330

Is there a way to change the type of interface property defined in a *.d.ts in typescript?

for example: An interface in x.d.ts is defined as

interface A {
  property: number;
}

I want to change it in the typescript files that I write to

interface A {
  property: Object;
}

or even this would work

interface B extends A {
  property: Object;
}

Will this approach work? It didn't work when I tried on my system. Just want to confirm if it's even possible?

0

14 Answers 14

666

I use a method that first filters the fields and then combines them.

reference Exclude property from type

interface A {
    x: string
}

export type B = Omit<A, 'x'> & { x: number };

for interface:

interface A {
    x: string
}

interface B extends Omit<A, 'x'> {
  x: number
}
7
  • 13
    It's great to know this. But the problem is it's still not modifying the existing one.
    – Freewind
    Oct 4, 2018 at 12:07
  • 34
    This was exactly what I was looking for. It's how I expected the typescript extend to work by default, but alas, this little Omit fixes everything 🙌
    – Dawson B
    Jul 20, 2019 at 15:55
  • 2
    Extending the interface was exactly what I was looking for, thanks!
    – mhodges
    Nov 21, 2019 at 23:15
  • 3
    Note: You'll need typescript 3.5.3 above to use this.
    – Vixson
    Jul 11, 2020 at 5:51
  • Can you still use "B" where "A" is expected? I have 2 types, "ModelShared" and "ModelServer", and a field serverOnly. I want server-only to never exist in ModelShared, so I use {serverOnly: never} => that's excellent for developer experience, they can immediately tell that the field exist, but they should use ModelServer instead. But I still have a lot of functions that expect a generic ModelShared object. However, all listed answers seems to break inheritance: if you try to pass a ModelServer, you get issues, while those types are actually related. I ended up using 3 interfaces.
    – Eric Burel
    Sep 24, 2021 at 13:51
202
+300
 type ModifiedType = Modify<OriginalType, {
  a: number;
  b: number;
}>
 
interface ModifiedInterface extends Modify<OriginalType, {
  a: number;
  b: number;
}> {}

Inspired by ZSkycat's extends Omit solution, I came up with this:

type Modify<T, R> = Omit<T, keyof R> & R;

// before typescript@3.5
type Modify<T, R> = Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, keyof R>> & R

Example:

interface OriginalInterface {
  a: string;
  b: boolean;
  c: number;
}

type ModifiedType  = Modify<OriginalInterface , {
  a: number;
  b: number;
}>

// ModifiedType = { a: number; b: number; c: number; }

Going step by step:

type R0 = Omit<OriginalType, 'a' | 'b'>        // { c: number; }
type R1 = R0 & {a: number, b: number }         // { a: number; b: number; c: number; }

type T0 = Exclude<'a' | 'b' | 'c' , 'a' | 'b'> // 'c'
type T1 = Pick<OriginalType, T0>               // { c: number; }
type T2 = T1 & {a: number, b: number }         // { a: number; b: number; c: number; }

TypeScript Utility Types


v2.0 Deep Modification

interface Original {
  a: {
    b: string
    d: {
      e: string // <- will be changed
    }
  }
  f: number
}

interface Overrides {
  a: {
    d: {
      e: number
      f: number // <- new key
    }
  }
  b: {         // <- new key
    c: number
  }
}

type ModifiedType = ModifyDeep<Original, Overrides>
interface ModifiedInterface extends ModifyDeep<Original, Overrides> {}
// ModifiedType =
{
  a: {
    b: string
    d: {
      e: number
      f: number
    }
  }
  b: {
    c: number
  }
  f: number
}

Find ModifyDeep below.

5
  • 2
    Noob here but you're change from an interface to a type in your example no? Or is there no difference?
    – Dominic
    Jan 3, 2020 at 16:40
  • 2
    @Dominic Good point, I have updated the answer. Two Interfaces with same name can merge. typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/…
    – Qwerty
    Jan 6, 2020 at 8:35
  • This should become a TS feature Apr 15, 2021 at 7:03
  • What is Modify here?
    – user11703419
    Nov 25, 2021 at 19:09
  • 1
    @Donnovan It's a custom type, go through the answer again find -> type Modify<T, R> = Omit<T, keyof R> & R;
    – Qwerty
    Nov 29, 2021 at 10:35
76

You can't change the type of an existing property.

