13

I am getting a social security number (SSN) from a data warehouse. While posting it to a CRM I want it to be formatted like XXX-XX-XXXX instead of XXXXXXXXX.

It's like converting a simple string with dashes at positions 4 and 7. I am pretty new to C#, so what is the best way to do this?

43

Check out the String.Insert method.

string formattedSSN = unformattedSSN.Insert(5, "-").Insert(3, "-");
  • 1
    Tricky. It is interesting to note that the "obvious" answer of doing it like this (note my reversal of 3 and 5 compared to yours): unformattedSSN.Insert(3,"-").Insert(5,"-"); would yield 123-4-56789 rather than 123-45-6789. So, you are, in effect inserting dashes from back to front. – wageoghe Nov 8 '10 at 21:51
  • Yeah, you could do it forwards instead of backwards, but then you'd have to account for the extra dash that you inserted. – GendoIkari Nov 8 '10 at 21:53
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    @Gendolkari This is a fine example of a situation where a fluent interface is poor. As you have acknowledged, George's solution is clearer and easier to verify. – David Heffernan Jan 12 '11 at 20:24
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    George's solution fails when the SSN is stored as a string, which is specified in the question. – mdelvecchio Jul 4 '14 at 19:40
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    @mdelvecchio I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure Casey was being sarcastic and agreeing with you. – GendoIkari Dec 21 '15 at 3:16
50

For a simple, short, and self commenting solution, try:

String.Format("{0:000-00-0000}", 123456789) 

123456789 representing your SSN variable.

  • You have an extra # in the middle. Other than that, +1 because it's much more elegant than my solution. – GendoIkari Nov 8 '10 at 21:35
  • 3
    Close, but you need "{0:000-00-0000}" instead of '#' to allow for leading zeroes (or "{0:00#-##-####}" etc.). – tnyfst Nov 8 '10 at 21:50
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    You are assuming that the data is coming in a numeric form. I am not sure how SSN data is typically kept but I would have expected a 9 character string rather than a numerical value given the specification for the first 3 chars includes leading zeroes. If the former then you would need to add in a string->numeric conversion (or is there an implicit one?). – Peter M Nov 8 '10 at 22:22
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    This does not seem to work if your SSN is stored as a string... – Serj Sagan Dec 26 '13 at 17:49
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    yeah this fails -- the question specifies the SSN value is a string, and this solution will not work on a string. – mdelvecchio Jul 4 '14 at 19:41
4
string ssn = "123456789";

string formattedSSN = string.Join("-", 
                                  ssn.Substring(0,3), 
                                  ssn.Substring(4,2), 
                                  ssn.Substring(6,4));

@George's option is probably cleaner if the SSN is stored as a numeric rather than as a string.

1

Just in case this helps someone, here is a method I created to mask and format a SSN:

USAGE:

string ssn = "123456789";
string masked = MaskSsn(ssn); // returns xxx-xx-6789

CODE:

public static string MaskSsn(string ssn, int digitsToShow = 4, char maskCharacter = 'x')
{
    if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(ssn)) return String.Empty;

    const int ssnLength = 9;
    const string separator = "-";
    int maskLength = ssnLength - digitsToShow;

    // truncate and convert to number
    int output = Int32.Parse(ssn.Replace(separator, String.Empty).Substring(maskLength, digitsToShow));

    string format = String.Empty;
    for (int i = 0; i < maskLength; i++) format += maskCharacter;
    for (int i = 0; i < digitsToShow; i++) format += "0";

    format = format.Insert(3, separator).Insert(6, separator);
    format = "{0:" + format + "}";

    return String.Format(format, output);
}
0

Without data validation and assuming that you only get 9 character string, I would go with something like this -

return s.Substring(0, 3) + "-" + s.Substring(3, 2) + "-" + s.Substring(5, 4);

But...I am also pretty new...so GendoIkari's answer is soo much better.

0

Above answer might be raise exception when string not fixed length.

In my case I used following way SSN formating and its working.

string SSN = "56245789";
if (SSN.Length > 3 && SSN <= 5)
      SSN = SSN.Insert(3, "-");
else if (SSN.Length > 5)
      SSN = SSN.Insert(5, "-").Insert(3, "-");

Hence SSN will get 562-45-789.

protected by Community Jan 25 '16 at 18:18

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