I am new in reactjs and I have a little project in reactjs to play with and learn it. I need to have to type of headers which will be shown based on url paths. So the following is my index.js which handles the routing:

 const history = useRouterHistory(createHistory)({
     basename: '/test'
})
class Tj extends React.Component {

render() {

    return (
        <Router history={history}>
            <Route path={"/"} component={Bridge} >
                <IndexRoute component={Home} />
                <Route path={"user"} component={T} />
                <Route path={"home"} component={Home} />
            </Route>
            <Route path={"/t/"} component={Bridge2} >
                <IndexRoute component={T} />
                <Route path={"contact"} component={Home} />
            </Route>
        </Router>
    );
}
}
render(
<Provider store={store}>
    <Tj/>
</Provider>,
window.document.getElementById('mainContainer'));

As you can see I am using test as a root directory and based on user's input for url I decide which header should I use. Also here is Bridge2.js:

export class Bridge2 extends React.Component {
render() {

    return (
        <div>
            <div className="row">
                <Header2/>
            </div>
            <div className="row">
                {this.props.children}
            </div>
        </div>
    );
}
}

and Bridge.js:

export class Bridge extends React.Component {
render() {
  //  alert(this.props.children.type);
    var Content;

    if(this.props.children.type){
    Content=<div>
        <div className="row">
            <Header/>
        </div>
        <div className="row">
            {this.props.children}
        </div>
    </div>;
    }
    else{
        Content=<div>
            <div className="row">
                <Header/>
            </div>
            <div className="row">
                {this.props.children}
            </div>
        </div>;
    }
    return (
        Content
    );
}
}

When I run this in webpack dev server every thing works fine. For instance when I use http://localhost:3003/test/ bridge.js is loaded and if I run http://localhost:3003/test/t/ bridge2.js is loaded which is expected.

However since web pack dev server is not a production server I use tomcat and for now I use the eclipse web application project and I copied my bundle.js file and index.html over there. Now the problem is when I run the tomcat server it is able to recognize and show this path fine:

http://localhost:8080/test/ but when for http://localhost:8080/test/t/ I get:

HTTP Status 404 - /test/t/

which basically says the resource file is not available. As far as what I observe this is not a problem in coding since routing works fine in web pack dev server but when it comes to tomcat it seems that react routing is not able to handle it. Is there anything wrong with what I am doing? Is doable this way at all? Can anyone help?

up vote 28 down vote accepted

First you must be aware of the following differences when using react-router.

When you enter 'localhost:3003/test/' in your browser, it will request the server, and then it will receive /test/index.html, the js bundle, css, ...

After that, whenever you click an internal link (eg. 'localhost:3003/test/t/'), your browser will not request the server again.

React-router will resolve this client-side, re-render portions of the page, and update browser's address bar (using html5 pushstate), without triggering another server request.

When you enter 'localhost:3003/test/t/' directly in the address bar, your browser will request the server, and Tomcat does not have /test/t/index.html or so, and it returns a 404. It's because Tomcat doesn't know anything about react-redux nor javascript.

A way to handle this is to configure 404 errors to be forward to /test/index.html. It's probably how your webpack dev server is configured by default.

There is plenty of examples of doing this on apache, if you have one in front of our Tomcat. Search for "html5 pushstate apache config".

Here is one example

httpd.conf

...
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteBase /
    RewriteRule ^index\.html$ - [L]
    RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
    RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
    RewriteRule . /index.html [L]
 </IfModule>
...

If you are using tomcat alone, you may try to specify this in the web.xml, inside your war file.

...
<error-page>
    <error-code>404</error-code>
    <location>/index.html</location>
</error-page>
...

Note that this is not a react-route specific problem, every app that uses html5 pushstate needs to handle this somehow. Javascript servers may handle this more seamlessly though.

My solution is like a workaround for JSP engines (e.g. Tomcat), but it works great with minimal code.

