42

I use std::vector<int> for two different kinds of information. I want to be sure that I don't accidentally mix the two uses.

In short, I want something like this piece of code to fail:

#include <vector>

using A = std::vector<int>;
using B = std::vector<int>;

void fa(const A&);
void fb(const B&);

void fun()
{
    A ax;
    B bx;

    fa(bx);
    fb(ax);
}

This code compiles, even though fa expects an argument of type A. Obviously, A and B are identical.

What is the simplest way to make this code compile correctly:

fa(ax);
fb(bx);

and make this code fail:

fa(bx);
fb(ax);

Of course, I can wrap std::vector<int> within another class, but then I'll need to rewrite its interface. Alternatively, I could inherit from std::vector<int>, but this is frequently discouraged.

In short, I need two incompatible versions of std::vector<int>.

EDIT

It has been suggested that Strong typedefs can solve this problem. This is only partially true. If I use BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(std::vector<int>, A), I need to add some annoying casts. For example, instead of

A ax{1,3,5};

I need to use

A ax{std::vector<int>{1,3,5}};

And instead of

for (auto x : ax) ...

I need to use

for (auto x : (std::vector<int>)ax) ...
10
  • Instead of wrapping the entire std::vector<int> in another class, what about wrapping int into something more meaningful? Dec 23 '16 at 11:14
  • 9
    Possible duplicate of Strong typedefs Dec 23 '16 at 11:21
  • 2
    Can you give us some context? Usually I would answer such things specific to what A and B are supposed to be. That said, a regular usage of std::vector will create vectors that should not be inserted in some other parts of the function, this is pretty obvious, right? Like a vector that defines an order which should not be inserted in a sorting algorithm. So, I don't really see why you need them to be incompatible. Of course, you will have some reasons for that, and I'd really like to hear them. They might be the key to your question.
    – Aziuth
    Dec 23 '16 at 11:33
  • 1
    @Aziuth, the vectors are used to hold two different representations of a position in a game. One representation is useful for some calculations, another representations is useful for other calculations. I want to ensure that a function that expects representation A isn't called with representation B.
    – oz1cz
    Dec 23 '16 at 12:08
  • 3
    "Alternatively, I could inherit from std::vector<int>, but this is frequently discouraged." Pfft, nothing wrong with it here. You're not planning to dynamically allocate your type, or to add data members to it, are you? No. So just publicly inherit from std::vector<int> to create your own types and be done with it. Dec 23 '16 at 12:23
63

I think what you want is still best achieved with:

struct A : public std::vector<int>{
  using vector::vector;
};
struct B : public std::vector<int>{
  using vector::vector;
};

It does exactly what you want. There's no reason to come up with some ugly hackery just to avoid a clean statement. The main reason I see that such subtyping is not favored is that the same things should behave like they are the same and can be used interchangeably. But that is exactly what you want to suppress, and therefore subtyping it makes exactly the statement that you want: they have the same interface but they shouldn't be used the same because they aren't the same.

16
  • 3
    @Aziuth: no. Type X is a descendant of type Y iff X is_a Y. Two types are equal iff any of them is_an other. OP clearly stated that A and B are distinct: A is_not_a B (even if you can specify their state with the same parameters, their schematics differ).
    – lorro
    Dec 23 '16 at 11:43
  • 6
    @Aziuth: vector is not polymorphic, so whatever derived class cannot act as a vector substitute, since vector method will not be redirected to the inherited class. So any OOP-related mantra (derive = is_a, don't derive if it's not virtual etc. etc.), must not apply here, because we are not in a pure OOP context (we are in a generic programming arena, here). The fact both A and B decay into vector only means that functions taking a vector can work with A and B also (but is probably what he needs). But functions requiring A will not work with either B or vector. Dec 23 '16 at 12:17
  • 17
    @Aziuth: We understand what you're saying. We're saying that you're wrong. A does add functionality to vector: the functionality of being an A. That's it. Problem solved. No more work to do. Dec 23 '16 at 12:24
  • 13
    @Aziuth IMHO that's exactly the sort of thing we should be doing in programming. Making best use of the type checker is a really good thing and lets us spot many errors that would otherwise go unnoticed.
    – Muzer
    Dec 23 '16 at 13:29
  • 11
    @Aziuth It's actually very common to do just that in languages with stronger type systems (OCaml comes to mind). There is no reason that I can pass an integer specifying a temperature to a function that expects an integer signifying time in minutes - it's just an unimportant implementation detail that they're both represented by the same primitive data type, but their meaning is different and they shouldn't be interchangeable.
    – Voo
    Dec 23 '16 at 14:21
16

One way or another, this is a case of primitive obsession. Either the ints really represent something and the vectors are a collection of that something, or the vector<int>s represent something.

