468

I have a DetailsView with a TextBox and I want the input data be saved always with the FIRST LETTER IN CAPITAL.

Example:

"red" --> "Red"
"red house" --> " Red house"

How can I achieve this maximizing performance?


NOTE:
Based on the answers and the comments under the answers, many people think this is asking about capitalizing all words in the string. E.g. => Red House It isn't, but if that is what you seek, look for one of the answers that uses TextInfo's ToTitleCase method. (NOTE: Those answers are incorrect for the question actually asked.)
See TextInfo.ToTitleCase doc for caveats (doesn't touch all-caps words - they are considered acronyms; may lowercase letters in middle of words that "shouldn't" be lowered, e.g. "McDonald" => "Mcdonald"; not guaranteed to handle all culture-specific subtleties re capitalization rules.)


NOTE:
The question is ambiguous as to whether letters after the first should be forced to lower case. The accepted answer assumes that only the first letter should be altered. If you want to force all letters in the string except the first to be lower case, look for an answer containing ToLower, and not containing ToTitleCase.

  • 7
    @Bobby: It's not a duplicate: the OP asks to capitalize the first letter of a string, the question in the link capitalizes the first letter of each word. – GvS Nov 9 '10 at 16:31
  • 1
    @GvS: The first answer is very detailed and the first code-block is exactly what he is looking for. Also, between capitalising every word and only the first word is just one loop difference. – Bobby Nov 9 '10 at 17:23
  • Did you ever get this resolved successfully? Do you still need help with this? – jcolebrand Dec 14 '10 at 4:19
  • 1
    But you said, and I quote, "Make first letter of EACH WORD upper case". Therefore, why "red house" --> " Red house"? Why the "h" of "house" is not a capital letter? – Guillermo Gutiérrez Oct 30 '12 at 20:02
  • Added an answer since most answers will fail if you have a white space in the start. in order to avoid posting this on each answer, i'll post it here once . – Noctis Oct 22 '14 at 5:35

41 Answers 41

616

Updated to C# 8

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string FirstCharToUpper(this string input) =>
        input switch
        {
            null => throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(input)),
            "" => throw new ArgumentException($"{nameof(input)} cannot be empty", nameof(input)),
            _ => input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + input.Substring(1)
        };
}

C# 7

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string FirstCharToUpper(this string input)
    {
        switch (input)
        {
            case null: throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(input));
            case "": throw new ArgumentException($"{nameof(input)} cannot be empty", nameof(input));
            default: return input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + input.Substring(1);
        }
    }
}

Really old answers

public static string FirstCharToUpper(string input)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        throw new ArgumentException("ARGH!");
    return input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + String.Join("", input.Skip(1));
}

EDIT: This version is shorter. For a faster solution take a look at Equiso's answer

public static string FirstCharToUpper(string input)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        throw new ArgumentException("ARGH!");
    return input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + input.Substring(1);
}

EDIT 2: Probably the fastest solution is Darren's (There's even a benchmark) although I would change it's string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) validation to throw an exception since the original requirement expects for a first letter to exist so it can be uppercased. Note that this code works for a generic string and not particularly on valid values from the Textbox.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Because first parameter of String.Join is separator with which to join strings given with second parameter. – Dialecticus Feb 10 '12 at 16:11
  • 29
    I really like your answer, but var arr = input.ToCharArray(); arr[0] = Char.ToUpperInvariant(arr[0]); return new String(arr); would probably gain some speed since you are creating less immutable objects (and especially you are skipping the String.Join). This of course depends on the length of the string. – flindeberg Aug 26 '13 at 14:22
  • 3
    Awesome - Using Linq makes it very clear what this code does. – Daniel James Bryars Nov 27 '13 at 15:12
  • 8
    Hmmm... Technically, this should return "Argh!" to keep with the Upper Case First Letter rule. ;) – jp2code Apr 24 '15 at 19:52
  • 2
    @jp2code Since capitalizing a nonexistent first letter in a null or empty string is like getting slapped by a pregnant dolphing, then the ALL CAPS ARGH! is the correct spelling. urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=ARGH&defid=67839 – Carlos Muñoz May 4 '15 at 17:03
333
public string FirstLetterToUpper(string str)
{
    if (str == null)
        return null;

