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I have several similar classes inheriting from the same Base-Class/Interface (Base class 1), and they share a couple similar functions, but then also have their own distinct functions. They all also have their own member variables of different classes, and each of those inherits from the same Base-Class/Interface (Base class 2). Is it possible to define a variable in Base class 1, of type Base class 2, then in the actual implementation of classes using Base class 1, have the variable of type Base class 2 be its proper type. Kinda hard to explain, so simplified example below.

//Base-Class 1
class Shape
{
    public Shape() {}
    ShapeExtra m_var;

    //The common functions
    public GetVar(){ return m_var; }
}

class Circle : Shape
{
    public Circle() { m_var = new CircleExtra(); }

    public void CircleFunc()
    {
        m_var.CircleExtraFunc();
    }
}
class Triangle : Shape
{
    public Triangle() { m_var = new TriangleExtra(); }

    public void TriangleFunc()
    {
        m_var.TriangleExtraFunc();
    }
}
.
.
.



//Base_Class 2
class ShapeExtra
{
    public ShapeExtra() {}
}

class CircleExtra : ExtraClass
{
    public CircleExtra() {}
    void CircleExtraFunc() {//Do stuff}
}
class TriangleExtra : ExtraClass
{
    public TriangleExtra() {}
    void TriangleExtra() {//Do stuff}
}
.
.
.

So, I need the m_var in the child classes to be kept it as its own unique version. Because right now (w/o the extra CircleExtra m_var;), the GetVar() works, but in CircleFunc, m_var is still type of ShapeExtra, and thus doesn't know that CircleExtraFunc exists. I could cast m_var each time I wanted to do that, but that is repetitive and not worth it in my real-world case. Is there a way to utilize the functions in unique classes based off of ShapeExtra, while keeping the GetVar() function in Shape?

Please ask questions if there is anything I left out.

6
  • What is the question? – user1593881 Dec 21 '16 at 21:49
  • Added, "Is there a way to do this without casting each time?" – user6732861 Dec 21 '16 at 21:50
  • 2
    " I need the m_var in the child classes to be kept it as its own unique version." It already is. m_var in child classes has absolutely nothing to do with m_var in the base class. The base class has its own m_var, so does each child class. They are unique, and distinct. Unlike virtual functions, class members do not "override" members of the same name in the base class. Your question is unclear. – Sam Varshavchik Dec 21 '16 at 21:54
  • @RawN Is that better? – user6732861 Dec 21 '16 at 21:55
  • @SamVarshavchik Tried adding them as possible solution, removed to better fit the situation. RawN, updated, shouldn't be a duplicate – user6732861 Dec 21 '16 at 21:57
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Simply with inheritance and without using pointers it is not possible, as C++ is a statically-and-strictly-typed language.

You can inherit both the variable and the function, but you'll need to cast function return value.

You can also override the function to make it return the concrete type, but then you have to cast the variable inside the function.

You can also declare the same var with the concrete class in subclasses, but then you just hide the variable in the superclass and inherit nothing.

I'd rather go for a solution using templates. Make the type of the variable a template type and extend the template using a concrete type in subclasses. It'll work perfectly.

It's been a long time since I last programmed in C++ and I beg your pardon if there are errors in the following example. I'm sure you can easily make it work.

template <class S>
class Shape {
   S m_var;
   //......
public:
   S var () {
      return m_var;
   }
   //.......
}

class Circle: Shape <CircleExtra> {
   // var method returns CircleExtra
   //......
}

Edit: Regarding some comment, to allow virtual invocation of the method, it is possible to use correlated return types. Something like the following example.

class Shape {
public:
   virtual ShapeExtra *var () = 0;
}

template <typename SE>
class ConcreteShape: Shape {
public:
   virtual SE *var() {
      return &m_var;
   }
// Constructor, etc.

private:
   SE m_var;
}

Or some variation. Now concrete shapes can benefit from extending the template, as long as SE * is correlated with ShapeExtra * (the type parameter extends ShapeExtra). And you can vall the method transparently through Shape interface.

