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I have to read several files some in Excel format and some in CSV format. Some of the files have hundreds of columns.

Is there a way to select several ranges of columns without specifying all the column names or positions? For example something like selecting columns 1 -10, 15, 17 and 50-100:

df = df.ix[1:10, 15, 17, 50:100]

I need to know how to do this both when creating dataframe from Excel files and CSV files and after the data framers created.

3 Answers 3

91

use np.r_

np.r_[1:10, 15, 17, 50:100]

array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 15, 17, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55,
       56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72,
       73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89,
       90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99])

so you can do

df.iloc[:, np.r_[1:10, 15, 17, 50:100]]
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  • This also works for filtering rows. Very nice, thanks! Commented May 29, 2020 at 15:16
0

I find @piRSquared 's answer straightforward.

You may also use:

Locs = list(range(0,10)) + [14, 16] + list(range(49, 100))
# columns 1 -10, 15, 17 and 50-100
# [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 14, 16, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99]

df = df.iloc[:Locs]
-3

use inner join like result = pd.concat([df1, df4], axis=1, join="inner")

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  • 2
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply.
    – Yunnosch
    Commented Jun 21, 2022 at 20:22

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