    if (str.Length > 1)
        return char.ToUpper(str[0]) + str.Substring(1);

    return str.ToUpper();
}

Old answer: This makes every first letter to upper case

public string ToTitleCase(string str)
{
    return CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str.ToLower());
}
| improve this answer | |
  • But this converts every first letter of a word to uppercase, not only the first character of a string. – GvS Nov 9 '10 at 15:42
  • 19
    He asks "red house" => "Red house". ToTitleCase will give you "Red House". – GvS Nov 9 '10 at 15:47
  • 1
    @GvS, yes that is why I say that that was my old answer and make every first letter to uppercase – Diego Torres Nov 9 '10 at 16:34
  • 1
    helpful to me. Great – Ehsan Sajjad Dec 29 '15 at 16:50
  • 1
    Not sure about this but char + string causes a boxing. Just in case max performance is the requirement. – nawfal Sep 13 '17 at 4:39
169

The right way is to use Culture:

System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(word.ToLower())

Note: This will capitalise each word within a string, e.g. "red house" --> "Red House". The solution will also lower-case capitalisation within words, e.g. "old McDonald" --> "Old Mcdonald".

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    This is the most proper way to do it rather than reinvent the wheel and try to write you own version of this. – Alexey Shevelyov Jul 13 '16 at 18:44
  • 12
    The issue I have with this is that it will wipe potentially valid capital letters that are mid-string. e.g. McNames – Jecoms Sep 24 '16 at 21:23
  • 32
    This is an incorrect answer for the reason that "red house" becomes "Red House" (notice the "H")! – spaark Sep 28 '16 at 9:04
  • 22
    Six years after the question was asked, please do a more thorough job of reading existing answers and their comments. If you are convinced you have a better solution, then show the situations in which your answer behaves in a way you think is superior, and specifically how that differs from existing answers. 1) Equiso already covered this option, in second half of his answer. 2) For many situations, ToLower is a mistake, as it wipes out capitalization in middle of word, e.g. "McDonalds". 3) The question is about changing just the first word of the string, not about TitleCase. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:12
  • 12
    This turns input into "Title Case" - so it turns "red horse" into "Red Horse" - while person asking explicitly stated that it should NOT do this (and return "Red horse"). This is not the right way. – Hekkaryk Sep 4 '17 at 21:43
73

I took the fastest method from http://www.dotnetperls.com/uppercase-first-letter and converted to extension method:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase, or mutates any nulls passed into string.Empty
    /// </summary>
    public static string FirstLetterToUpperCaseOrConvertNullToEmptyString(this string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
            return string.Empty;

        char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
        a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
        return new string(a);
    }

NOTE: The reason using ToCharArray is faster than the alternative char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1), is that only one string is allocated, whereas the Substring approach allocates a string for the substring, then a second string to compose the final result.


EDIT: Here is what this approach looks like, combined with the initial test from CarlosMuñoz accepted answer:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase
    /// </summary>
    public static string FirstLetterToUpperCase(this string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
            throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

        char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
        a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
        return new string(a);
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Wow, thanks for finding performance metrics, to show a superior-performance solution! – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 20:19
  • @ToolmakerSteve, I like this solution as it indeed seems faster than others but there's a little problem with this. If you pass null you shouldn't get an empty string as output. In fact I would argue that even passing an empty string should throw an exception since the OP asks for the first letter. Also, you could comment on other people's answer before editing them. – Carlos Muñoz Apr 10 '17 at 22:12
  • 1
    @CarlosMuñoz - it has been discussed in meta, whether to "improve" other people's answers. The consensus was "if you can improve an answer, then do so - no one 'owns' an answer, not even the original author - the goal is to have the best possible answers". You are of course free to edit or rollback the edit. In which case, common courtesy would let the original author's version be the final result, and I would settle for commenting. Usually I also put in a comment the change I am making; I apologize if I did not. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 11 '17 at 3:28
  • 1
    Darren, I'm going to edit your answer to add alternative code, that shows what your solution looks like, with @CarlosMuñoz initial test. I believe your contribution was finding a higher performance solution, and that you won't mind this addition. If you don't like it, please do as you see fit with my edit. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 11 '17 at 4:10
  • 1
    @ToolmakerSteve Agree it should ideally not mutate a null to an empty string, but it is handy for my use case so I'll just rename the original method. – Darren Apr 12 '17 at 0:45
46

