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I just finished working on a singly list copy constructor, and I'm now headed to making a doubly list copy constructor. Can anyone tell me how different it is from a singly list constructor, cause I'm conflicted between starting afresh for my doubly linked list copy constructor or copying my singly list copy constructor. How should I go about this?

If it helps, here is my copy constructor from my singly linked list:

        List(const List &copying) : head(NULL)
        {
            Node* cur = copying.head;
            int size = copying.size();
            Node* end = NULL;
            for(int q = 0; q < size; q++)
            {
                Node* n = new Node;
                n->value = cur->value;
                if (head == NULL)
                {
                    head = n;
                    end = head;
                }
                else
                {
                    end->next = n;
                    end = n;
                }
                cur = cur->next;
            }
            end->next = NULL;
        }

Any and all input is welcome. Thanks everyone :-)

  • Your singly linked list copy constructor will blow up if you are copying from an empty list. First rule of linked-lists: Never have special cases. Node** target = &head; for (Node* cur = copying.head; cur; cur=cur-next) { Node* n = new Node(cur->value); *target = n; target = &(n->next); } *target = nullptr; – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 23 '16 at 10:06
  • What exactly would "blow up" mean @MartinBonner? I'm actually new to programming in c++. – BusyProgrammer Dec 23 '16 at 12:29
  • @PeterG That link was not about copy constructors. I had checked it, but it didn't answer my query regarding copy constructors for doubly linked lists. – BusyProgrammer Dec 23 '16 at 12:32
  • Sorry. Didn't notice your comment here before replying below. When the list is empty, you never set end to anything other than NULL, and then you write to end->next - which will (with luck) cause an access violation. (If it doesn't, you are probably running on an embedded device, and have just splatted the interrupt vector somewhere.) – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 23 '16 at 12:41
  • I see, @MartinBonner. I missed that glitch in my code :(. Thanks for clarifying it though! – BusyProgrammer Dec 23 '16 at 12:44
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I think you just have to store the previous node (prv). Assuming Your Node has prv as data member.

List(const List &copying) : head(NULL)
{
    Node* cur = copying.head;
    int size = copying.size();
    Node* end = NULL;
    Node* prv = NULL:
    for(int q = 0; q < size; q++)
    {
        Node* n = new Node;
        n->value = cur->value;
        if (head == NULL)
        {
            head = n;
            end = head;
        }
        else
        {
            end->next = n;
            end = n;
        }
        n->prv=prv;
        prv=n;
        cur = cur->next;
    }
    end->next = NULL;
}
  • Well you've reproduced the bug - try copying a zero length list! – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 23 '16 at 10:08
  • @MartinBonner isn't that what the if (head == NULL) { head = n; end = head; } would accomplish? – BusyProgrammer Dec 23 '16 at 12:36
  • 1
    @NewbietoProgramming: No. If size is zero, the for loop is never executed, and we have end = NULL; {} end->next = NULL; It's the final write through end that kills us in the empty loop case. (You can fix this with a test if end is NULL, but a better fix is shown in my comment to the question.) – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 23 '16 at 12:39
  • @user1438832 Wow, only 4 extra lines of code did the job! I was expecting it to be more than that! – BusyProgrammer Dec 23 '16 at 12:46

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