14

I'm new to Elixir and quite frankly, can't understand why function heads are needed when we have multiple clauses with default values. From the official docs:

If a function with default values has multiple clauses, it is required to create a function head (without an actual body) for declaring defaults:

defmodule Concat do
  def join(a, b \\ nil, sep \\ " ")

  def join(a, b, _sep) when is_nil(b) do
    a
  end

  def join(a, b, sep) do
    a <> sep <> b
  end
end

IO.puts Concat.join("Hello", "world")      #=> Hello world
IO.puts Concat.join("Hello", "world", "_") #=> Hello_world
IO.puts Concat.join("Hello")               #=> Hello

I read this and I'm like "Why?". What does this accomplish? It's not as if the two clauses are ambiguous and the compiler won't be able to deduce the right call. Besides, I just don't see how adding a function header helps.

It's likely I'm overlooking something very simple, so I'll be happy to have it explained to me.

2 Answers 2

21

Erlang functions (and therefore Elixir functions) are defined by two entities: name and arity. In your example, def join(a, b \\ nil, sep \\ " ") is still of arity 3 and when the compiler finds the call like join("hello", "world"), she knows that it should be routed to join/3, passing "world" as the second parameter and using a default value for the third one.

If we were allowed to specify default parameters in the function bodies itself, without having this function head, we could end up with:

def join(a, b \\ nil, sep), do: "default b"
def join(a, b, sep \\ nil), do: "default sep"

making a compiler to get stuck on call to join("hello", 42).

Please note, that you are requested for the head function if and only one or more of functions signatures has default parameter(s).

The goal of head function is to explicitly define the signature when called without default parameters values (join("hello").)

9
  • Thanks. Your answer made me realize I don't understand default arguments in Elixir fully (I wonder who downvoted it!). Give me a few minutes and I'll come back with questions or acceptance. :-)
    – ankush981
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:24
  • Why would the compiler "get stuck"? If it were allowed (as it used to be), it would match with the first one, just like it does for any other situation where it has multiple matches.
    – dave
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:38
  • @dave As it used to be? Would it be possible for you to dig up the pull request that changed this? It might have more explanation.
    – ankush981
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 8:04
  • 1
    @dotslash it’s between 0.7.0 and 0.10.0. Those eras Elixir was not yet a mature language, so it was kinda appending a required functionality rather than improving the existing functionality. Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 8:06
  • 1
    Yes, of course. While you are still allowed to have a default function parameter in the middle of parameters list (def join(a, b \\ nil, sep),) this is not possible for multiple match clauses. Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 9:15
3

The only concrete benefit you get from this is that your default arguments will apply to all function calls. If the compiler let you do it the way you are suggesting, the equivalent would look like:

def join(a, b \\ nil, _sep \\ " ") when is_nil(b) do
    a
end

def join(a, b \\ nil, _sep \\ " ") do
    a <> sep <> b
end

The intent of it, from what I understand, is simply to reduce the confusion that can arise with defaults.

7
  • Ah, thank you so much. So it's more of a convenience combined with safety. Makes sense now. :-)
    – ankush981
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:10
  • @mudasobwa Oops. :-)
    – ankush981
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:17
  • @mudasobwa how is this incorrect? he asked specifically about situations where it was unambiguous which function to call
    – dave
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:28
  • I don't think your answer is incorrect, but @mudasobwa gave me the complete picture. :-)
    – ankush981
    Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:38
  • “is simply to reduce the confusion”—here. It is not about to reduce the confusion. It is about to eliminate it to make it ever possible to declare functions with different clauses/guards with defaults. “If the compiler let you do it”—this sentence is also confusing; the compiler not “does not want” to allow, it has no ability to allow. Commented Dec 28, 2016 at 7:39

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