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During learning about C++ by reading a book I have seen this (for me) strange line of code.

char ch('AB'); // Or char ch = 'AB';

It is strange for me because I don't get that you can assign to a char multiple "letters" without getting any exception.

cout << "Characters in ch: " << ch << endl; // Output B

Why does this work? And how is it working internally? Is it only saving the last character and ignoring the other ones?

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  • You'll get warned by the compiler. coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/26a2279249229f4c – πάντα ῥεῖ Dec 26 '16 at 12:23
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    The exact behavior is implementation defined, according to the specifications. If that same book does not mention to use this with a specific compiler, then it's a grave error. – Jongware Dec 26 '16 at 12:25
  • Btw assigning to many characters which can't be saved as one integer is (at least in visual studio) showing a warning. – Matthias Herrmann Dec 26 '16 at 12:51
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It's called a multicharacter literal which are completely valid C++:

Multicharacter literal, e.g. 'AB', has type int and implementation-defined value.

[...]

Many implementations of multicharacter literals use the values of each char in the literal to initialize successive bytes of the resulting integer, in big-endian order, e.g. the value of '\1\2\3\4' is 0x01020304.

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    The notes on that page say "Many implementations of multicharacter literal" - not "all", so it may not be "completely valid". – Jongware Dec 26 '16 at 12:28
  • Ok, ty thought at first every character is represented by a single byte but I was wrong – Matthias Herrmann Dec 26 '16 at 12:30
  • @RadLexus The note you're referring to explains how many implementations implement the behavior. The standard still guarantees that all implementations must implement some behavior, which makes the construct valid C++. Only any specific behavior is not guaranteed regarding the value of the literal. – emlai Dec 26 '16 at 12:36
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    The specifications are (possibly deliberately) vague. The construct is valid (it will do something) but what happens next is left to implementation. So using OP's example, perhaps c1 = 'AB'; c2 = 'A'; yields true for c1 == c2. – Jongware Dec 26 '16 at 12:40
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It is strange for me because I don't get that you can assign to a char multiple "letters" without getting any exception.

You should see it as a type conversion (demo):

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    {
        int i = 'abcd';
        char c = i; // cast form int to char -> c == 'd'
        cout << c; // prints 'd'
    }

    {
        char c = 'abcd'; // cast form int to char -> c == 'd'
        cout << c; // prints 'd'
    }

    return 0;
}

The order in which the characters are stored in int is not specified by standard. However, a well designed compiler will consider endianness when storing a multi-character constant: GCC and VisualC behaves the same way.

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    Note that the C++ standard doesn't guarantee that this will print 'd'. (A specific compiler may guarantee that though.) – emlai Dec 26 '16 at 12:42
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    See my edited answer. – zdf Dec 26 '16 at 13:16

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