14

I'm having trouble understanding function signatures and pointers.

struct myStruct
{
    static void staticFunc(){};
    void nonstaticFunc(){};
};

int main()
{
    void (*p)();     // Pointer to function with signature void();
    p = &myStruct::staticFunc;    // Works fine
    p = &myStruct::nonstaticFunc; // Type mismatch   
}

My compiler says that the type of myStruct::nonstaticFunc() is void (myStruct::*)(), but isn't that the type of a pointer pointing to it?

I'm asking because when you create an std::function object you pass the function signature of the function you want it to point to, like:

std::function<void()> funcPtr;      // Pointer to function with signature void()
not 
std::function<void(*)()> funcPtr;

If I had to guess based on the pattern of void() I would say:

void myStruct::();
or
void (myStruct::)();

But this isn't right. I don't see why I should add an asterisk just because it's nonstatic as opposed to static. In other words, pointer void(* )() points to function with signature void(), and pointer void(myStruct::*)() points to function with signature what?

11
  • 1
    You cannot hold a member function in std::function without binding it to a class object. Pointers to members are not like regular function pointers. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 26 '16 at 6:38
  • 1
    You can't assign member function to std::function directly, you need to bind it – Danh Dec 26 '16 at 6:38
  • I know how to point to nonstatic member functions, I'd just declare void(myStruct::*)(); but I'm wondering what is the signature of it, given that the signature of the function pointed to by void(*)() is void() – Zebrafish Dec 26 '16 at 6:51
  • @TitoneMaurice - If you just want to store a member function for later use, see my edit. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 26 '16 at 7:37
  • C++ doesn't have any particular signature format. The signature of a member function is defined in 1.3.20 as <class member function> name, parameter type list (8.3.5), class of which the function is a member, cvqualifiers (if any), and ref-qualifier (if any). Note the signature includes the name. – n. 1.8e9-where's-my-share m. Dec 26 '16 at 8:28
12

To me there seems to be a basic misunderstanding of what a member pointer is. For example if you have:

struct P2d {
    double x, y;
};

the member pointer double P2d::*mp = &P2d::x; cannot point to the x coordinate of a specific P2d instance, it is instead a "pointer" to the name x: to get the double you will need to provide the P2d instance you're looking for... for example:

P2d p{10, 20};

printf("%.18g\n", p.*mp); // prints 10

The same applies to member functions... for example:

struct P2d {
    double x, y;
    double len() const {
        return sqrt(x*x + y*y);
    }
};

double (P2d::*f)() const = &P2d::len;

where f is not a pointer to a member function of a specific instance and it needs a this to be called with

printf("%.18g\n", (p.*f)());

f in other words is simply a "selector" of which of the const member functions of class P2d accepting no parameters and returning a double you are interested in. In this specific case (since there is only one member function compatible) such a selector could be stored using zero bits (the only possible value you can set that pointer to is &P2d::len).

Please don't feel ashamed for not understanding member pointers at first. They're indeed sort of "strange" and not many C++ programmers understand them.

To be honest they're also not really that useful: what is needed most often is instead a pointer to a method of a specific instance.

C++11 provides that with std::function wrapper and lambdas:

std::function<double()> g = [&](){ return p.len(); };

printf("%.18g\n", g()); // calls .len() on instance p
2
  • From what I understand a nonstatic member function is different from a member variable. obj1.intMemb will have a different address than obj2.intMemb, but obj1.membFunc will have same address for all objects, even virtual I think. It's like a ordinary static function with a this pointer, and the language forces you to call it through an object so it's guaranteed to get the address of the 'this' object. It probably doesn't allow you to assign it to a void*p because you can't call it like p(); but I don't see why you couldn't call it like... – Zebrafish Dec 26 '16 at 15:10
  • @TitoneMaurice: non-static member pointers are not memory addresses; in the example the data member pointer could be a single bit (0=x, 1=y) and in the function member pointer doesn't require any storage (because there's only one compatible member function to point to). Static member pointers (both to data and to code) are instead regular pointers. Note however that in C and C++ function code doesn't really have a "memory address"; the philosophical model keeps code and data logically separated: for example you cannot store a function pointer in a void * or vice versa. Memory is for data. – 6502 Dec 26 '16 at 16:10
5
std::function<void()> funcPtr = std::bind(&myStruct::nonstaticFunc, obj);

Is how you store a member function in std::function. The member function must be called on a valid object.