You can use "ToTitleCase method"

string s = new CultureInfo("en-US").TextInfo.ToTitleCase("red house");
//result : Red House

this extention method solve every titlecase problem.

easy to usage

string str = "red house";
str.ToTitleCase();
//result : Red house

string str = "red house";
str.ToTitleCase(TitleCase.All);
//result : Red House

the Extention method

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

namespace Test
{
    public static class StringHelper
    {
        private static CultureInfo ci = new CultureInfo("en-US");
        //Convert all first latter
        public static string ToTitleCase(this string str)
        {
            str = str.ToLower();
            var strArray = str.Split(' ');
            if (strArray.Length > 1)
            {
                strArray[0] = ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(strArray[0]);
                return string.Join(" ", strArray);
            }
            return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
        }
        public static string ToTitleCase(this string str, TitleCase tcase)
        {
            str = str.ToLower();
            switch (tcase)
            {
                case TitleCase.First:
                    var strArray = str.Split(' ');
                    if (strArray.Length > 1)
                    {
                        strArray[0] = ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(strArray[0]);
                        return string.Join(" ", strArray);
                    }
                    break;
                case TitleCase.All:
                    return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
                default:
                    break;
            }
            return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
        }
    }

    public enum TitleCase
    {
        First,
        All
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The problem with you solution is that "red house" will be converted to "Red House" and not to "Red house" as it was asked in the question. – Vadim Oct 9 '13 at 19:31
  • 4
    @Tacttin It will work but the following code is easier to read and performs better char.ToUpper(text[0]) + ((text.Length > 1) ? text.Substring(1).ToLower() : string.Empty); You can read more @ vkreynin.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/… – Vadim Oct 10 '13 at 18:07
  • 2
    I don't like this solution, because it combines two quite different situations into one lengthy method. I don't see a conceptual benefit either. And the implementation of capitalizing just the first letter is .. ridiculous. If you want to capitalize the first letter, the obvious implementation is to just capitalize (ToUpper) the first letter. Instead of this, I would have two separate methods. FirstLetterToUpper in Equiso's answer (or in Guillernet's newer answer), and ToTitleCase here, but without the second parameter. Then don't need enum TitleCase. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:04
34

For the first letter, with error checking:

public string CapitalizeFirstLetter(string s)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return s;
    if (s.Length == 1)
        return s.ToUpper();
    return s.Remove(1).ToUpper() + s.Substring(1);
}

And here's the same as a handy extension

public static string CapitalizeFirstLetter(this string s)
    {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(s)) return s;
    if (s.Length == 1) return s.ToUpper();
    return s.Remove(1).ToUpper() + s.Substring(1);
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Clean approach. Thank you! – Philippe Dec 12 '17 at 4:37
12
public static string ToInvarianTitleCase(this string self)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(self))
    {
        return self;
    }

    return CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(self);
}
6

If performance/memory usage is an issue then, this one only creates one (1) StringBuilder and one (1) new String of the same size as the Original string.

public static string ToUpperFirst(this string str) {
  if( !string.IsNullOrEmpty( str ) ) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str);
    sb[0] = char.ToUpper(sb[0]);

    return sb.ToString();

  } else return str;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This could be done with a simple char[] rather than having all the infrastructure of a StringBuilder wrap it. Instead of new StringBuilder(str), use str.ToCharArray(), and instead of sb.ToString(), use new string(charArray). StringBuilder emulates the type of indexing that a character array exposes natively, so the actual .ToUpper line can be essentially the same. :-) – Jonathan Gilbert Nov 17 '16 at 18:49
  • Darren (a year later) shows how to do this using ToCharArray, as suggested by @JonathanGilbert – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 20:38
6

Fastest method.

  private string Capitalize(string s){
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
        char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
        a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
        return new string(a);
}

Tests show next results (string with 10000000 symbols as input): Test results

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I recommend returning s parameter when null or empty. – MatrixRonny Sep 26 '19 at 13:32
6

As this question is about maximizing performance I adopted Darren's version to use Spans, which reduces garbage and improves speed by about 10%.

