111

I need the following results

100.12 -> 100.00
100.44 -> 100.00
100.50 -> 101.00
100.75 -> 101.00

.round() or .setScale() ? How do I go about this?

0

7 Answers 7

195

You can use setScale() to reduce the number of fractional digits to zero. Assuming value holds the value to be rounded:

BigDecimal scaled = value.setScale(0, RoundingMode.HALF_UP);
System.out.println(value + " -> " + scaled);

Using round() is a bit more involved as it requires you to specify the number of digits to be retained. In your examples this would be 3, but this is not valid for all values:

BigDecimal rounded = value.round(new MathContext(3, RoundingMode.HALF_UP));
System.out.println(value + " -> " + rounded);

(Note that BigDecimal objects are immutable; both setScale and round will return a new object.)

5
  • 1
    It's not working: 100.12 : 100.12, 100.44 : 100.44, 100.50 : 100.5, 100.75 : 100.75 Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 13:30
  • 3
    No, setting scale returns a new decimal that isn't same as the first. For example:BigDecimal bd1 = new BigDecimal(100.12); BigDecimal bd2 = bd1.setScale(0, RoundingMode.HALF_UP); System.out.println(bd1.equals(bd2)); prints false Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 13:44
  • 6
    @Daniel: That was already implied in the code snippet I posted in my answer. I've now made it explicit.
    – Grodriguez
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 14:00
  • RoundingMode what is that? It's BigDecimal
    – trilogy
    Commented Nov 9, 2018 at 14:44
  • docs.oracle.com/javase/9/docs/api/java/math/…
    – Grodriguez
    Commented Nov 12, 2018 at 9:27
17

If i go by Grodriguez's answer

System.out.println("" + value);
value = value.setScale(0, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
System.out.println("" + value);

This is the output

100.23 -> 100
100.77 -> 101

Which isn't quite what i want, so i ended up doing this..

System.out.println("" + value);
value = value.setScale(0, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
value = value.setScale(2, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
System.out.println("" + value);

This is what i get

100.23 -> 100.00
100.77 -> 101.00

This solves my problem for now .. : ) Thank you all.

3
  • 9
    I am curious about the statement that the first result "isn't quite what I want...". If you are actually concerned about output formatting, you can use DecimalFormat (as in new DecimalFormat("###.00") ) to manage the conversion of a BigDecimal back to string. It gives "101.00" as the result for both values that the snippets from @Grodriquez and you created.
    – joel.neely
    Commented Apr 19, 2016 at 11:35
  • 5
    The second time you are rounding here is unnecessary as you know you have an integer already, so I would use BigDecimal.ROUND_UNNECESSARY instead, a bit more clear in my opinion.
    – kosmoplan
    Commented Apr 5, 2017 at 12:39
  • 1
    Answer needs updating (due to deprecation). Should be value.setScale(2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP)
    – mwarren
    Commented Feb 23 at 13:13
5

Here's an awfully complicated solution, but it works:

public static BigDecimal roundBigDecimal(final BigDecimal input){
    return input.round(
        new MathContext(
            input.toBigInteger().toString().length(),
            RoundingMode.HALF_UP
        )
    );
}

Test Code:

List<BigDecimal> bigDecimals =
    Arrays.asList(new BigDecimal("100.12"),
        new BigDecimal("100.44"),
        new BigDecimal("100.50"),
        new BigDecimal("100.75"));
for(final BigDecimal bd : bigDecimals){
    System.out.println(roundBigDecimal(bd).toPlainString());
}

Output:

100
100
101
101

2
  • Not to endorse this solution or anything, but the input.toBigInteger().toString().length() part would be much more efficient by using a logarithm, some thing like round_up(log(input)) + (1 if input is a power of ten, else 0)
    – Addison
    Commented May 21, 2019 at 16:27
  • 2
    BigDecimal seems like a steaming heap.
    – MarkHu
    Commented Sep 17, 2021 at 20:50
3

Simply look at:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/BigDecimal.html#ROUND_HALF_UP

and:

setScale(int precision, int roundingMode)

Or if using Java 6, then

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/RoundingMode.html#HALF_UP

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/math/MathContext.html

and either:

setScale(int precision, RoundingMode mode);
round(MathContext mc);
0

I don't think you can round it like that in a single command. Try

    ArrayList<BigDecimal> list = new ArrayList<BigDecimal>();
    list.add(new BigDecimal("100.12"));
    list.add(new BigDecimal("100.44"));
    list.add(new BigDecimal("100.50"));
    list.add(new BigDecimal("100.75"));

    for (BigDecimal bd : list){
        System.out.println(bd+" -> "+bd.setScale(0,RoundingMode.HALF_UP).setScale(2));
    }

Output:
100.12 -> 100.00
100.44 -> 100.00
100.50 -> 101.00
100.75 -> 101.00

I tested for the rest of your examples and it returns the wanted values, but I don't guarantee its correctness.

0

If neither .round() nor .setScale() seem intuitive to you, you can use this code to round to any integer steps of precision (e.g. round in 10s, 25s, 50s, 100s, ...).

Usage:

int distance = roundN(_distance, 5);

Declaration:

public static BigDecimal roundN(BigDecimal num, int precision){
    BigDecimal remainder = num.remainder(BigDecimal.valueOf(precision));
    System.out.println("remainder: " + remainder);

    if (remainder.compareTo(BigDecimal.valueOf((precision / 2))) < 0 ){
        System.out.println("round down");
        return num.subtract(remainder);
    } else {
        BigDecimal neg = remainder.negate().add(BigDecimal.valueOf(precision));
        System.out.println("round up");
        return num.add(neg);
    }
}

Trailing .00 can be appended to the result on demand.

-2

You want

round(new MathContext(0));  // or perhaps another math context with rounding mode HALF_UP
1
  • 4
    This does nothing. From the documentation of round: "If the precision setting is 0 then no rounding takes place."
    – Grodriguez
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 13:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.