You can add a property:

interface A {
    newProperty: any;
}

But changing a type of existing one:

interface A {
    property: any;
}

Results in an error:

Subsequent variable declarations must have the same type. Variable 'property' must be of type 'number', but here has type 'any'

You can of course have your own interface which extends an existing one. In that case, you can override a type only to a compatible type, for example:

interface A {
    x: string | number;
}

interface B extends A {
    x: number;
}

By the way, you probably should avoid using Object as a type, instead use the type any.

In the docs for the any type it states:

The any type is a powerful way to work with existing JavaScript, allowing you to gradually opt-in and opt-out of type-checking during compilation. You might expect Object to play a similar role, as it does in other languages. But variables of type Object only allow you to assign any value to them - you can’t call arbitrary methods on them, even ones that actually exist:

let notSure: any = 4;
notSure.ifItExists(); // okay, ifItExists might exist at runtime
notSure.toFixed(); // okay, toFixed exists (but the compiler doesn't check)

let prettySure: Object = 4;
prettySure.toFixed(); // Error: Property 'toFixed' doesn't exist on type 'Object'.
54

The short answer for lazy people like me:

type Overrided = Omit<YourInterface, 'overrideField'> & { overrideField: <type> }; 
interface Overrided extends Omit<YourInterface, 'overrideField'> {
  overrideField: <type>
}
43

Extending @zSkycat's answer a little, you can create a generic that accepts two object types and returns a merged type with the members of the second overriding the members of the first.

type Omit<T, K extends keyof T> = Pick<T, Exclude<keyof T, K>>
type Merge<M, N> = Omit<M, Extract<keyof M, keyof N>> & N;

interface A {
    name: string;
    color?: string;
}

// redefine name to be string | number
type B = Merge<A, {
    name: string | number;
    favorite?: boolean;
}>;

let one: A = {
    name: 'asdf',
    color: 'blue'
};

// A can become B because the types are all compatible
let two: B = one;

let three: B = {
    name: 1
};

three.name = 'Bee';
three.favorite = true;
three.color = 'green';

// B cannot become A because the type of name (string | number) isn't compatible
// with A even though the value is a string
// Error: Type {...} is not assignable to type A
let four: A = three;
2
  • 2
    Very cool :-) I've done this before with one or two properties with Omit, but this is much cooler :-) I often want to 'extend' a server entity type and change some things to be required or optional on the client. Jan 23, 2019 at 4:37
  • 1
    This should be the accepted solution now. Cleanest way to "extend" an interface.
    – manuhortet
    Jul 24, 2019 at 9:35
29

Omit the property when extending the interface:

interface A {
  a: number;
  b: number;
}

interface B extends Omit<A, 'a'> {
  a: boolean;
}
11

I have created this type that allows me to easily override nested interfaces:

type ModifyDeep<A extends AnyObject, B extends DeepPartialAny<A>> = {
  [K in keyof A]: B[K] extends never
    ? A[K]
    : B[K] extends AnyObject
      ? ModifyDeep<A[K], B[K]>
      : B[K]
} & (A extends AnyObject ? Omit<B, keyof A> : A)