        /// <summary>
        /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase
        /// </summary>
        public static string ToUpperFirst(this string s)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

            Span<char> a = stackalloc char[s.Length];
            s.AsSpan(1).CopyTo(a.Slice(1));
            a[0] = char.ToUpper(s[0]);
            return new string(a);
        }

Performance

|  Method |      Data |      Mean |     Error |    StdDev |
|-------- |---------- |----------:|----------:|----------:|
|  Carlos |       red | 107.29 ns | 2.2401 ns | 3.9234 ns |
|  Darren |       red |  30.93 ns | 0.9228 ns | 0.8632 ns |
| Marcell |       red |  26.99 ns | 0.3902 ns | 0.3459 ns |
|  Carlos | red house | 106.78 ns | 1.9713 ns | 1.8439 ns |
|  Darren | red house |  32.49 ns | 0.4253 ns | 0.3978 ns |
| Marcell | red house |  27.37 ns | 0.3888 ns | 0.3637 ns |

Full test code

using System;
using System.Linq;

using BenchmarkDotNet.Attributes;

namespace CorePerformanceTest
{
    public class StringUpperTest
    {
        [Params("red", "red house")]
        public string Data;

        [Benchmark]
        public string Carlos() => Data.Carlos();

        [Benchmark]
        public string Darren() => Data.Darren();

        [Benchmark]
        public string Marcell() => Data.Marcell();
    }

    internal static class StringExtensions
    {
        public static string Carlos(this string input) =>
            input switch
            {
                null => throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(input)),
                "" => throw new ArgumentException($"{nameof(input)} cannot be empty", nameof(input)),
                _ => input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + input.Substring(1)
            };

        public static string Darren(this string s)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

            char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
            a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
            return new string(a);
        }

        public static string Marcell(this string s)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

            Span<char> a = stackalloc char[s.Length];
            s.AsSpan(1).CopyTo(a.Slice(1));
            a[0] = char.ToUpper(s[0]);
            return new string(a);
        }
    }

}

Edit: There was a typeo, instead of s[0], was a[0] - this results with cupying same, empty value to the allocated Span a.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    You should probably safe-guard against super long strings. stackalloc will smash the stack if you have more than around ~1MB of characters. – l33t Sep 14 at 8:40
  • Please see my improved answer, using string.Create(). – l33t Sep 14 at 14:15
5

Try this:

static public string UpperCaseFirstCharacter(this string text) {
    return Regex.Replace(text, "^[a-z]", m => m.Value.ToUpper());
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    or perhaps some other character class (i.e. alphanumeric \w), so that the function is unicode-aware – Dmitry Ledentsov Aug 26 '13 at 12:51
  • @DmitryLedentsov- C# string class is built on UTF-16 characters. String Class "Represents text as a sequence of UTF-16 code units." – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:23
5

Since I happened to be working on this also, and was looking around for any ideas, this is the solution I came to. It uses LINQ, and will be able to capitalize the first letter of a string, even if the first occurrence isn't a letter. Here's the extension method I ended up making.

public static string CaptalizeFirstLetter(this string data)
{
    var chars = data.ToCharArray();

    // Find the Index of the first letter
    var charac = data.First(char.IsLetter);
    var i = data.IndexOf(charac);

    // capitalize that letter
    chars[i] = char.ToUpper(chars[i]);

    return new string(chars);
}

I'm sure there's a way to optimize or clean this up a little bit.

| improve this answer | |
4

If you only care about first letter being capitalized and it does not matter the rest of the string you can just select the first character, make it upper case and concatenate it with the rest of the string without the original first character.

String word ="red house";
word = word[0].ToString().ToUpper() + word.Substring(1, word.length -1);
//result: word = "Red house"

We need to convert the first character ToString() because we are reading it as a Char array, and Char type does not have ToUpper() method.

| improve this answer | |
4

Check if the string is not null then convert the first character to upper case and the rest of them to lower case:

public static string FirstCharToUpper(string str)
{
    return str?.First().ToString().ToUpper() + str?.Substring(1).ToLower();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the small solution instead of few lines of code just for a string word! – Imran Faruqi Jan 22 at 8:07
3