I created an "index.jsp" parallel to "index.html" (in the content root folder) with following code:

index.jsp

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html; charset=UTF-8"
pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@include file="index.html"%>

I configured all urls to redirect to this JSP in web.xml

web.xml

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>index</servlet-name>
    <jsp-file>index.jsp</jsp-file>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>index</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

Now any URL requested to Tomcat will internally get redirected to index.jsp that is effectively index.html. Once react-router loads in browser, it takes care of rendering the right component and subsequent requests.

  • 1
    yeah, this is also a good solution! – user8202629 Sep 4 '17 at 12:25

While I am not familiar with Tomcat, what is most likely happening is that your server is looking for a /test/t or /test/t/index.html file, and since none exists, it is returning a 404 error.

When you use a browser history, you need to have a server that can handle routing. Typically this will be a wildcard (*) route that returns your index.html file (which in turn will return your bundled js as well as any other static files included in the index file).

One solution is to switch to using a hash router. If you are not able to do routing on the server (particularly relevant for people hosting static content), then hash routing is necessary. However, because you are using a server, you should be able to setup routing that will allow you to use a browser router.

As I said before, I am not familiar with Tomcat, so I will just describe what the configuration should be.

  1. All requests for static files should be served regularly.
  2. All other requests to /test/* (where * is any URL) should serve your index.html file.
  • Hi Paul thanks for answering. The problem here is /test/t/ exists in my case and web pack dev server is able to handle it properly so I do not need to redirect it. However when I run this in tomcat web server I get the problem. – Hamed Minaee Dec 20 '16 at 18:06
  • There is a /test/t file on your server? – Paul S Dec 20 '16 at 18:31
  • Ahhh no there is not any actual file on server. I meant the componets such as Home and T exists. But if I do the redirection to index.html on server when a url of test/t is hit then how can I use this: <Route path={"/t/"} component={Bridge2} > This way whenever user put test/t/ he will be redirected to the index.htl and header menu not header2.js. Am I right? – Hamed Minaee Dec 20 '16 at 19:32
  • You don't want to redirect, you just want to make sure to serve the index.html file. On the client side, React Router will look at window.location.pathname and determine which route(s) to render. – Paul S Dec 20 '16 at 19:37
  • Thanks a lot Paul. Now I got it. – Hamed Minaee Dec 20 '16 at 19:51

I have the same problem routing not working. If 404 not redirecting and loading the index.html problem. I tried several ways and finally found a solution which fixed my problem.

This worked for me on Tomcat 8

inside ROOT folder of Tomcat make a new folder WEB-INF and create web.xml 

You can do this by

sudo gedit /opt/tomcat/webapps/ROOT/WEB-INF/web.xml

paste the below in the web.xml

<!DOCTYPE web-app PUBLIC
 "-//Sun Microsystems, Inc.//DTD Web Application 2.3//EN"
 "http://java.sun.com/dtd/web-app_2_3.dtd" >

<web-app>
    <display-name>your_display_name</display-name>

    <error-page>
        <error-code>404</error-code>
        <location>/index.html</location>
    </error-page>

</web-app>

Restart the Tomcat. This fixed the routing problem for me. Hope this helps for someone I think. Thanks

I think an answer to the OP's question should address also the access to static resources via the default servlet.

In my understanding the problem appears in multi-view React applications where a Router is used to alter the page URL in order to reflect the state of the application. This is nice, but if you reload the page by accident you get 404 since there won't be any resource matching the altered URL. It also means such altered URLs can't be bookmarked as direct access to different application views. Unless, we get a little help from the server side.

There are more solutions possible, depending on how the access to static resources is handled, or the chosen implementation (filter, servlet or even JSP), but the basic idea is to serve the main application HTML file for every Routes defined in React.

Supposing you have you have two React Routes defined in your application:

<Route path={"view1"} component={View1} />
<Route path={"view2"} component={View2} />

You could create a RouterServlet to forward requests to /view1 or /view2 back to the context root (/), supposing you mapped the application here.

void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
        throws ServletException, IOException 
{
    request.getServletContext().getRequestDispatcher("/").forward(request, response);
}

You can configure it like this:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>RouterServlet</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>package.RouterServlet</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>RouterServlet</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/view1/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>RouterServlet</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/view2/*</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

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