4
  • This approach does not allow scenarios where Shape is needed to be manipulated as the base class. – Kirill Kobelev Dec 22 '16 at 0:01
  • I think this is probably the best solution to my problem. Thank you for your help! – user6732861 Dec 22 '16 at 0:04
  • @KirillKobelev Shape is kinda an interface in my scenario, and won't ever be its own instance. I didn't completely specify that, sorry. – user6732861 Dec 22 '16 at 0:06
  • @KirillKobelev I add a suggestion to fulfill the need of virtual invocation through Shape class. – Juan Dec 22 '16 at 22:35
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Using pointers, this is totally possible. Using your example, you could do something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
using namespace std;

//Extras
class ShapeExtra
{
    public:
    ShapeExtra() {}
    void ShapeFunc() { std::cout << "Shape"; }
    virtual ~ShapeExtra() = default; //Important!
};

class Shape
{
    public:
    std::unique_ptr<ShapeExtra> m_var;

    //require a pointer on construction
    //make sure to document, that Shape class takes ownership and handles deletion
    Shape(ShapeExtra* p):m_var(p){}

    //The common functions
    ShapeExtra& GetVar(){ return *m_var; }
    void ShapeFunc() {m_var->ShapeFunc();}
};


class CircleExtra : public ShapeExtra
{
    public:
    void CircleExtraFunc() {std::cout << "Circle";}
};

class Circle : public Shape
{
    CircleExtra* m_var;

    public:
    Circle() : Shape(new CircleExtra()) {
        m_var = static_cast<CircleExtra*>(Shape::m_var.get()); 
    }

    void CircleFunc()
    {
        m_var->CircleExtraFunc();
    }
};


int main() {
    Circle c;
    //use the ShapeExtra Object
    c.GetVar().ShapeFunc();
    //call via forwarded function
    c.ShapeFunc();
    //call the circleExtra Function
    c.CircleFunc();
    return 0;
}

Test it on ideone

Note the use of pointers and a virtual destructor:

  • By using a virtual destructor in the ShapeExtra base class, you make it possible to destruct an object of any derived class, using a ShapeExtra*. This is important, because
  • by using a std::unique_ptr<ShapeExtra> instead of a plain C-pointer, we make sure that the object is properly deleted on destruction of Shape.
  • It is probably a good idea to document this behaviour, i.e. that Shape takes the ownership of the ShapeExtra*. Which especially means, that we do not delete CirleExtra* in the Circle destructor
  • I decided here to require the ShapeExtra* on construction, but its also possible to just use std::unique_ptr::reset() later and check for nullptr on dereferencing Shape::m_var
  • Construction order is this: On calling the constructor of Circle, we first create a new CircleExtra which we pass to Shape before finally the constructor of Circle is executed.
  • Destruction order is Circle first (was created last), then Shape which also destructs the ShapeExtra for us, including (via virtual function) the CircleExtra
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I would recommend the following approach:

class ShapeExtra
{
public:

    virtual ~ShapeExtra() { }
    virtual void SomeCommonShapeFunc() { std::cout << "Shape"; }
};

class Shape
{
public:

    virtual ShapeExtra &GetVar() = 0; // Accessor function.
};

Note that the class Shape does not have any data members at all. After that for each derived class you need:

class CircleExtra : public ShapeExtra
{
public:

    void SomeCommonShapeFunc() { std::cout << "Circle"; }
};

class Circle : public Shape
{
    CircleExtra m_var;   // Data member with circle specific class.

public:

    virtual ShapeExtra &GetVar() { return m_var; }
};

Implementation of virtual method in Circle will return reference to the base class ShapeExtra. This will allow using this extra in the base class.

Note that pointers and templates are not used at all. This simplifies the overall design.

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