Here's a way to do it as an extension method:

static public string UpperCaseFirstCharacter(this string text)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
    {
        return string.Format(
            "{0}{1}",
            text.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper(),
            text.Substring(1));
    }

    return text;
}

Can then be called like:

//yields "This is Brian's test.":
"this is Brian's test.".UpperCaseFirstCharacter(); 

And here's some unit tests for it:

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_ZeroLength_ReturnsOriginal()
{
    string orig = "";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual(orig, result);
}

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_SingleCharacter_ReturnsCapital()
{
    string orig = "c";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual("C", result);
}

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_StandardInput_CapitalizeOnlyFirstLetter()
{
    string orig = "this is Brian's test.";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual("This is Brian's test.", result);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    string.Format is overkill; simply do text.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper() + text.Substring(1). – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:26
3

I found something here http://www.dotnetperls.com/uppercase-first-letter :

static string UppercaseFirst(string s)
{
// Check for empty string.
if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
{
    return string.Empty;
}
// Return char and concat substring.
return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
}

maybe this helps!!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How is this an improvement over Equiso's answer 4 years earlier? – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:18
2

This will do it although it will also make sure that there are no errant capitals that are not at the beginning of the word.

public string(string s)
{
System.Globalization.CultureInfo c = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-us", false)
System.Globalization.TextInfo t = c.TextInfo;

return t.ToTitleCase(s);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Needs a null check of s before the call to ToTitleCase. – Taras Alenin May 11 '14 at 3:02
  • @CarlosMuñoz tlhIngan Hol does not have letter casing in its script. :-) – Jonathan Gilbert Nov 17 '16 at 18:52
2

There seems to be a lot of complexity here when all you need is:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase if a letter
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>Null input returns null</remarks>
    public static string FirstLetterToUpperCase(this string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s))
            return s;

        return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
    }

Noteworthy points:

  1. Its an extension method.

  2. If the input is null, empty or whitespace the input is returned as is.

  3. String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace was introduced with .NET Framework 4. This won't work with older frameworks.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I don't see how this is an improvement on the original accepted answer from four years ago. In fact, it is inconsistent (harmlessly so, but four years late, I have high standards for a new answer adding benefit): The only benefit of using the newer IsNullOrWhiteSpace rather than IsNullOrEmpty, is if you are going to find and change the first non-white-space. But you don't - you always operate on s[0]. So its pointless [both semantically and performance] to use IsNullOrWhiteSpace. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:50
  • 1
    ... why this usage of IsNullOrWhiteSpace troubles me, is that a careless reader might think "He checked for white space, so the following code really does find and change a letter, even if it is preceded by white space". Since your code will fail to change a "first" letter preceded by white space, using IsNullOrWhiteSpace can only mislead a reader. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:56
  • ... oops, I don't mean the accepted answer, I mean Equiso's answer from the same time period. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 20:04
1
string emp="TENDULKAR";
string output;
output=emp.First().ToString().ToUpper() + String.Join("", emp.Skip(1)).ToLower();
| improve this answer | |
  • Why ToLower() at the tail?. There is no requirement for other letters but the first one. – Carlos Muñoz Oct 22 '13 at 16:41
  • String is can be anything its Upper or Lower.so its a generic solution for all string. – Shailesh Nov 11 '13 at 4:55
  • Why Join instead of emp.First().ToString().ToUpper() + emp.Substring(1);? Probably need to be more defensive too: output = string.IsNullOrEmpty(emp) ? string.Empty : [...]. Also, fwiw, agree with @CarlosMuñoz -- you don't need the ToLower() for the OP's question. – ruffin Aug 18 '15 at 19:17
  • @ ruffin--> using Substring is also good writing style of code,I agree your solution to trim a code but in this case writing a ToLower() is good programing practice.string can be anything In Upper case or Lower case depends upon user input, i give a generic solution. – Shailesh Sep 23 '15 at 12:19
  • @Shailesh - However, the question did not request that only the first letter be a capital. It asked that the first letter be changed to be a capital. Without further clarification from author, the most natural assumption is that the remainder of the string be unchanged. Given that you are answering three years later, please assume that the accepted answer does what asker requested. Only give a different answer if there is some technical reason to do it differently. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:40
1