/** Makes each property optional and turns each leaf property into any, allowing for type overrides by narrowing any. */
type DeepPartialAny<T> = {
  [P in keyof T]?: T[P] extends AnyObject ? DeepPartialAny<T[P]> : any
}

type AnyObject = Record<string, any>

And then you can use it like that:

interface Original {
  a: {
    b: string
    d: {
      e: string // <- will be changed
    }
  }
  f: number
}

interface Overrides {
  a: {
    d: {
      e: number
      f: number // <- new key
    }
  }
  b: {         // <- new key
    c: number
  }
}

type ModifiedType = ModifyDeep<Original, Overrides>
interface ModifiedInterface extends ModifyDeep<Original, Overrides> {}
// ModifiedType =
{
  a: {
    b: string
    d: {
      e: number
      f: number
    }
  }
  b: {
    c: number
  }
  f: number
}
4
  • Cannot find name Obj.
    – Qwerty
    Jun 9, 2021 at 10:35
  • I was creating a deep modification type myself and I could not make it work without your DeepPartialAny. Otherwise I converged to basically the same solution as you, so I decided to not include my version in my answer, but instead update and improve yours.
    – Qwerty
    Jun 11, 2021 at 0:38
  • This is really hard to follow. Do you think you could make the code a little more verbose? Aug 9, 2021 at 7:53
  • I was able to get a less robust (but tolerable) version of this working like so Aug 9, 2021 at 8:26
8

For narrowing the type of the property, simple extend works perfect, as in Nitzan's answer:

interface A {
    x: string | number;
}

interface B extends A {
    x: number;
}

For widening, or generally overriding the type, you can do Zskycat's solution:

interface A {
    x: string
}

export type B = Omit<A, 'x'> & { x: number };

But, if your interface A is extending a general interface, you will lose the custom types of A's remaining properties when using Omit.

e.g.

interface A extends Record<string | number, number | string | boolean> {
    x: string;
    y: boolean;
}

export type B = Omit<A, 'x'> & { x: number };

let b: B = { x: 2, y: "hi" }; // no error on b.y! 

The reason is, Omit internally only goes over Exclude<keyof A, 'x'> keys which will be the general string | number in our case. So, B would become {x: number; } and accepts any extra property with the type of number | string | boolean.


To fix that, I came up with a different OverrideProps utility type as following:

type OverrideProps<M, N> = { [P in keyof M]: P extends keyof N ? N[P] : M[P] };

Example:

type OverrideProps<M, N> = { [P in keyof M]: P extends keyof N ? N[P] : M[P] };

interface A extends Record<string | number, number | string | boolean> {
    x: string;
    y: boolean;
}

export type B = OverrideProps<A, { x: number }>;

let b: B = { x: 2, y: "hi" }; // error: b.y should be boolean!
4
  • 1
    If you add & N to your OverrideProps type, I think it will also support new props only in N. Or maybe you could union the keys P in keyof (M & N). Apr 27 at 17:14
  • Can you give me a TypeScript Playground link to what you mean, @charles-allen?
    – Aidin
    Apr 27 at 19:47
  • 1
    With & N it allows the overriding type to narrow props that weren't already narrowed in the base: typescriptlang.org/play?#code/… Apr 28 at 18:13
  • Got it. Right. Feel free to edit my answer and add this pro-tip. Thanks! :)
    – Aidin
    Apr 30 at 15:39
4

It's funny I spend the day investigating possibility to solve the same case. I found that it not possible doing this way:

// a.ts - module
export interface A {
    x: string | any;
}

// b.ts - module
import {A} from './a';

type SomeOtherType = {
  coolStuff: number
}

interface B extends A {
    x: SomeOtherType;
}

Cause A module may not know about all available types in your application. And it's quite boring port everything from everywhere and doing code like this.

export interface A {
    x: A | B | C | D ... Million Types Later
}

You have to define type later to have autocomplete works well.


So you can cheat a bit:

// a.ts - module
export interface A {
    x: string;
}

Left the some type by default, that allow autocomplete works, when overrides not required.

Then

// b.ts - module
import {A} from './a';

type SomeOtherType = {
  coolStuff: number
}

// @ts-ignore
interface B extends A {
    x: SomeOtherType;
}

Disable stupid exception here using @ts-ignore flag, saying us the we doing something wrong. And funny thing everything works as expected.

In my case I'm reducing the scope vision of type x, its allow me doing code more stricted. For example you have list of 100 properties, and you reduce it to 10, to avoid stupid situations

4

Date: 19/3/2021. I think the latest typescript(4.1.2) version is supporting interface override in d.ts file.

