2

This Question is intended as a canonical Question/Answer for disambiguation as to the descriptive term "recursion", or "recursive". And to the extent applicable, "a non-terminating procedure that happens to refer to itself" and "repeated scheduling".


In JavaScript what are the definitions of and differences between

  1. "recursion";
  2. "a non-terminating procedure that happens to refer to itself"; and
  3. "repeated scheduling"

I often see the term "recursion" used when a function repeated calls itself, though what is the unambiguous definition of "recursion" in JavaScript?

Rarely have I viewed the terms "a non-terminating procedure that happens to refer to itself" or "repeated scheduling" used when describing the pattern of a function; frequently "recursive" or "recursion" is used to describe a pattern where within the body of the function call, a function call is made to the original function which began the process.

When is "recursion" not applicable to a particular function pattern; and what are the unambiguous definitions and distinctions between "recursion", "a non-terminating procedure that happens to refer to itself" and "repeated scheduling"?

  • 1
    Why do you think its definition would be different in JavaScript? – Bergi Jan 28 '18 at 22:49
2

Recursion

I often see the term "recursion" used when a function repeated calls itself, though what is the unambiguous definition of "recursion" in JavaScript?

That definition seems fine, but the function doesn't have to call itself directly to be recursive, it's execution just has to lead to it being called again. An example of recursion where the function doesn't directly call itself is: Calling A(); calls B(); which calls C(); which calls A(); again.

Repeated Scheduling

A function like this uses repeated scheduling:

function A ( foo ) {
  var bar;
  setTimeout( A, 0 );
  console.log( 'hello' );
}

It is not recursive because A isn't called repeatedly on the same call stack. When the current call stack is done (which means 'hello' will have been logged) and nothing else is ahead of calling A again in the event loop, A will be called. Aside from the difference between synchronous and asynchronous code, the important different here is that there is only ever one copy of foo and bar at a time, and the call stack isn't growing, hence there will be no memory or Maximum call stack size exceeded errors, which there would be for this version which uses recursion:

function A ( foo ) {
  var bar;
  A();
  console.log( 'hello' );
}

In that case 'hello' will never be printed since A calls itself before it gets to the logging statement.

A Non-Terminating Procedure that Refers to Itself

A non-terminating procedure is just an infinite loop. Referring to itself is somewhat meaningless:

function A ( ) {
    // Never terminates
    while ( true ) {
        // If A() is called here, or before
        // the loop you have infinite 
        // recursion and a stack size error
    }
    // If, instead, A() is called here,
    // you just have an infinite-loop,
    // since this statement is never reached
}
  • How is the third example different from first example, where stack size error is avoided, for example using break at some point within while statement, and A() is called following while loop? Is asynchronous calling of original function at some point in future still recursion? Or, is there a different evaluation when the function call includes asynchronous function calls before the original function is called again? – guest271314 Dec 22 '16 at 23:39
  • The third example isn't different from recursion if a break is added and A(); is called after the loop. A stack size error would occur. – Paul Dec 22 '16 at 23:44
  • 1
    @guest271314 That would be repeated scheduling, because then calls the function asynchronously. The only thing synchronous in doAsynchronousStuff is the return statement, which calls the Promise constructor, which calls the function passed into it, which calls setTimeout. Everything else is asynchronous. – Paul Dec 22 '16 at 23:52
  • 1
    @guest271314 It just depends on whether the function returns before it is called again. isEven can call itself before it returns (EG. isEven(2) calls isEven(0) before returning), so it is recursive. doAsynchronousStuff returns a Promise immediately, so it has already returned and is not on the call stack anymore when it is called again asynchronously. – Paul Dec 23 '16 at 0:16
  • 1
    "The measure of whether a function is recursive or not depends directly on the whether the function is placed within the call stack by the function itself?" Yes. "Not whether the function returns an asynchronous result?" Correct. "Or, are all asynchronous functions not placed onto the call stack? Or are asynchronous functions called then removed from the call stack?" They are not placed on the existing call stack, but they will be the start of a new call stack at some point later, after the current call stack finished and they are next in the event loop's queue. – Paul Dec 23 '16 at 0:27

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.