16

The new standard expected for 2017 adds std::filesystem. Using it, how can I count the number of files (including sub-directories) in a directory?

I know we can do:

std::size_t number_of_files_in_directory(std::filesystem::path path)
{
    std::size_t number_of_files = 0u;
    for (auto const & file : std::filesystem::directory_iterator(path))
    {
        ++number_of_files;
    }
    return number_of_files;
}

But that seems overkill. Does a simpler and faster way exist?

3 Answers 3

31

I do not think that a way to easily get amount of files in directory exist, but you can simplify your code by using std::distance instead of handwritten loop:

std::size_t number_of_files_in_directory(std::filesystem::path path)
{
    using std::filesystem::directory_iterator;
    return std::distance(directory_iterator(path), directory_iterator{});
}

You can get number of only actual files or apply any other filter by using count_if instead:

std::size_t number_of_files_in_directory(std::filesystem::path path)
{
    using std::filesystem::directory_iterator;
    using fp = bool (*)( const std::filesystem::path&);
    return std::count_if(directory_iterator(path), directory_iterator{}, (fp)std::filesystem::is_regular_file);
}
4
  • It looks like the difference_type for directory_iterator is std::ptrdiff_t so you will have to cast the first one if you want a size_t.
    – clcto
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 16:54
  • 3
    These can be shortened still: return std::distance(directory_iterator(path), {}); and return std::count_if(directory_iterator(path), {}, std::filesystem::is_regular_file);
    – ildjarn
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 18:06
  • 2
    Have you tested the count_if version? It won't compile. is_regular_file has three overloads.
    – T.C.
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 23:13
  • 2
    return filesystem::remove_all(path) technically meets the requirements.
    – EricWF
    Commented Dec 24, 2016 at 16:31
9
std::size_t number_of_files_in_directory(std::filesystem::path path)
{
    return (std::size_t)std::distance(std::filesystem::directory_iterator{path}, std::filesystem::directory_iterator{});
}

There is no function to find out how many files are in a directory, only functions to iterate over it. The OS only has functions like readdir(), ftw(), FindFirstFileW() so the standard cannot offer a better way.

(On the plus side that allows you to decide whether to, or how deep into, recurse into subdirectories)

7
  • 1
    @Boiethios yes it does: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/experimental/fs/directory_iterator Also that is how the range based for works, so if your code works, then it must.
    – clcto
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 16:55
  • Is std::ptrdiff_t guaranteed to be implicitly convertible to std::size_t?
    – clcto
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 17:00
  • 1
    @clcto Hum, std::ptrdiff_t is signed; but a negative number of files makes little sense.
    – Boiethios
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 17:03
  • @Boiethios sure, but distance returns the distance_type which is std::ptrdiff_t for directory_iterator.
    – clcto
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 17:05
  • @clcto That's better to use an explicit cast IMO. Maybe you could edit the answer.
    – Boiethios
    Commented Dec 23, 2016 at 17:07
0

If you are using Visual Studio 17 you need to use the following namespace.

namespace fs = std::experimental::filesystem;

Then you could probably use a function like this one.

int Count() {
int count=0;
for (auto& p : fs::directory_iterator(dir)) {
    count++;

}
    return count;
}

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