50

I'd like a function, is_just_started, which behaves like the following:

>>> def gen(): yield 0; yield 1
>>> a = gen()
>>> is_just_started(a) 
True
>>> next(a)
0
>>> is_just_started(a) 
False
>>> next(a)
1
>>> is_just_started(a) 
False
>>> next(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
>>> is_just_started(a)
False

How can I implement this function?

I looked at the .gi_running attribute but it appears to be used for something else.

If I know the first value that needs to be sent into the generator, I can do something like this:

def safe_send(gen, a):
    try:
        return gen.send(a)
    except TypeError as e:
        if "just-started" in e.args[0]:
            gen.send(None)
            return gen.send(a)
        else:
            raise

However, this seems abhorrent.

3
69

This only works in Python 3.2+:

>>> def gen(): yield 0; yield 1
... 
>>> a = gen()
>>> import inspect
>>> inspect.getgeneratorstate(a)
'GEN_CREATED'
>>> next(a)
0
>>> inspect.getgeneratorstate(a)
'GEN_SUSPENDED'
>>> next(a)
1
>>> inspect.getgeneratorstate(a)
'GEN_SUSPENDED'
>>> next(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
>>> inspect.getgeneratorstate(a)
'GEN_CLOSED'

So, the requested function is:

import inspect

def is_just_started(gen):
    return inspect.getgeneratorstate(gen) == inspect.GEN_CREATED:

Out of curiosity, I looked into CPython to figure out how it was determining this... Apparently it looks at generator.gi_frame.f_lasti which is the "index of last attempted instruction in bytecode". If it's -1 then it hasn't started yet.

Here's a py2 version:

def is_just_started(gen):
    return gen.gi_frame is not None and gen.gi_frame.f_lasti == -1
7
  • 13
    This is why I love stackoverflow. Even better, it looks like this is well-defined. – Claudiu Dec 23 '16 at 20:02
  • What is GEN_RUNNING good for? the doc says"if it is currently being executed by the interpreter", but I thought that's nonsensical because of GIL? – cat Dec 23 '16 at 23:09
  • 1
    @cat Phrasing is a bit weird. The generator could be running but blocked by IO (e.g. this gist). I suspect it will also happen if the generator is in the middle of execution but deferred by the scheduler. – Ben Kurtovic Dec 23 '16 at 23:59
  • 1
    @cat: Maybe you're in the generator. It'll also be the state of generators running in other threads, whether or not those threads are blocked by the GIL. – user2357112 supports Monica Dec 24 '16 at 0:24
  • 3
    @cat: def g(): yield inspect.getgeneratorstate(x) x = g(); next(x) – deltab Dec 24 '16 at 0:41
26

Make a new generator which simply yields from your generator of interest. It sets a flag once the first value has been consumed. Afterwards, it can simply use yield from for the rest of the items.

Use the substitute generator as a drop in replacement for the generator you're interested in monitoring the "is_just_started" state.

This technique is non-intrusive, and can be used even on generators for which you have no control over the source code.

1
  • 3
    This technique has the advantage that it will work on all Python versions - including Pypy for instance. – Tony Suffolk 66 Dec 27 '16 at 10:29
5

You may create a iterator and set the flag as the instance property to iterator class as:

class gen(object):
    def __init__(self, n):
        self.n = n
        self.num, self.nums = 0, []
        self.is_just_started = True  # Your flag

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    # Python 3 compatibility
    def __next__(self):
        return self.next()

    def next(self):
        self.is_just_started = False  # Reset flag with next
        if self.num < self.n:
            cur, self.num = self.num, self.num+1
            return cur
        else:
            raise StopIteration()

And your value check function would be like:

def is_just_started(my_generator):
    return my_generator.is_just_started

Sample run:

>>> a = gen(2)

>>> is_just_started(a)
True

>>> next(a)
0
>>> is_just_started(a)
False

>>> next(a)
1
>>> is_just_started(a)
False

>>> next(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 19, in next
StopIteration

To know the difference between iterator and generator, check Difference between Python's Generators and Iterators

2
  • That's not a generator. – wim Dec 23 '16 at 22:12
  • @wim: Indeed True. Sorry for my terminology class based generator, correct word should have been iterator. Updated answer. – Anonymous Dec 23 '16 at 22:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.