8

Consider a set of numbers:

In [8]: import numpy as np

In [9]: x = np.array([np.random.random() for i in range(10)])

In [10]: x
Out[10]: 
array([ 0.62594394,  0.03255799,  0.7768568 ,  0.03050498,  0.01951657,
        0.04767246,  0.68038553,  0.60036203,  0.3617409 ,  0.80294355])

Now I want to transform this set into another set y in the following way: for every element i in x, the corresponding element j in y would be the number of other elements in x which are less than i. For example, the above given x would look like:

In [25]: y
Out[25]: array([ 6.,  2.,  8.,  1.,  0.,  3.,  7.,  5.,  4.,  9.])

Now, I can do this using simple python loops:

In [16]: for i in range(len(x)):
    ...:     tot = 0
    ...:     for j in range(len(x)):
    ...:         if x[i] > x[j]: tot += 1
    ...:     y[i] = int(tot)

However, when length of x is very large, the code becomes extremely slow. I was wondering if any numpy magic can be brought to rescue. For example, if I had to filter all the elements less than 0.5, I would have simply used a Boolean masking:

In [19]: z = x[x < 0.5]

In [20]: z
Out[20]: array([ 0.03255799,  0.03050498,  0.01951657,  0.04767246,  0.3617409 ])

Can something like this be used so that the same thing could be achieved much faster?

  • Note that your input is just np.random.rand(10). – Andras Deak Dec 20 '16 at 12:18
  • @AndrasDeak : I didn't get you. – Peaceful Dec 20 '16 at 12:18
  • Try x = np.random.rand(10) and you'll see that you don't have to call random() in a list comp:) – Andras Deak Dec 20 '16 at 12:19
  • Yes of course! Thanks :) My real data is not random though. – Peaceful Dec 20 '16 at 12:20
11

What you actually need to do is get the inverse of the sorting order of your array:

import numpy as np
x = np.random.rand(10)
y = np.empty(x.size,dtype=np.int64)
y[x.argsort()] = np.arange(x.size)

Example run (in ipython):

In [367]: x
Out[367]: 
array([ 0.09139335,  0.29084225,  0.43560987,  0.92334644,  0.09868977,
        0.90202354,  0.80905083,  0.4801967 ,  0.99086213,  0.00933582])

In [368]: y
Out[368]: array([1, 3, 4, 8, 2, 7, 6, 5, 9, 0])

Alternatively, if you want to get the number of elements greater than each corresponding element in x, you have to reverse the sorting from ascending to descending. One possible option to do this is to simply swap the construction of the indexing:

y_rev = np.empty(x.size,dtype=np.int64)
y_rev[x.argsort()] = np.arange(x.size)[::-1]

another, as @unutbu suggested in a comment, is to map the original array to the new one:

y_rev = x.size - y - 1
  • 1
    Or just argsort two times : x.argsort().argsort()? – Divakar Dec 20 '16 at 12:25
  • 1
    @Divakar: y[np.argsort(x)] = np.arange(x.size) is faster – unutbu Dec 20 '16 at 12:28
  • 1
    @AndrasDeak: Or, the OP could keep the example, but change the text to read, "y would be the number of other elements in x which are greater than i". – unutbu Dec 20 '16 at 12:34
  • 1
    @AndrasDeak: I think your answer is correct. It is consistent with the text of the OP's question, and his for-loop code. It is the example that should be changed. – unutbu Dec 20 '16 at 12:40
  • 1
    My fault. I wrote the wrong y :) Corrected now! – Peaceful Dec 20 '16 at 12:42
5

Here's one approach using np.searchsorted -

np.searchsorted(np.sort(x),x)

Another one mostly based on @Andras Deak's solution using argsort() -

x.argsort().argsort()

Sample run -

In [359]: x
Out[359]: 
array([ 0.62594394,  0.03255799,  0.7768568 ,  0.03050498,  0.01951657,
        0.04767246,  0.68038553,  0.60036203,  0.3617409 ,  0.80294355])

In [360]: np.searchsorted(np.sort(x),x)
Out[360]: array([6, 2, 8, 1, 0, 3, 7, 5, 4, 9])

In [361]: x.argsort().argsort()
Out[361]: array([6, 2, 8, 1, 0, 3, 7, 5, 4, 9])
  • I added some timings if you're interested. – piRSquared Jan 9 '17 at 21:35
2

In addition to the other answers another solution using boolean indexing could be:

sum(x > i for i in x)

For your example:

In [10]: x
Out[10]: 
array([ 0.62594394,  0.03255799,  0.7768568 ,  0.03050498,  0.01951657,
        0.04767246,  0.68038553,  0.60036203,  0.3617409 ,  0.80294355])

In [10]: y = sum(x > i for i in x)
In [11]: y
Out[10]: array([6, 2, 8, 1, 0, 3, 7, 5, 4, 9])
  • 1
    In a vectorized way : (x[:,None] > x).sum(1). – Divakar Dec 20 '16 at 12:46
2

I wanted to contribute to this post by providing some testing on @Andras Deak's solution versus argsort again.


It would appear that argsort again is quicker for short arrays. Simple idea is to evaluate what is the length of array in which we see the balance shift.

I'll define three functions

  • construct which is Andras Deak's solution
  • argsortagain which is obvious
  • attempted_optimal which trades off at len(a) == 400

functions

def argsortagain(s):
    return s.argsort()

def construct(s):
    u = np.empty(s.size, dtype=np.int64)
    u[s] = np.arange(s.size)

    return u

def attempted_optimal(s):
    return argsortagain(s) if len(s) < 400 else construct(s)

testing

results = pd.DataFrame(
    index=pd.RangeIndex(10, 610, 10, 'len'),
    columns=pd.Index(['construct', 'argsortagain', 'attempted_optimal'], name='function'))

for i in results.index:
    a = np.random.rand(i)
    s = a.argsort()
    for j in results.columns:
        results.set_value(
            i, j,
            timeit(
                '{}(s)'.format(j),
                'from __main__ import {}, s'.format(j),
                number=10000)
        )

results.plot()

enter image description here

conclusion

attempted_optimal does what its supposed to do. But I'm not sure it's worth it for the marginal benefit gained in a spectrum of array length (sub 400) where it hardly matters. I'd advocate fully for constructed only.

This analysis helped me reach this conclusion.

  • 2
    Good middleground! – Divakar Jan 9 '17 at 21:42

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