-5

I am new to programming, and am currently in product management. So I am learning the ropes. I tried this statement:

public class Tuna { 
    Formatter f;
    public void createfile(){
    try{            
        f = new Formatter("help.text"); 
        f.format("%s%s", "firstname ","lastname");
    }

    catch (Exception e){
        System.out.println("You got an error ");
    }
}

Now the first statement executes and a file is created, but the second statement does not execute by creating an entry into the file.

At the same time when I created a method called createrecord() and inserted the f.format(..); statement it worked.

Can anyone tell me how all of this works?

  • 3
    You sure can have multiple statements in a try block. Doesn't format return a string rather actually doing something to its environment? – John Dvorak Dec 23 '16 at 16:11
  • You can certainly have multiple lines in a try block or any other kind of block, for that matter. – duffymo Dec 23 '16 at 16:12
0

First, you should never catch Exception. Instead, be as specific as possible in watch exception type to catch. In this case it would be FileNotFoundException.

Secondly, you have to close your formatter so it will actually release the file and make the edits.

Example that works for me:

public class SO41304560 {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        try {
            Formatter formatter = new Formatter("c:/Temp/test.txt");
            formatter.format("%s%s", "firstname ","lastname");
            formatter.close();
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            throw new Exception(e);
        }
    }
}

As Formatter is AutoClosable, you can also use a try with resources:

public class SO41304560 {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        try (Formatter formatter = new Formatter("c:/Temp/test.txt")){
            formatter.format("%s%s", "firstname ","lastname");
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            throw new Exception(e);
        }
    }
}
-1

Yes, you can put as much code as your heart desires in a try block (but there's something to be said about how much and what you SHOULD).

First order of business, and this should always be the first thing you check. Is your filename right? Does it have a prefix of .text or .txt?

Also don't forget to flush your formatter once you're done. Call f.flush(); when you're done with it

  • Hi...yes it is help.txt and not help.text....sorry. – Raju Dec 23 '16 at 16:24
-1

Yes, there is no limit on the quantity of the code to put inside a try block, it depends on how much you need to control the execution of the code based on the exceptions.

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