In both cases, this should be solved by wrapping the primitive up into something more meaningful. For example:

class column
{
  int id;
  /*...*/
}; 
class row
{
  int id;
  /*...*/
};

std::vector<row> and std::vector<column> would not be interchangeable.

Of course, the same idea could be applied to vector<int> instead of int, if vector<int> is the primitive that really means something else.

7
  • 2
    Subtyping the basic integral type with a lot of code to avoid subtyping the vector itself just moves the problem. If that is acceptable why wouldn't it be acceptable to subtype the vector? Dec 23 '16 at 11:50
  • 2
    @Christoph Because it's the integers that, likely, represent different things. They just happen to be stored in a vector. That kind of primitive obsession should be fixed. Dec 23 '16 at 11:58
  • 3
    I like the first part of this, but not the second part. Just use a template: template<class T> class tagged_integer { /* ... */ }; using row=tagged_integer<struct row_tag>;
    – T.C.
    Dec 23 '16 at 12:06
  • 1
    What you call 'primitive obsession' was actually a very good solution we came up with for a design problem where multiple libraries - released separately and being unrelated - had to talk to each other. Specifying the interface in terms of std::function<> and base types that 'just fit' gave us null-mediators for interconnect instead of O(n^2) mediators or base-of-base libraries to depend on. Also, it allowed client to mix-and-match versions of the libs.
    – lorro
    Dec 23 '16 at 12:48
  • 2
    @lorro: API boundaries are a special case... but they are JUST boundaries. Anything that cuts a boundary should be (1) validated and (2) transformed into a domain appropriate type... ideally, in one step as validation is about establishing invariants. Dec 23 '16 at 18:56
4

Alternatively, I could inherit from std::vector, but this is frequently discouraged.

IMO, it depends on the situation. In general could be a good solution

#include <vector>

class VectorA :
    public std::vector<int> {
 public:
  VectorA() = default;
  ~VectorA() = default;
  VectorA(const VectorA&) = default;
  VectorA(VectorA&&) = default;
  VectorA& operator=(const VectorA&) = default;
  VectorA& operator=(VectorA&&) = default;
};

class VectorB :
    public std::vector<int> {
 public:
  VectorB() = default;
  ~VectorB() = default;
  VectorB(const VectorB&) = default;
  VectorB(VectorB&&) = default;
  VectorB& operator=(const VectorB&) = default;
  VectorB& operator=(VectorB&&) = default;
};

You can still use VectorA and VectorB as normal vector, but you cannot switch among them.

void acceptA(const VectorA& v) {
  // do something
}

void acceptB(const VectorB& v) {
  // do something
}

template<typename T>
void acceptVector(const std::vector<T>& v) {
  // do something
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  VectorA va;
  VectorB vb;

  acceptA(va);  // you can only pass VectorA
  acceptB(vb);  // same here for VectorB

  acceptVector(va);  // any vector
  acceptVector(vb);

  return 0;
}
1
  • 15
    What's the purpose of declaring everything as default? Just let it go! Dec 23 '16 at 12:22
4

This is partly why you can do object oriented programming in C++ as well as object based programming reusing the library types.

Make A and B classes which model the behaviour in your domain. It doesn't matter if it happens that both behaviours are implemented with fields which are vectors of ints; as long as you do no not break encapsulation, all the operations on the distinct vectors will be in the scope of their class and no confusion can occur.

#include <vector>

class A {
    std::vector<int> cake_orders_;

public:
    void f() ; // can only do something to do with cake
};

class B {
    std::vector<int> meal_worm_lengths_;

public:
    void f() ; // can only do something to do with worms
};


void fun()
{
    A ax;
    B bx;

    a.f(); // has to be the right thing
    b.f();
}

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