// in test.d.ts

interface A {
  a: string
}

export interface B extends A {
  a: number
}

// in any ts file
import { B } from 'test.d.ts'

// this will work
const test: B = { a: 3 }

// this will not work
const test1: B = { a: "3" }

6
  • Is it 20201 yet? Lol. You're talking to us from the future.Are there flying cars there? Apr 18, 2021 at 7:30
  • Hahaha, I would like to say Yes, cars are flying and people are traveling by jet suit. :-) Thanks for pointing out the typo!!! Apr 19, 2021 at 1:40
  • 3
    I'm from the future. It does not work incorrectly extends interface May 16, 2021 at 3:45
  • What is your ts version? Did you declare the interface in the d.ts file? @victorzadorozhnyy Jun 4, 2021 at 10:35
  • @yongmingzhuang 4.2 I've try to do it in tsx Jun 5, 2021 at 0:05
2

If someone else needs a generic utility type to do this, I came up with the following solution:

/**
 * Returns object T, but with T[K] overridden to type U.
 * @example
 * type MyObject = { a: number, b: string }
 * OverrideProperty<MyObject, "a", string> // returns { a: string, b: string }
 */
export type OverrideProperty<T, K extends keyof T, U> = Omit<T, K> & { [P in keyof Pick<T, K>]: U };

I needed this because in my case, the key to override was a generic itself.

If you don't have Omit ready, see Exclude property from type.

2
  • 1
    This is exactly what I was looking for, I can't thank you enough :D :D :D Jul 31, 2020 at 11:21
  • @dwoodwardgb glad it was useful for someone else :-)
    – Toni
    Aug 21, 2020 at 14:07
1

If you only want to modify the type of an existing property and not remove it, then & is enough:

// Style that accepts both number and percent(string)
type BoxStyle = {
  height?: string | number,
  width?: string | number,
  padding?: string | number,
  borderRadius?: string | number,
}

// These are both valid
const box1: BoxStyle = {height: '20%', width: '20%', padding: 0, borderRadius: 5}
const box2: BoxStyle = {height: 85, width: 85, padding: 0, borderRadius: 5}

// Override height and width to be only numbers
type BoxStyleNumeric = BoxStyle & {
  height?: number,
  width?: number,
}

// This is still valid
const box3: BoxStyleNumeric = {height: 85, width: 85, padding: 0, borderRadius: 5}

// This is not valid anymore
const box4: BoxStyleNumeric = {height: '20%', width: '20%', padding: 0, borderRadius: 5}
0

NOTE: Not sure if the syntax I'm using in this answer was available when the older answers were written, but I think that this is a better approach on how to solve the example mentioned in this question.


I've had some issues related to this topic (overwriting interface properties), and this is how I'm handling it:

  1. First create a generic interface, with the possible types you'd like to use.

You can even use choose a default value for the generic parameter as you can see in <T extends number | SOME_OBJECT = number>

type SOME_OBJECT = { foo: "bar" }

interface INTERFACE_A <T extends number | SOME_OBJECT = number> {
  property: T;
}
  1. Then you can create new types based on that contract, by passing a value to the generic parameter (or omit it and use the default):
type A_NUMBER = INTERFACE_A;                   // USES THE default = number TYPE. SAME AS INTERFACE_A<number>
type A_SOME_OBJECT = INTERFACE_A<SOME_OBJECT>  // MAKES { property: SOME_OBJECT }

And this is the result:

const aNumber: A_NUMBER = {
    property: 111  // THIS EXPECTS A NUMBER
}

const anObject: A_SOME_OBJECT = {
    property: {   // THIS EXPECTS SOME_OBJECT
        foo: "bar"
    }
}

Typescript playground

0

extending Qwerty's Modify utility type solution to restrict keys of R to ones present in T and add IntelliSense as well

export type Modify<T, R extends Partial<Record<keyof T, any>>> = Omit<T, keyof R> & R;

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