I have an array of objects that looks like this:

var array = [
    {id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
    {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
    {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
    {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
    ...
];

As you can see, some names are repeated. I want to get a new array with names only, but if some name repeats I don't want to add it again. I want this array:

var newArray = ["Name1", "Name2"];

I'm trying to do this with map:

var newArray = array.map((a) => {
    return a.name;
});

But the problem is that this returns:

newArray = ["Name1", "Name1", "Name2", "Name2"];

How can I set some condition inside map, so it won't return an element that already exists? I want to do this with map or some other ECMAScript 5 or ECMAScript 6 feature.

16 Answers 16

up vote 165 down vote accepted

With ES6, you could use Set for unique values, after mapping only the names of the objects.

This proposal uses a spread syntax ... for collecting the items in a new array.

const array = [{ id: 123, value: "value1", name:"Name1" }, { id: 124, value: "value2", name: "Name1" }, { id: 125, value: "value3", name: "Name2" }, { id: 126, value: "value4", name: "Name2" }],
      names = [...new Set(array.map(a => a.name))];

console.log(names);

  • 7
    For my info.. what does ... do? – Rajshekar Reddy Dec 28 '16 at 14:53
  • 7
    @RajshekarReddy, it's a spread syntax ... for building an array with an iterable object. – Nina Scholz Dec 28 '16 at 14:56
  • 5
    I'm not upvoting for the "Set" itself, but rather for the clever use of the spread operator. It's always nice to learn something new or to see something new applied to a practical example, so this post deserves an upvote. – briosheje Dec 28 '16 at 14:58
  • 27
    It's just my personal opinion, but a rather common one. Using Array.from conveys the intent of conversion much better (and also is easier to understand/search for newbies), spread syntax should be used only where the spreaded element is one of many. Maybe calling it a "bad practise" is a bit too harsh, sorry, I just hope to prevent it from becoming a common idiom. – Bergi Dec 28 '16 at 22:55
  • 3
    @KRyan is ES6 so new? It has been finalized in 2015 june. It's time to start understanding and using the new features – edc65 Dec 29 '16 at 12:54

If you are looking for a JavaScript solution that is not ES 6 (no Set) you can use the Array's reduce method:

var array=[
  {id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
  {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
  {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
  {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
];
var names = array.reduce(function (a, b) {
  if (a.indexOf(b.name) == -1) {
    a.push(b.name)
  }
  return a;
}, []);

console.log(names);

  • 2
    This answer also has the benefit that it doesn't require intermediate arrays or sets, especially ones containing only the names themselves. (It goes directly from array of objects to array of objects.) +1 – jpmc26 Dec 28 '16 at 20:27
  • @jpmc26 you are right. And thanks for the vote :) – Dekel Dec 28 '16 at 21:16
  • 1
    @Dekel — Smaller version :) var names = array.reduce(function(a, b) { a.indexOf(b.name) === -1 && a.push(b.name) return a; }, []); – Rayon Jan 6 '17 at 5:10
  • 3
    @Rayon Please don't pay too much attention to the size of the source code, this is a common pitfall for many self made programmers, most importantly, your program should be efficient and readable. – leaf Nov 28 '17 at 6:46
  • 1
    Thanks @AmerllicA :) much appreciated. – Dekel Jun 18 at 18:02

Personally I don't see why everyone is getting all fancy with ES 6. If it were my code I'd prefer to support as many browsers as possible.

var array=[
{id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
{id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
{id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
{id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
];

   // Create array of unique names
var a = (function(a){
  for (var i = array.length; i--;)
    if (a.indexOf(array[i].name) < 0) a.push(array[i].name);
  return a;
})([]);

console.log(a);

  • 2
    Won't it be more performant to use an object as a dictionary instead of indexOf-ing all the time? E.g. do added[name] = true and if(added[name]) instead of if(a.indexOf(name)). – Bojidar Marinov Dec 28 '16 at 17:41
  • 6
    "personally i don't see why everyone is getting all fancy with es6" why are you courting a goto fail, leaking your index variable into the enclosing scope, etc. etc. ES6 was codified into the standard for good reasons, and is for the most part trivially easy to polyfill/transform for older browsers. – Jared Smith Dec 29 '16 at 2:16
  • 4
    More readable? Its a its a freaking for loop that pushes items onto an array. Doesnt get much more readable than that...... – Occam's Razor Dec 29 '16 at 13:10
  • 3
    Quite honestly it just feels like youre trying way too hard to find something to complain about. – Occam's Razor Dec 29 '16 at 14:54
  • 2
    "I am referring to the famous Apple SSL bug" -- It's not that famous that you can just go and refer to it in random comments out of context and expect people to recognize it. – Hejazzman Jan 5 '17 at 19:31

You could also simply combine map with filter

var array = [
  {id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
  {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
  {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
  {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
];

var unique = array
  .map( item => item.name )
  .filter( ( item, idx, arr ) => arr.indexOf( item ) == idx ) 

console.log(unique)

You can do Array.prototype.map() to get an array with the objects name property and than Array.prototype.filter() using the parameters elem, index and array, in the function predicate, to eliminate repeated elements:

var array = [{id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"}, {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"}, {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"}, {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}],
    names = array
      .map(e => e.name)
      .filter((e, i, a) => a.indexOf(e) === i);

console.log(names);

I agree that if you only need the name values, a Set is the way to go.

