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I'm wondering what the appropriate type signature is for g. The one I've got currently doesn't compile. I presume a forall. is needed somewhere but I'm not exactly sure where.

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

import Control.Monad.ST (ST, runST)

data D

class C t where
  type M t :: * -> *
  f :: t -> M t D

g :: (C t, M t ~ ST s) => t -> D
g x = runST (f x)

main = return ()

(Added example in response to comment by @cirdec)

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

import Control.Monad.ST (ST, runST)

data D = D

class C t where
  type M t :: * -> *
  f :: t -> M t D

data T (m :: (* -> *)) = T

instance (Monad m) => C (T m) where
  type M (T m) = m
  f _ = return D

main = const (return ()) (runST (f T))

I then replace main with the following:

g x = runST (f x)
main = const (return ()) (g T)

By the looks of it, this should compile, as g T == runST (f T) by definition of g. But it does not. I assume g needs a signature but I'm not sure what it is.

(Added background in response to comment by @cirdec)

Basically in my code C is a class of datatypes that can be treated as monadic disjoint Int sets (I know there are packages on hackage already but my approach has a few more features). C has functions like union and find etc. The actual implementation of these differ depending on whether the user knows their size at creation time or whether they need to dynamically grow, hence the type class. However once these data types are created they can be roughly treated the same. All this occurs in monad code, generally ST or IO, but technically anything that's in the MonadRef will suffice. Then C has a function freeze of result type M t D, where D is some result datatype. For example, for IO freeze will have the type (C t) => t -> IO D but for ST freeze will look more like (C t) => t -> ST s D. In the latter case, one should be able to run runST on the result of freeze to get the raw result data.

  • What are you trying to do? – Cirdec Dec 22 '16 at 5:47
  • runST required that it's argument is polymorphic in all possible s. runST :: (forall s. ST s a) -> a. You aren't allowed to choose anything about s. If it meant anything, how could the constraint M t ~ ST s ever be satisfied? – Cirdec Dec 22 '16 at 6:27
  • This question needs the compiler error message and probably needs an example of an instance of C – Cirdec Dec 22 '16 at 6:29
  • I've fixed my attempt at the type signature for t, but my point is that it's wrong (and still wrong). One instance of C shouldn't affect things because the g is intended to work on all instances of C but I'll try to write a dummy one if you like. – Clinton Dec 22 '16 at 6:31
  • Got an example of what t is for ST? I'll bet M t :: Identity. – Cirdec Dec 22 '16 at 6:43
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The following file compiles for me:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}
{-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-}
{-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-}
{-# LANGUAGE PolyKinds #-}

import Control.Monad.ST (ST, runST)

data D = D

class C t where
  type M t :: * -> *
  f :: t -> M t D

data T (m :: (* -> *)) = T

instance (Monad m) => C (T m) where
  type M (T m) = m
  f _ = return D

data Equal a b where Refl :: Equal a a

convert :: Equal f g -> f a -> g a
convert Refl v = v

data Box s where
    Box :: C t => Equal (M t) (ST s) -> t -> Box s

g :: (forall s. Box s) -> D
g box = runST (case box of Box eq x -> convert eq (f x))

main = const (return ()) (g (Box Refl T))
  • Cheers Daniel. After mucking around with this for a while I figured I needed to box it in a GADT somehow. Can you comment roughly as a general guideline of when you need to wrap a rank-n type in a GADT? – Clinton Dec 22 '16 at 8:22
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    @Clinton When in doubt. =) – Daniel Wagner Dec 22 '16 at 8:30
  • Btw, I've had a closer look at your code now, and it sure is bizarre. That Equal data type I can't imagine how you came up with that. – Clinton Dec 22 '16 at 12:55
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    @Clinton Oh, that's easy: I cheated! Somebody else came up with it ages ago, and I copied. In an earlier version, I had written Box :: (C t, M t ~ ST s) => ... and I noticed that it was having trouble choosing that type equality to do conversions with, so I added a term-level representation that I could refer to to give it some help. – Daniel Wagner Dec 22 '16 at 19:38
  • @Clinton Equal is found in Data.Type.Equality under the name (:~:) with recent versions of GHC. Anyways, such a type is an anti-pattern regardless of if you write it with :~: or with primitive equality constraints (which @Daniel Wagner has already pointed out causes difficulties - this is the first hint that this is the wrong direction). Based on "depending on whether the user knows their size at creation time or whether they need to dynamically grow" - you just want an indexed type, not a type which existentially quantifies a typeclass contraint. – user2407038 Dec 23 '16 at 1:42

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