another thing you can't do is df.rename(columns={('d', 'f'): ('e', 'g')}), even though it seems correct. In other words: .rename() does not do what one expects, because even though the key for every column is a tuple, the implementation in pandas is by two lists: df.keys().levels and df.keys().labels. Changing the key for one column may require you to append an element to levels, if you don't want to change all occurrences of that name.
    – Lukas
    Commented Mar 9, 2019 at 19:15

7 Answers 7

89

Use set_levels:

In [22]:
df.columns.set_levels(['b1','c1','f1'],level=1,inplace=True)
df

Out[22]:
     a         d
    b1   c1   f1
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300

rename sets the name for the index, it doesn't rename the column names:

In [26]:
df.columns = df.columns.rename("b1", level=1)
df

Out[26]:
      a         d
b1    b    c    f
0     1    2    3
1    10   20   30
2   100  200  300

This is why you get the error

5
  • 6
    In python3, it is df.index.set_levels(['b1','c1','f1'],level=1,inplace=True)
    – gies0r
    Commented Jun 4, 2020 at 17:21
  • Is it possible to access the column names without printing the dataframe? Commented Feb 19, 2023 at 8:25
  • @AntonioSesto yes. df.columns for the labels, and df.columns.names for the level names Commented May 2, 2023 at 5:06
  • I can't get this to work. I get TypeError: set_levels() got an unexpected keyword argument 'inplace'. The current docs show no inplace argument. Has something changed?
    – Bill
    Commented Aug 16, 2023 at 2:13
  • This works: df.columns = df.columns.set_levels(['b1', 'c1', 'f1'], level=1)
    – Bill
    Commented Aug 16, 2023 at 2:14
67

In pandas 0.21.0+ use parameter level=1:

d = dict(zip(df.columns.levels[1], ["b1", "c1", "f1"]))
print (d)
{'c': 'c1', 'b': 'b1', 'f': 'f1'}

df = df.rename(columns=d, level=1)
print (df)
     a         d
    b1   c1   f1
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300
0
47

You can use pandas.DataFrame.rename() directly

Say you have the following dataframe

print(df)

     a         d
     b    c    f
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300
df = df.rename(columns={'f': 'f1', 'd': 'd1'})
print(df)

     a        d1
     b    c   f1
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300

You see, column name mapper doesn't relate with level.

Say you have the following dataframe

     a         d
     b    f    f
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300

If you want to rename the f under a, you can do

df.columns = df.columns.values
df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(df.rename(columns={('a', 'f'): ('a', 'af')}))
# or in one line
df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(df.set_axis(df.columns.values, axis=1)
                                       .rename(columns={('a', 'f'): ('a', 'af')}))
print(df)

     a         d
     b   af    f
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300
4
  • Would you be so kind to explain why df.columns = df.columns.values is required in the last case? Commented Jun 7, 2022 at 18:50
  • 2
    @ThomasHilger To convert the MultiIndex to a list of tuples as the tuple can be matched in rename. Another option is to use pandas.MultiIndex.to_flat_index.
    – Ynjxsjmh
    Commented Jun 8, 2022 at 1:49
  • I expected this to work for renaming f under a: df.rename(columns={('a', 'f'): ('a', 'af')}); why does it fail? Commented Sep 5, 2022 at 21:05
  • 1
    @AttilatheFun MultiIndex is different from tuple.
    – Ynjxsjmh
    Commented Sep 6, 2022 at 1:39
15

There is also index.set_names (code)

df.index.set_names(["b1", "c1", "f1"], inplace=True)
1
  • I think your answer is missing argument level=1.
    – normanius
    Commented Nov 25, 2020 at 17:32
10

Another thing you can't do is df.rename(columns={('d', 'f'): ('e', 'g')}), even though it seems correct. In other words: .rename() does not do what one expects, <...>

-- Lukas at comment

The "hacky" way is something like this (as far as for pandas 1.0.5)

def rename_columns(df, columns, inplace=False):
    """Rename dataframe columns.