I wanted to provide a "MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE" answer. In my mind, a "MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE" answer catches all scenarios and provides the answer to the question accounting for those scenarios. So, here is my answer. With these reasons:

  1. IsNullOrWhiteSpace accounts for strings that are just spaces or null/empty.
  2. .Trim() removes whitespace from the front and back of the string.
  3. .First() takes the first character of an ienumerable (or string).
  4. We should check to see if it is a letter that can/should be uppercase.
  5. We then add the rest of the string, only if the length indicates we should.
  6. By .Net best practice, we should provide a culture under System.Globalization.CultureInfo.
  7. Providing them as optional parameters makes this method totally reusable, without having to type the chosen culture every time.

    public static string capString(string instring, string culture = "en-US", bool useSystem = false)
    {
        string outstring;
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(instring))
        {
            return "";
        }
        instring = instring.Trim();
        char thisletter = instring.First();
        if (!char.IsLetter(thisletter))
        {
            return instring;   
        }
        outstring = thisletter.ToString().ToUpper(new CultureInfo(culture, useSystem));
        if (instring.Length > 1)
        {
            outstring += instring.Substring(1);
        }
        return outstring;
    }
    
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While this covers most cases, wouldn't it be rather slow considering the number of strings being created with each operation? There is a ton of string allocation going on here. Preferably it would be allocated once, and only once. – Douglas Gaskell Aug 10 '18 at 0:45
1

Recently I had a similar requirement and remembered that the LINQ function Select() provides an index:

string input;
string output;

input = "red house";
output = String.Concat(input.Select((currentChar, index) => index == 0 ? Char.ToUpper(currentChar) : currentChar));
//output = "Red house"

Since I need that very often I made an extension method for the string type:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string FirstLetterToUpper(this string input)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
            return string.Empty;
        return String.Concat(input.Select((currentChar, index) => index == 0 ? Char.ToUpper(currentChar) : currentChar));
    }
}

Please note that only the first letter is converted to upper case - all remaining characters are not touched. If you need the other characters to be lower case you may also call Char.ToLower(currentChar) for index > 0 or call ToLower() on the whole string in the first place.

Regarding performance I compared the code with the solution from Darren. On my machine Darren's code is about 2 times faster which is no surprise since he's directly editing only the first letter within a char array. So I suggest you take Darren's code if you need the fastest solution available. If you want to integrate other string manipulations as well it may be convenient to have the expressive power of a lambda function touching the characters of the input string - you can easily extend this function - so I leave this solution here.

| improve this answer | |
  • I was wondering how I would solve this problem, worked out my own solution, then came back to post it only to find you had come up with the exact same solution I had already. +1 to you! – BlueFuzzyThing Jan 9 at 15:18
  • Thank you very much. – Grimm Jan 9 at 16:49
1

I think the below method is the best solution

    class Program
{
    static string UppercaseWords(string value)
    {
        char[] array = value.ToCharArray();
        // Handle the first letter in the string.
        if (array.Length >= 1)
        {
            if (char.IsLower(array[0]))
            {
                array[0] = char.ToUpper(array[0]);
            }
        }
        // Scan through the letters, checking for spaces.
        // ... Uppercase the lowercase letters following spaces.
        for (int i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            if (array[i - 1] == ' ')
            {
                if (char.IsLower(array[i]))
                {
                    array[i] = char.ToUpper(array[i]);
                }
            }
        }
        return new string(array);
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        // Uppercase words in these strings.
        const string value1 = "something in the way";
        const string value2 = "dot net PERLS";
        const string value3 = "String_two;three";
        const string value4 = " sam";
        // ... Compute the uppercase strings.
        Console.WriteLine(UppercaseWords(value1));
        Console.WriteLine(UppercaseWords(value2));
        Console.WriteLine(UppercaseWords(value3));
        Console.WriteLine(UppercaseWords(value4));
    }
}

Output

Something In The Way
Dot Net PERLS
String_two;three
 Sam

ref

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1

Using string.Create() and avoiding the throw keyword in our method (yes, you read it right), we can take Marcell's answer one step further. Also, my method handles strings of arbitrary length (e.g. several megabytes of text).

