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I was wondering if one of you could confirm that I'm deleting some dynamically allocated memory properly.

The TileWrapper below is initialized as a 2D array of pointers:

private:
    TileWrapper*** mLayout;

I've simplified its initialization to show you the important parts:

void generateLayout() {
    mLayout = new TileWrapper**[mRows];
    for(int i = 0; i < mRows; i++) {
        mLayout[i] = new TileWrapper*[mColumns];
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < mRows; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < mColumns; j++) {
            mLayout[i][j] = new TileWrapper();
        }
    }
}

The part that I need confirmed is the destruction, shown below:

~Destructor() {
    for (int i = 0; i < mRows; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < mColumns; j++) {
            delete mLayout[i][j];
        }
        delete[] mLayout[i];  // CONFIRM THIS
    }
    delete[] mLayout;  // CONFIRM THIS
}

I'm especially concerned about the deletes that have // CONFIRM THIS afterwards due to the [] characters. Is my code memory-leak proof? Thanks.

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    Yes, it seem to be memory-leak proof. You can check it by using memory-check tools like Valgrind or DrMemory – Hugal31 Dec 22 '16 at 18:37
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    std::vector. Check it out. It's two decades old by now. – molbdnilo Dec 22 '16 at 18:39
  • @molbdnilo I'm aware, I didn't want to use it since I don't need any of the functions that come with it. – Anthroyd Dec 22 '16 at 18:40
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    You need to learn about smart pointers. In modern C++ (C++11,14 and newer) manual delete's are pretty much a code smell indicating that you are probably "doing it wrong". – Jesper Juhl Dec 22 '16 at 18:41
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    @AdrianBobrowski - but you do want to use some of the functions that come with std::vector, in particular, the built-in memory management. – Pete Becker Dec 22 '16 at 19:03
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It is safe and sound as far as displayed code concerned. The confusion may arise from way the second for loop that is used. It is actually an equivalent of

for(int i = 0; i < mRows; i++) {
    for(int j = 0; j < mColumns; j++) {
        *(*(mLayout + i) + j) = new TileWrapper();
    }
}

The construction with triple pointer got one disadvantage known even in time of K&R: it isn't guaranteed to occupy monolithic area of memory because you allocate each "column" separately in your code, so it is not a multidimensional array of pointers by memory model, which should declared to users of this "array". In C++ it isn't possible to allocate whole array in one go AND use subscripts for it without creating helper template types or redefining operator[]

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