    Parameters
    ----------
    df : pandas.DataFrame
        Dataframe.
    columns : dict-like
        Alternative to specifying axis. If `df.columns` is
        :obj: `pandas.MultiIndex`-object and has a few levels, pass equal-size tuples.

    Returns
    -------
    pandas.DataFrame or None
        Returns dataframe with modifed columns or ``None`` (depends on `inplace` parameter value).
    
    Examples
    --------
    >>> columns = pd.Index([1, 2, 3])
    >>> df = pd.DataFrame([[1, 2, 3], [10, 20, 30]], columns=columns)
    ...     1   2   3
    ... 0   1   2   3
    ... 1  10  20  30
    >>> rename_columns(df, columns={1 : 10})
    ...    10   2   3
    ... 0   1   2   3
    ... 1  10  20  30
    
    MultiIndex
    
    >>> columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples([("A0", "B0", "C0"), ("A1", "B1", "C1"), ("A2", "B2", "")])
    >>> df = pd.DataFrame([[1, 2, 3], [10, 20, 30]], columns=columns)
    >>> df
    ...    A0  A1  A2
    ...    B0  B1  B2
    ...    C0  C1
    ... 0   1   2   3
    ... 1  10  20  30
    >>> rename_columns(df, columns={("A2", "B2", "") : ("A3", "B3", "")})
    ...    A0  A1  A3
    ...    B0  B1  B3
    ...    C0  C1
    ... 0   1   2   3
    ... 1  10  20  30
    """
    columns_new = []
    for col in df.columns.values:
        if col in columns:
            columns_new.append(columns[col])
        else:
            columns_new.append(col)
    columns_new = pd.Index(columns_new, tupleize_cols=True)

    if inplace:
        df.columns = columns_new
    else:
        df_new = df.copy()
        df_new.columns = columns_new
        return df_new

So just

>>> df = pd.DataFrame([[1,2,3], [10,20,30], [100,200,300]])
>>> df.columns = pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples((("a", "b"), ("a", "c"), ("d", "f")))
>>> rename_columns(df, columns={('d', 'f'): ('e', 'g')})
...      a         e
...      b    c    g
... 0    1    2    3
... 1   10   20   30
... 2  100  200  300

What does the pandas-team think about this? Why is this behavior not default?

2
  • This only seems to allow you to change the 2nd level, so if you wanted to change, say ("a", "c") to ("b", "c"), this doesn't work. I'm not sure why not, but I have a particular use case that needs this treatment. Any clue? Commented Nov 11, 2022 at 2:39
  • I had to go the long way around: pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples( [("b", "c") if t == ("a", "c") else t for t in pd.MultiIndex.from_tuples(df.columns)]). Commented Nov 11, 2022 at 2:43
6

Another way to do that is with pandas.Series.map and a lambda function as follows

df.columns = df.columns.map(lambda x: (x[0], "e") if x[1] == "f" else x)

[Out]:
     a         d
     b    c    e
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300
1
  • 2
    This answer is under-rated
    – Shadi
    Commented Nov 30, 2022 at 14:17
3

Using dicts to rename tuples

Since multi-index stores values as tuples, and python dicts accept tuples as keys and values, we can replace them using a dict.

mapping_dict = {("d","f"):("d","e")}

# Dictionary allows using tuples as keys and values
def rename_tuple(tuple_, dict_):
    """Replaces tuple if present in tuple dict"""
    if tuple_ in dict_.keys():
        return dict_[tuple_]
    return tuple_

# Rename chosen elements from list of tuples from df.columns
altered_index_list = [rename_tuple(tuple_,mapping_dict) for tuple_ in df.columns.to_list()]

# Update columns with new renamed columns
df.columns = pd.Index(altered_index_list)

Which returns the intended df

     a         d
     b    c    e
0    1    2    3
1   10   20   30
2  100  200  300

Aggregating in a function

This could then be aggregated in a function to simplify things

def rename_multi_index(index,mapper):
    """Renames pandas multi_index"""
    return pd.Index([rename_tuple(tuple_,mapper) for tuple_ in index])

# And now simply do
df.columns = rename_multi_index(df.columns,mapping_dict)

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