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I'm reading Anthony William's C++ Concurrency in Action. Chapter 7 describes the process of developing a lock-free stack and illustrates common issues that make lock-free programming difficult. Specifically, section 7.2.3 (Detecting nodes that can't be reclaimed using hazard pointers) describes how hazard pointers can be used to avoid a data race and make sure other threads don't delete a node still referenced by another thread.

This code is one of the iterations of pop() illustrated in that chapter:

std::shared_ptr<T> pop()
{
  std::atomic<void*>& hp = get_hazard_pointer_for_current_thread();
  node* old_head = head.load();

  do
  {
    node* temp;

    do
    {
      temp = old_head;
      hp.store(old_head);
      old_head = head.load();
    } while(old_head != temp);
  }
  while(old_head &&
    !head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head,old_head->next));

  hp.store(nullptr);
  std::shared_ptr<T> res;

  if(old_head)
  {
    res.swap(old_head->data);

    if(outstanding_hazard_pointers_for(old_head))
    {
      reclaim_later(old_head);
    }
    else
    {
      delete old_head;
    }

    delete_nodes_with_no_hazards();
  }

  return res;
}

I have a doubt about this fragment:

    if(outstanding_hazard_pointers_for(old_head))
    {
      reclaim_later(old_head);
    }
    else
    {
      delete old_head;
    }

The purpose of the hazard pointers is making sure old_head is deleted when no other threads may still be using it. The suggested implementation of outstanding_hazard_pointers_for is the following:

unsigned const max_hazard_pointers=100;
struct hazard_pointer
{
  std::atomic<std::thread::id> id;
  std::atomic<void*> pointer;
};
hazard_pointer hazard_pointers[max_hazard_pointers];

bool outstanding_hazard_pointers_for(void* p)
{
  for(unsigned i=0; i < max_hazard_pointers; ++i)
  {
    if(hazard_pointers[i].pointer.load() == p)
    {
      return true;
    }
  }

  return false;
}

Basically, the array of hazard pointers is scanned to check whether the pointer to the node looked for is present. I'm wondering why this operation is indeed safe. An atomic load() is performed and even if sequentially consistent ordering is used, load() may load a stale value. As a consequence, p may not be found, and pop() would be deleting a node that is still in use.

Imagine the following happens:

  • Thread A starts to execute pop() and is preempted just before executing:

    while(old_head &&
      !head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head,old_head->next));
    

    Thread A thus sees the current head as old_head, which is saved into its hazard pointer. old_head will be dereferenced when the thread wakes up and tries to pop the head invoking head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head, old_head->next).

  • Thread B starts invoking pop() down to

    if(outstanding_hazard_pointers_for(old_head))
    

    old_head will be the current head of the stack, that is the same node that thread A is referencing as old_head. Thread B will not delete old_head iff a load() on Thread A's hazard pointer returns the latest value stored by Thread A.

Basically: I'm wondering whether Thread B can load() a stale value instead of the latest one. Said another way, I'm not sure why it has to return the value set by Thread A's (old_node).

Where's the flaw in this reasoning? I cannot find a justification as to why hp.store(old_head) on another thread will happen-before hazard_pointers[i].pointer.load().

  • I am reading the book and have the exact same question as you. I currently do not understand how the answer below answers your concern. Since you had the same understanding problem, could you rephrase the reason why the scenario you describe cannot happen and we have a "happen before" between the hazard ptr list scan and the store before the CAS? – JJ15k May 16 '17 at 14:41
  • JJ15k, I just answered your question. – Enrico M. Crisostomo May 25 '17 at 12:32
1

I'm answering my own question for two reasons: I think the answer I accepted is not very clear, and JJ15k's comment confirms that impression.

Basically the key is observing that for another thread to make it through if(outstanding_hazard_pointers_for(old_head)) and seeing the same old_head seen by another thread that was preempted before executing while(old_head && !head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head, old_head->next)), it has to have executed head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head, old_head->next) with the same old_head. But then (assuming < indicates a happens-before relationship):

thread A: hp.store(old_head)     < 
thread A: old_head = head.load() < 
thread B: head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head, old_head->next)

Remember that thread B is seeing the same old_head we loaded in the first instruction and it's swapping it's value to old_head->next. We still see the same value in head.load(), that's why it Thread A hp.store(old_head) happens-before the Thread B compare_exchange_strong.

So the thread that is about to check whether the head contained in the hazard pointer can be deleted has to see old_head. Also notice the fundamental role played by old_head = head.load() (and the loop that contains those statements that may seem redundant at first sight). Without that load operation, there would be no happens-before relationship between the store of old_head into hp and the compare_exchange_strong.

I hope this answers your question.

  • First thanks for taking the time! I am trying to think about it but :What forces the second happen before relationship though? I see no release write from A being read in B. I think I can kind of understand it at the cache coherency level since the XCH will invalidate all copies but I still can't convince myself using the C++ memory model. – JJ15k May 27 '17 at 20:38
  • You shouldn't look for acquire-release semantics in that code: all atomic operations are using the sequentially consistent memory order. – Enrico M. Crisostomo May 28 '17 at 22:07
  • Yes that's what I am exploring , reasoning related to the global total order on the memory location. I have been very busy and haven't given it the thought it requires. Will do that in the next few days – JJ15k May 29 '17 at 9:41
  • Got it, my confusion stemmed from not realising one fact : In the sequentially consistent model, for every two operation A and B, either A happens before B , or B happens before A. This is in contrast to release/acquire where the condition is either B acquire happens after release A , or you just don't know. Again many thanks for your help. – JJ15k May 30 '17 at 21:00
0

My understanding of the code is the following.

If hp.store(old_head) in another thread NOT happen-before the call hazard_pointers[i].pointer.load() in this thread, it means that this thread successfully performed head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head,old_head->next) call. It means that for another thread old_head != temp, so it will perform another attempt to store a proper old_head as a thread's hp.

And it means that the original old_head pointer in the current thread can be safely deleted, since it's not actually used by another thread.

  • Thanks @art. I've updated the question with an example. Basically, a thread could be preempted after having checked that old_head == temp. Another thread could proceed until checking whether the node could be deleted. In that case it is critical that the first thread's store() be visible in the second thread's load(). I'm wrongly assuming that sequentially consistent loads can read stale values if they do not violate the sequential consistency? – Enrico M. Crisostomo Dec 23 '16 at 18:38
  • You significantly modified your original question. Your understanding about reading stale values is correct. But there is no problem in the scenario you described in the modified question neither. Thread B will add old_head into reclaim_later list. So that the thread A (or any other thread later) will be able to delete this unused node during delete_nodes_with_no_hazards call. – art Dec 23 '16 at 20:22
  • Sorry if I reiterate, but that's the core of the question: thread B will add old_head into the reclaim list iff outstanding_hazard_pointers_for returns true. When I say "reading a stale value", I mean outstanding_hazard_pointers_for not finding old_head into the hazard pointers array (e.g.: because the effect of the store() aren't visible yet), in which case outstanding_hazard_pointers_for would return false and pop() would delete the node. – Enrico M. Crisostomo Dec 23 '16 at 21:20
  • The thread's hp modified before while(old_head && !head.compare_exchange_strong(old_head,old_head->next)); condition. So if you observe in thread B new head value from the thread A, you observer also the correct value of A's hp. You cannot see the stale version of A's hp and the recent version of head modified in A. – art Dec 23 '16 at 23:51

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