22

I have a varchar column where some values are in mm/dd/yyyy format and some are in yyyymmdd.

I want to convert all mm/dd/yyyy dates into the yyyymmdd format. What is the best way to do this? Thanks

Table is Employees and column is DOB

2
  • 4
    Actual date/datetime-valued columns don't have a format. Do you mean to say you have columns which contain textual representations of dates in char/varchar columns?
    – Dai
    Dec 27 '16 at 23:07
  • 4
    Never store date/time values in varchar columns... Use proper data types instead.
    – jarlh
    Dec 28 '16 at 7:47
42

Assuming your "date" column is not actually a date.

Select convert(varchar(8),cast('12/24/2016' as date),112)

or

Select format(cast('12/24/2016' as date),'yyyyMMdd')

Returns

20161224
7
  • Note that FORMAT's performance is terrible, but there's nothing wrong with using it for scalar calls. If you're using it in a resultset that will be called many times, use CONVERT instead. Aug 7 '18 at 15:47
  • 2
    @DerreckDean Absolutely agree. That's why I listed it as a second "option". I should have expressed that more clearly. Aug 7 '18 at 15:50
  • Heh...IMHO, there is absolutely no justification for using the FORMAT function. It's just too slow. Justifying it for small row counts is a terrible excuse and adds to the performance "Death by a Thousand Cuts" state that a lot of servers are in. That includes "scalar calls". if you have 10,000 of those scalar calls ever second, you'll be in deep Kimchi if you use FORMAT. Just pretend it doesn't exist and do it with some form of CONVERT. Even complex CONVERTs will blow the doors off of FORMAT.
    – Jeff Moden
    Jun 23 '20 at 1:02
  • @JeffModen Like I tell my kids... "never" is a really big word. It is just an option... another tool in the belt. That said, performance aside, there are some useful features in format. When I do use format, I use it sparingly ... usually on final datasets. Not every table is a billion rows and performance is not the only consideration in programming. Jun 23 '20 at 1:19
  • @JohnCappelletti - I guess I'll never understand why people justify the use of known problems just because of smaller row sets. I also agree that accuracy should always be the primary consideration but if you look at the posts of this and other forums, performance is a very close second. Like I tell my kids, never put your hand on a hot stove. :D
    – Jeff Moden
    Jun 23 '20 at 21:52
8
DECLARE @v DATE= '3/15/2013'

SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), @v, 112)

you can convert any date format or date time format to YYYYMMDD with no delimiters

2
3

try this....

SELECT FORMAT(CAST(DOB AS DATE),'yyyyMMdd') FROM Employees;
1
  • No. Don't use FORMAT. It's too damned slow.
    – Jeff Moden
    Jun 23 '20 at 1:03
2

You can do as follows:

Select Format(test.Time, 'yyyyMMdd')
From TableTest test
0
1

In SQL Server, you can do:

select coalesce(format(try_convert(date, col, 112), 'yyyyMMdd'), col)

This attempts the conversion, keeping the previous value if available.

Note: I hope you learned a lesson about storing dates as dates and not strings.

1
Select CONVERT(VARCHAR(8), GETDATE(), 112)

Tested in SQL Server 2012

https://www.w3schools.com/sql/func_sqlserver_convert.asp

0

SELECT YEAR(getdate()) * 10000 + MONTH(getdate()) * 100 + DAY(getdate())

-3

SELECT TO_CHAR(created_at, 'YYYY-MM-DD') FROM table; //converts any date format to YYYY-MM-DD

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