If you want to delay the passing of an object until later, you can accomplish it like this:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

struct A {

    void foo() { std::cout << "A::foo\n"; }
};

int main() {
    using namespace std::placeholders;

    std::function<void(A&)> f = std::bind(&A::foo, _1);

    A a;
    f(a);

    return 0;
}

std::bind will take care of the details for you. std::function still must have the signature of a regular function as it's type parameter. But it can mask a member, if the object is made to appear as a parameter to the function.


Addenum:
For assigning into std::function, you don't even need std::bind for late binding of the object, so long as the prototype is correct:

std::function<void(A&)> f = &A::foo;
2
  • 5
    std::function<void(A&)> f = &A::foo; should work just as well, without bind. It already treats &A::foo as "something that can be called if passed an A". – user743382 Dec 26 '16 at 12:28
  • @hvd - Figure I should just add it in. Thanks. I keep forgetting bind's uses are fewer and far between with every new standard version. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 26 '16 at 12:39
1
p = &myStruct::staticFunc;    // Works fine
p = &myStruct::nonstaticFunc; // Type mismatch

Reason : A function-to-pointer conversion never applies to non-static member functions because an lvalue that refers to a non-static member function cannot be obtained.


pointer void(* )() points to function with signature void(), and pointer void(myStruct::*)() points to function with signature what?

myStruct:: is to make sure that the non-static member function of struct myStruct is called (not of other structs, as shown below) :

struct myStruct
{
    static void staticFunc(){};
    void nonstaticFunc(){};
};
struct myStruct2
{
    static void staticFunc(){};
    void nonstaticFunc(){};
};

int main()
{
    void (*p)();     // Pointer to function with signature void();
    void (myStruct::*f)();
    p = &myStruct::staticFunc;    // Works fine
    p = &myStruct2::staticFunc;   // Works fine
    f = &myStruct::nonstaticFunc; // Works fine
    //f =  &myStruct2::nonstaticFunc;  // Error. Cannot convert 'void (myStruct2::*)()' to 'void (myStruct::*)()' in assignment

    return 0;
}
0

When you use a pointer, std::function or std::bind to refer to a non-static member function (namely, "method" of class Foo), the first param must be a concrete object of class Foo, because non-static method must be called by a concrete object, not by Class.

More details: std::function and std::bind.

0

The answer is in the doc.

Pointer to member declarator: the declaration S C::* D; declares D as a pointer to non-static member of C of type determined by decl-specifier-seq S.

struct C
{
    void f(int n) { std::cout << n << '\n'; }
};

int main()
{
    void (C::* p)(int) = &C::f; // pointer to member function f of class C
    C c;
    (c.*p)(1);                  // prints 1
    C* cp = &c;
    (cp->*p)(2);                // prints 2
}

There are no function with signature void (). There are void (*)() for a function or void (foo::*)() for a method of foo. The asterisk is mandatory because it's a pointer to x. std::function has nothing to do with that.

Note: Your confusion is that void() is that same signature that void (*)(). Or even int() <=> int (*)(). Maybe you think that you can write int (foo::*) to have a method pointer. But this is a data member pointer because the parenthesis are optional, int (foo::*) <=> int foo::*.

To avoid such obscure syntax you need to write your pointer to function/member with the return type, the asterisk and his parameters.

2
  • Right, so what's the signature? A pointer void()() points to function signature void(), and pointer void(myStruct::)() points to function signature what? – Zebrafish Dec 26 '16 at 6:55
  • I thought the signature for such a function was void(), which is why you can declare: void aFuncTakingAFunc(void()); – Zebrafish Dec 26 '16 at 7:04

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