0

I have a function where input is either a Dictionary or an array of Dictionaries:

public convert(input: IDictionary<any> | IDictionary<any>[], additionalProps?: string[]) {
  if ( input instanceof Array ) {
    this._handlers.forEach(fn => {
      input = input.map(i => fn(i));
    });
    return input.map(i => this._convert(i, additionalProps));
  } else {
    this._handlers.forEach(fn => {
      input = fn(input);
    });
    return this._convert(input, additionalProps);
  }
}

The function does what I need it to but Typescript is not correctly identifying that the input reference within the if block is always going to be an array so it gives me the following error:

Property 'map' does not exist on type 'IDictionary'

I would have thought with Typescript 2.x it would have used the if block as part of its control flow analysis to determine that the union type could only now be the IDictionary<any>[] type. Is my understanding wrong? Is there a correct way to notate this?


p.s. I'm using Typescript 2.1.4


some additional context on handlers:

export default class Mapper {
  private _handlers: Function[] = [];

and handlers are set with the following public interface:

public handlers(fn: Function | Function[]) {
  if(fn instanceof Array) {
    this._handlers.concat(fn);
  } else {
    this._handlers.push(fn);
  }

  return this;
}

the entire class can be found in this gist. An example usage of the mapper class would be ...

const mapping: IMapping = {
  id: 'invoiceId',
  type: (context) => context['type'] === 'ACCREC' ? 'accounts-receivable' : 'accounts-payable',
  date: (context) => xero.xeroDate(context['date']),
  dueDate: (context) => xero.xeroDate(context['dueDate']),
  lastUpdated: (context) => xero.xeroDate(context['updatedDateUtc']),
  payments: (context) => context['payments'].map((p: IDictionary<any>) => p['PaymentID']),
  prePayments: (context) => context['prepayments'].map((p: IDictionary<any>) => p['PaymentID']),
  overPayments: (context) => context['overpayments'].map((p: IDictionary<any>) => p['PaymentID'])
};

const mapper = new Mapper(mapping);
return mapper
  .handler(utils.camelCaseProperties)  
  .convert(invoices);

Finally, IDictionary is defined as:

interface IDictionary<T> {
  [key: string]: T;
};
  • What's this._handlers? – Nitzan Tomer Dec 22 '16 at 15:33
  • it's a private instance variable which holds an array of handler functions. – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:34
  • Yeah, that I understood, but what do these functions return? – Nitzan Tomer Dec 22 '16 at 15:35
  • I've added some more context to the question ... does that answer your question? – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:38
  • in terms of what these handler functions return ... it's a dictionary or an array of dictionaries. – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:39
0

Use type assertion:

if ( input instanceof Array ) {
    let inputArray = <IDictionary<any>[]> input;
    this._handlers.forEach(fn => {
      inputArray = inputArray.map(i => fn(i));
    });
    // ...
}
  • Does this necessitate the introduction of a new variable or can I assert on the input variable directly? ... guess it does. That explains why my earlier attempt at this failed. – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:40
  • I guess you could also do this: inputArray = <IDictionary<any>[]> inputArray.map(i => fn(i)); but you will have to assert it every time you use the variable. – lenny Dec 22 '16 at 15:44
  • There's no need for type assertion, it's enough to do let inputArray = input – Nitzan Tomer Dec 22 '16 at 15:47
1

The problem is that you are changing the type of input in two different places:

input = input.map(i => fn(i));

And

input = fn(input);

You can do this:

public convert(input: IDictionary<any> | IDictionary<any>[], additionalProps?: string[]) {
    let input2;

    if ( input instanceof Array ) {
        this._handlers.forEach(fn => {
            input2 = input.map(i => fn(i));
        });

        return input2.map(i => this._convert(i, additionalProps));
    } else {
        this._handlers.forEach(fn => {
            input2 = fn(input);
        });

        return this._convert(input2, additionalProps);
    }
}

Or change the type of _handler to be:

private _handlers = [] as Array<() => IDictionary<any>[]>;
  • i like the definition of _handlers approach but can't get it to work. The functions always just transform a single dictionary to another dictionary (I think i misstated that earlier) so I think your above solution should be: private _handlers = [] as Array<() => IDictionary<any>>; (aka, I removed the array of dictionaries in favor of a singular dictionary. – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:53
  • I get the error Type 'Function' provides no match for the signature '(): IDictionary<any>' – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:55
  • in the singular handler block I get this error: (parameter) input: IDictionary<any> | IDictionary<any>[] – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:57
  • These functions, what do they do? You can probably have a better type for that as well.. – Nitzan Tomer Dec 22 '16 at 15:57
  • they convert an 3rd party input dictionary to a normalized dictionary; so a common handler function would be to camelize the property names in the dictionary. Another one be to convert dates to unix epoc format, etc. – ken Dec 22 '16 at 15:58

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