7

I start with a data frame like

print(df)
                   int          float  _i
1                    2   2.000000e+00   1
3                    3   3.000000e+00   3
2                    3   4.000000e+00   2
4 -9223372036854775808 -1.797693e+308   4
0 -9223372036854775808   1.000000e+00   0

If I use sort_values to sort by two columns I get the output you see below. So sort_values seems to do nothing. If I only one column name it works, and the way I use it worked in previous pandas versions. Is there any change in pandas I'm not aware of ?

print(df.sort_values(["int", "float"]))
                   int          float  _i
1                    2   2.000000e+00   1
3                    3   3.000000e+00   3
2                    3   4.000000e+00   2
4 -9223372036854775808 -1.797693e+308   4
0 -9223372036854775808   1.000000e+00   0

In pandas 0.17.0 I get:

print(df.sort_values(["int", "float"]))
                   int          float  _i
4 -9223372036854775808 -1.797693e+308   4
0 -9223372036854775808   1.000000e+00   0
1                    2   2.000000e+00   1
3                    3   3.000000e+00   3
2                    3   4.000000e+00   2
  • 1
    In addition to this, apparently if you interchange the two column names, you get two different o/ps (v0.19.1) – Nickil Maveli Dec 19 '16 at 15:03
  • I'm seeing this with 0.18.1 too. – sparc_spread Dec 19 '16 at 15:05
  • 1
    OK, I see the problem, it looks like the large negative int value is throwing off the sorting mechanism, sorting on the float column works correctly and as expected – EdChum Dec 19 '16 at 15:11
  • 1
    If this helps: I used the minimal value of int64 here. – rocksportrocker Dec 19 '16 at 15:14
  • 3
    Fixed here: github.com/pandas-dev/pandas/commit/… – rocksportrocker Dec 31 '16 at 9:32
-1

I'm able to get the sorting you desire for your case by calling the sort as follows:

print(df.sort_values(by=["int", "float"], na_position='first'))

                   int          float  _i
3 -9223372036854775808 -1.797693e+308   4
4 -9223372036854775808   1.000000e+00   0
0                    2   2.000000e+00   1
1                    3   3.000000e+00   3
2                    3   4.000000e+00   2

However, I'm not sure why the sorting is behaving different between the two versions. I checked the GitHub source code and I didn't see any changes to the sort_values function between those two versions. It could be that something deeper in the code has changed.

Code that does sorting:

2968                if len(by) > 1:
2968                from pandas.core.groupby import _lexsort_indexer
2969    
2970                def trans(v):
2971                    if com.needs_i8_conversion(v):
2972                        return v.view('i8')
2973                    return v
2974                keys = []
2975                for x in by:
2976                    k = self[x].values
2977                    if k.ndim == 2:
2978                        raise ValueError('Cannot sort by duplicate column %s' % str(x))
2979                    keys.append(trans(k))
2980                indexer = _lexsort_indexer(keys, orders=ascending,
2981                                           na_position=na_position)
2982                indexer = com._ensure_platform_int(indexer)

3004        new_data = self._data.take(indexer, axis=self._get_block_manager_axis(axis),
3005                                       convert=False, verify=False)

Something with _lexsort_indexer() or self._data.take() may have changed.

| improve this answer | |
  • I committed a bug fix to pandas already. And for some reasons the value 9223372036854775808 which is the smallest 64 bit int is/was treated as "missing value". I assume this was done when implementing the datetime64 datatype, where this specific value is officially named "NaT" (not a time) similar to "NaN" for float. – rocksportrocker Jan 19 '17 at 12:50
  • Here is the fix: github.com/pandas-dev/pandas/commit/… – rocksportrocker Jan 19 '17 at 12:51
  • You're fast! Thank you! – Alex Luis Arias Jan 19 '17 at 14:38

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