public static string L33t(this string s)
{
    static void ThrowError() => throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        ThrowError();                      // No "throw" keyword to avoid costly IL

    return string.Create(s.Length, s, (chars, state) =>
    {
        state.AsSpan().CopyTo(chars);      // No slicing to save some CPU cycles
        chars[0] = char.ToUpper(chars[0]);
    });
}

Performance

Here are the numbers for benchmarks run on .NET Core 3.1.7, x64. I added a longer string to pinpoint the cost of extra copies.

|  Method |                 Data |      Mean |     Error |    StdDev |    Median |
|-------- |--------------------- |----------:|----------:|----------:|----------:|
|    L33t |                  red |  8.545 ns | 0.4612 ns | 1.3308 ns |  8.075 ns |
| Marcell |                  red |  9.153 ns | 0.3377 ns | 0.9471 ns |  8.946 ns |
|    L33t |            red house |  7.715 ns | 0.1741 ns | 0.4618 ns |  7.793 ns |
| Marcell |            red house | 10.537 ns | 0.5002 ns | 1.4351 ns | 10.377 ns |
|    L33t | red r(...)house [89] | 11.121 ns | 0.6774 ns | 1.9106 ns | 10.612 ns |
| Marcell | red r(...)house [89] | 16.739 ns | 0.4468 ns | 1.3033 ns | 16.853 ns |

Full test code

using System;
using BenchmarkDotNet.Attributes;
using BenchmarkDotNet.Running;

namespace CorePerformanceTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var summary = BenchmarkRunner.Run<StringUpperTest>();
        }
    }

    public class StringUpperTest
    {
        [Params("red", "red house", "red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red red house")]
        public string Data;
        
        [Benchmark]
        public string Marcell() => Data.Marcell();

        [Benchmark]
        public string L33t() => Data.L33t();
    }

    internal static class StringExtensions
    {
        public static string Marcell(this string s)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

            Span<char> a = stackalloc char[s.Length];
            s.AsSpan(1).CopyTo(a.Slice(1));
            a[0] = char.ToUpper(s[0]);
            return new string(a);
        }
        
        public static string L33t(this string s)
        {
            static void ThrowError() => throw new ArgumentException("There is no first letter");

            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
                ThrowError(); // IMPORTANT: Do not "throw" here!

            return string.Create(s.Length, s, (chars, state) =>
            {
                state.AsSpan().CopyTo(chars);
                chars[0] = char.ToUpper(chars[0]);
            });
        }
    }
}

Please let me know if you can make it any faster!

| improve this answer | |
  • Why can't you use the throw keyword after string.IsNullOrEmpty (IMPORTANT: Do not "throw" here!)? – Casper 2 days ago
  • You can use the throw keyword, but its mere existence will prevent certain compiler optimizations, like inlining. You can run the sample with and without it, and you will see that it really does affect performance. – l33t 3 hours ago
0

This capitalizes this first letter and every letter following a space and lower cases any other letter.

public string CapitalizeFirstLetterAfterSpace(string input)
{
    System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder(input);
    bool capitalizeNextLetter = true;
    for(int pos = 0; pos < sb.Length; pos++)
    {
        if(capitalizeNextLetter)
        {
            sb[pos]=System.Char.ToUpper(sb[pos]);
            capitalizeNextLetter = false;
        }
        else
        {
            sb[pos]=System.Char.ToLower(sb[pos]);
        }

        if(sb[pos]=' ')
        {
            capitalizeNextLetter=true;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Or if you don't want to write walls of code - CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(theString); does the same thing. – Chev Nov 9 '10 at 15:48
  • Yeah... I didn't know about that :) And due to my massive amount of code, everyone else's answers popped up while I was still typing. – thattolleyguy Nov 9 '10 at 15:51
  • 1
    UPVOTED: 1) A slight difference between this answer and ToTitleCase, is that this answer forces words that are all caps to become TitleCase, whereas ToTitleCase leaves such words alone (assumes they might be acronyms). This might or might not be what is desired. An advantage of having a code example like this, is that it can be modified as desired. 2) this won't handle white space other than ' ' correctly. should replace blank test with white space test. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 12 '17 at 0:06
0

Use the following code:

string  strtest ="PRASHANT";
strtest.First().ToString().ToUpper() + strtest.Remove(0, 1).ToLower();
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Its not even worth a point to my rep to downvote this answer added years later, that is obviously equivalent to already existing answers. If you are going to add a new answer to a question with many answers, please explain what you believe is superior about your answer, or under what circumstances your answer would be more useful than other answers. Be specific. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 20:10
0

Seems like none of the solutions given here will deal with a white space before the string.

