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I have a data dictionary with eeg, gyroscope and other data. For processing, I want to extract eeg and gyroscope data in seperate dicts. Therefore I have two lists with the keys of eeg and gyroscope. I made it work with two dict comprehensions, but maybe there is a smoother solution to this.

eegKeys = ["FP3", "FP4"]
gyroKeys = ["X", "Y"]

# 'Foo' is ignored
data = {"FP3": 1, "FP4": 2, "X": 3, "Y": 4, "Foo": 5}

eegData = {x: data[x] for x in data if x in eegKeys}
gyroData = {x: data[x] for x in data if x in gyroKeys}

print(eegData, gyroData) # ({'FP4': 2, 'FP3': 1}, {'Y': 4, 'X': 3}) 
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    for x in data if x in eegKeys can just be for x in eegKeys. And maybe make a function to reduce duplication.
    – Alex Hall
    Commented Dec 26, 2016 at 11:08
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    If you're code is working correctly you might want to try Code Review. Commented Dec 26, 2016 at 11:10
  • @AlexHall the OP's code is safer if you don't know beforehand what data will actually contain. Commented Dec 26, 2016 at 11:11
  • @brunodesthuilliers not necessarily, if data is missing a key in eegKeys that might be a good reason to throw an exception.
    – Alex Hall
    Commented Dec 26, 2016 at 11:14
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    @JoséSánchez thanks I did not know this one, next time I will try it out.
    – ppasler
    Commented Dec 27, 2016 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

11

Minor modifications, but this should be only a little bit cleaner:

eegKeys = ["FP3", "FP4"]
gyroKeys = ["X", "Y"]

# 'Foo' is ignored
data = {"FP3": 1, "FP4": 2, "X": 3, "Y": 4, "Foo": 5}

filterByKey = lambda keys: {x: data[x] for x in keys}
eegData = filterByKey(eegKeys)
gyroData = filterByKey(gyroKeys)

print(eegData, gyroData) # ({'FP4': 2, 'FP3': 1}, {'Y': 4, 'X': 3})

Or, if you prefer an one-liner:

eegKeys = ["FP3", "FP4"]
gyroKeys = ["X", "Y"]

# 'Foo' is ignored
data = {"FP3": 1, "FP4": 2, "X": 3, "Y": 4, "Foo": 5}

[eegData, gyroData] = map(lambda keys: {x: data[x] for x in keys}, [eegKeys, gyroKeys])

print(eegData, gyroData) # ({'FP4': 2, 'FP3': 1}, {'Y': 4, 'X': 3})
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    Thank you! It looks a lot cleaner to extract the dict comprehension, but as mentioned in comments I prefer a real method over a lambda expression.
    – ppasler
    Commented Dec 27, 2016 at 17:20
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No, two dict comprehensions are pretty much it. You can use dictionary views to select the keys that are present, perhaps:

eegData = {key: data[key] for key in data.keys() & eegKeys}
gyroData = {key: data[key] for key in data.keys() & gyroKeys}

Use data.viewkeys() if you are using Python 2 still.

Dictionary views give you a set-like object, on which you can then use set operations; & gives you the intersection.

Note that your approach, using key in eegKeys and key in gyroKeys could be sped up by inverting the loop (loop over the smaller list, not the bigger dictionary):

eegData = {key: data[key] for key in eegKeys if key in data}
gyroData = {key: data[key] for key in gyroKeys if key in data}
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    Thanks, inverting the loop is a great idea!
    – ppasler
    Commented Dec 27, 2016 at 17:18
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If you are in Python 3, an updated inline solution could be:

second_dict = dict((d, first_dict.pop(d)) for d in split_keys)

pop would gently remove elements from the first dict and the generator with create the mapping to be passed to the dict constructor. Also you can use the good old dict comprehension.

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    I'd suggest {d: first_dict.pop(d) for d in split_keys} for readability, but it’s just a matter of taste really.
    – ntninja
    Commented Feb 14, 2022 at 17:26

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