-1

I thought I would have seen a noticeable performance difference between the use of a PDO statement and a PDO query when looping over a thousand records one-by-one.

I made the loop a thousand times for each of those, to get average results and they both reflect pretty much the same time (≈0.105 seconds). Why? I would have thought the prepared statement to be the fastest.

Here is the code I used for testing purposes:

$iter = 1000;
$idAry = range(1,1000);
$sumResultAry = array();

// [TEST1]
$func1 = function($id,array &$sumResultAry){
    list($dbCon,$DB,$TP) = AClass::retrieve_database_properties_();
    $sql = "
        SELECT 
            t1.id,
            t1.look_key
        FROM {$DB}.{$TP}test t1 
        WHERE 
            t1.id={$id} 
    ";

    if(false!==($result=$dbCon->query($sql))){
        if(false!==($row=$result->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))){
            $sumResultAry[] = $row['id'];
        }
    }
};

$wh = fopen('test','w');
if($wh){
    for($i=0;$i<$iter;++$i){
        $startTime = microtime(true);
        foreach($idAry as $id){
            $func1($id,$sumResultAry);
        }
        $endTime = number_format((microtime(true)-$startTime),4);
        fwrite($wh,$endTime . "\n");
    }

    fclose($wh);
}

$result = 0;

$rh = fopen('test','r');
if($rh){
    while(!feof($rh)){
        $line = trim(fgets($rh));
        if($line!==''){
            $result += floatval($line);
        }
    }

    fclose($rh);
}

echo '<pre>';
echo 'test query' . "\n\n";
echo 'time: ' . ($result/$iter) . ' seconds' . "\n\n";
echo '</pre>';
// [/TEST1]

// [TEST2]
$func2 = function($id,array &$sumResultAry){
    $key = 'test';
    $sqlStmt = null;
    if(null===($sqlStmt=AClass::return_sqlStatement_($key))){// retrieving statement if previously stored
        list($dbCon,$DB,$TP) = AClass::retrieve_database_properties_();
        $sql = "
            SELECT 
                t1.id,
                t1.look_key
            FROM {$DB}.{$TP}test t1 
            WHERE 
                t1.id=:id
        ";
        if(AClass::prepare_sqlStatement_($key,$sql)){// preparing and storing statement
            $sqlStmt = AClass::return_sqlStatement_($key);
        }
    }
    if(null!==$sqlStmt){
        if(false!==($sqlStmt->execute(array(':id'=>$id)))){
            if(false!==($row=$sqlStmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC))){
                $sumResultAry[] = $row['id'];
            }
        }
    }
};

$wh = fopen('test','w');
if($wh){
    for($i=0;$i<$iter;++$i){
        $startTime = microtime(true);
        foreach($idAry as $id){
            $func2($id,$sumResultAry);
        }
        $endTime = number_format((microtime(true)-$startTime),4);
        fwrite($wh,$endTime . "\n");
    }

    fclose($wh);
}

$result = 0;

$rh = fopen('test','r');
if($rh){
    while(!feof($rh)){
        $line = trim(fgets($rh));
        if($line!==''){
            $result += floatval($line);
        }
    }

    fclose($rh);
}

echo '<pre>';
echo 'test statement' . "\n\n";
echo 'time: ' . ($result/$iter) . ' seconds' . "\n\n";
echo '</pre>';
// [/TEST2]

Thanks to some of you, I now understand that I need to test with more complex queries to notice a significant performance difference between the two.

  • Per the great manual in the sky. "By using a prepared statement the application avoids repeating the analyze/compile/optimize cycle." php.net/manual/en/pdo.prepared-statements.php You're query is very simple so 1000 iterations of the analyze/compile/optimize cycle is negligible. Try a more complex query. (Add dependent sub-queries and etc. ) – bassxzero Dec 20 '16 at 19:35
  • @brassxzero Oh I see! So with a more complexe query I WOULD SEE a difference. I'll test further just to verify this I guess. I know these things have probably been tested a thousand times, but I just added a class that stores the prepared statements used through out my project and wanted to see if I was doing this the good way so I started testing it out. Thank you. – 4n0nym0u5 Dec 20 '16 at 19:40
  • 3
    Is there a question here? – Jay Blanchard Dec 20 '16 at 19:41
  • @bassxzero I've always referred to the process of running the analyze/compile/optimize cycle as 'determining the execution plan'. In mysql (assuming mysql or postgres) is this accurate proper language? – Ray Dec 20 '16 at 19:51
  • This is totally unclear. – Praveen Kumar Purushothaman Dec 20 '16 at 19:52
4
0

In any case, I'm not sure you'll see 'massive' performance differences unless you're running very many iterations.

Creating a prepared statement and submitting it with a set of parameters will take slightly more time than a static query (for a single query and set of parameters) for a single run of a query. By slightly, we're talking ballpark of milliseconds or fractions of milliseconds.

What you do get from prepared statements (if your database supports them) is:

  • SQL injection protection
  • Speedup when running the same query multiple times with different parameters (like in a loop) as the database only creates one execution plan. Typically you'd need to run quite a few executions to see anything noticeable.

If it's a quick, well-indexed query that itself takes only a few milliseconds to run, and has a trivial execution plan to build, you may need to run many thousands of requests to get any noticeable improvement with prepared statements over a static query.

So, just use prepared statements because it's better in general.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Ray I understand that this is the case for a single request. But what about multiple requests? – 4n0nym0u5 Dec 20 '16 at 19:32
  • @MarkBaker see my update – Ray Dec 20 '16 at 19:33
  • @4n0nym0u5 see my update. For repetitive requests on the same statement after a few requests you should see some improvement vs. running a static query again and again with different values – Ray Dec 20 '16 at 19:34
  • @Ray I knew about the facts you put in your answer, but my simple test was not reflecting these and I wondered why... But with the answer bassxzero gave me as a comment to my question, now I see that I need to put up a more complexe query to notice the performance difference between the two. I will still accept your answer, thank you. – 4n0nym0u5 Dec 20 '16 at 19:45
  • @4n0nym0u5 I had added info at the bottom of my answer which reflects pretty much what bassxzero notes in a comment to your OP about the time it takes mysql to construct an execution plan (the analyze/compile/optimize cycle constructs the execution plan) – Ray Dec 20 '16 at 19:49
0
0

Why am I not seeing the massive performance difference that I expect to see between prepared and non-prepared queries?

Because there isn't.

I don't know where did you get that idea, but nowhere a prepared statement gives you even significant performance difference, let alone a "massive" one. Even if used properly.

| improve this answer | |
  • So... Just to know what you think... Is it a good practice to use prepared statement whenever it's possible? Should they be stored if reused through different classes and methods? Thank you – 4n0nym0u5 Dec 22 '16 at 16:21
  • A good question. I think the gain doesn't worth the trouble. It will make your code A LOT more complicated with little to none gain. Besides, there is very little chance to reuse a prepared statment in PHP. – Your Common Sense Dec 22 '16 at 16:26
  • By the way I'll give a thorough read of your PDO tutorials. The use of PDO is still a bit new for me, was used to mysqli, but I do prefer PDO for their placeholders. – 4n0nym0u5 Dec 22 '16 at 16:29
  • Glad to help. Feel free to ask if you happen to have any questions – Your Common Sense Dec 22 '16 at 16:33

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.