Just adding this as a thought:

public static string SetFirstCharUpper2(string aValue, bool aIgonreLeadingSpaces = true)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(aValue))
        return aValue;

    string trimmed = aIgonreLeadingSpaces 
           ? aValue.TrimStart() 
           : aValue;

    return char.ToUpper(trimmed[0]) + trimmed.Substring(1);
}   

It should handle this won't work on other answers (that sentence has a space in the beginning), and if you don't like the space trimming, just pass a false as second parameter (or change the default to false, and pass true if you want to deal with space)

| improve this answer | |
0

FluentSharp has the lowerCaseFirstLetter method which does this

https://github.com/o2platform/FluentSharp/blob/700dc35759db8e2164771a71f73a801aa9379074/FluentSharp.CoreLib/ExtensionMethods/System/String_ExtensionMethods.cs#L575

| improve this answer | |
0

the following function is correct for all ways:

static string UppercaseWords(string value)
{
    char[] array = value.ToCharArray();
    // Handle the first letter in the string.
    if (array.Length >= 1)
    {
        if (char.IsLower(array[0]))
        {
            array[0] = char.ToUpper(array[0]);
        }
    }
    // Scan through the letters, checking for spaces.
    // ... Uppercase the lowercase letters following spaces.
    for (int i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        if (array[i - 1] == ' ')
        {
            if (char.IsLower(array[i]))
            {
                array[i] = char.ToUpper(array[i]);
            }
        }
    }
    return new string(array);
}

I found that here

| improve this answer | |
  • Why? Why add yet another answer when there are already so many answers that seem similar? What's wrong with all the existing answers, that prompted you to add another one? – ToolmakerSteve Apr 10 '17 at 19:31
  • Because this answare is correct for all ways. Take it easy. – user4266998 Apr 11 '17 at 12:26
  • I am sorry; I was unnecessarily harsh. I'll stick to the facts: 1) This is essentially the same as thattolleyguy's answer seven years earlier. 2) This has the same flaw as that answer: doesn't handle white space other than blank character. 3) This answers a slightly different question than OP was asking. Use an answer like this if you want all words to have first letter capitalized. 4) Usually, the simpler way to accomplish that is to use TitleInfo.ToTitleCase. (On the other hand, an advantage of code sample is can customize as desired.) – ToolmakerSteve Apr 12 '17 at 0:15
  • Correcting myself: This is different than thattolleyguy's approach: it leaves untouched letters that aren't the first letter of the word. Instead, it is a duplicate of zamoldar's answer. Favorably, kudos to Darian for giving the link to the source - it seems zamoldar plagiarized without giving credit. Because of providing that source link, and thereby improving the discussion, I am upvoting this answer, despite my criticism of it. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 12 '17 at 0:48
  • 1
    Darian, two improvements that could be made: 1) use char.IsWhiteSpace( array[ i -1 ] ) instead of .. == ' ', to handle all white space. 2) remove the two places that do if (char.isLower(..)) - they serve no purpose. ToUpper simply does nothing if a character isn't lower case. – ToolmakerSteve Apr 12 '17 at 0:59
0

Expanding on Carlos' question above, if you want to capitalize multiple sentences you may use this code:

    /// <summary>
    /// Capitalize first letter of every sentence. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="inputSting"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public string CapitalizeSentences (string inputSting)
    {
        string result = string.Empty;
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(inputSting))
        {
            string[] sentences = inputSting.Split('.');

            foreach (string sentence in sentences)
            {
                result += string.Format ("{0}{1}.", sentence.First().ToString().ToUpper(), sentence.Substring(1)); 
            }
        }

        return result; 
    }
| improve this answer | |
0

Possible solution to resolve your problem .

   public static string FirstToUpper(this string lowerWord)
   {
       if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(lowerWord) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(lowerWord))
            return lowerWord;
       return new StringBuilder(lowerWord.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper())
                 .Append(lowerWord.Substring(1))
                 .ToString();
   }
| improve this answer | |