However, if you want to get an array of unique objects based on the name property, I'd suggest to use a Map. A quick way to create a Map, is via an array of [key, value] arrays:

const array = [{ id: 123, value: "value1", name:"Name1" }, { id: 124, value: "value2", name: "Name1" }, { id: 125, value: "value3", name: "Name2" }, { id: 126, value: "value4", name: "Name2" }],
      unique = new Map(array.map(obj => [obj.name, obj]));

// To get the unique objects
const uniques = Array.from(unique.values());

// Get the names like you already did:
console.log("Names:", uniques.map(obj => obj.name));

// If you ever need the complete array of unique objects, you got a ref:
console.log(JSON.stringify(uniques));
.as-console-wrapper { min-height: 100%; }

An added benefit of Map is that you get both the filter functionality that cuts out the non-uniques, without loosing the connection with the source objects. Of course, it's only needed if you need to reference the unique set of objects multiple times.

Many good answers here. I just would like to contribute with some diversity with hopes to give you another perspective.

Arrays are of object type in JavaScript, so they can be used as a hash at the same time. By using this functionality we can greatly simplify the job to be done in a single reduce operation with O(n) time complexity.

If you are not happy with your array holding some properties other than the array keys you might consider keeping a separate hash object as well.

var array = [{id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
             {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
             {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
             {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
            ],
result = array.reduce((p,c) => p[c.name] ? p : (p[c.name] = true, p.push(c.name), p), []);
console.log(result);

  • This ES5 solution has good performance, but using the array for two purposes is confusing, and dangerous if one of the names is just a number. I would recommend doing the p[c.name] stuff on a separate object o and then discarding it afterwards. – joeytwiddle Feb 28 at 7:59

If you're limited to ES5, I would use Lodash's _.uniq

var newArray = _.uniq(array.map(function(a) {
  return a.name;
}));

With ES6 this should do the job.

var array=[
    {id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
    {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
    {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
    {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}
];

var set = new Set();

array.forEach((a)=>{
    set.add(a.name);
}); 

console.log(Array.from(set));

  • 11
    map is supposed to be used with pure functions, not to have side effects. This would be a job for forEach or reduce. – Vincent van der Weele Dec 28 '16 at 20:04

That's how I did it, using an separate empty array.

var array = [
   {id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},
   {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},
   {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},
   {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}	    
];

var array2 = []		
		
for (i=0; i<array.length;i++){						
   if (array2.indexOf(array[i].name) == -1){				
     array2.push(array[i].name);
    }
}			

console.log(array2)	

Using UnderscoreJS,

array = [{id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"}, {id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"}, {id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"}, {id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}];
get_names =  _.pluck(_.uniq(array, 'name'), 'name')
console.log(get_names)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.8.3/underscore-min.js"></script>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

`

In ES5, use an object as a dictionary for O(n) performance.

This will only work if all the keys are Strings.

var array = [
    {id: 123, value: "value1", name: "Name1"},
    {id: 124, value: "value2", name: "Name1"},
    {id: 125, value: "value3", name: "Name2"},
    {id: 126, value: "value4", name: "Name2"}
];

var allNames = array.map(item => item.name);

var map = {};
allNames.forEach(name => {
  map[name] = true;
});
var uniqueNames = Object.keys(map);

console.log(uniqueNames);

You could do the same thing in one expression if you like:

var uniqueNames = Object.keys(allNames.reduce((m, n) => (m[n] = true, m), {}));

but I find the imperative form easier to read.

  • I used ES6 arrow functions for clarity. If you really are targeting ES5 without a transpiler, then you will need to use the full form instead: function (item) { return item.name; } – joeytwiddle Feb 28 at 8:12
  • As an alternative to Object.keys(), this answer uses filter() to keep only those names which have not yet been stored in the map, which is quite elegant. – joeytwiddle Feb 28 at 9:19

Try this:

nArr = [];
array.forEach((a) => {
    if (nArr.indexOf(a.name) < 0) { 
        nArr.push(a.name); 
    }
}); 

Use array#forEach() and array#indexOf() methods like this if you want maximum compatibility yet, concise syntax:

const array = [{ id: 123, value: "value1", name:"Name1" }, { id: 124, value: "value2", name: "Name1" }, { id: 125, value: "value3", name: "Name2" }, { id: 126, value: "value4", name: "Name2" }]

// initialize an empty array named names
let names = [];

// iterate through every element of `array` & check if it's 'name' key's value already in names array if not ADD it 
array.forEach(function(element) { if (names.indexOf(element.name) === -1) names.push(element.name) });
// or use tilde like this:
//array.forEach(function(element) { if (~names.indexOf(element.name)) names.push(element.name) });

console.log(names);

However, if compatibility is not an issue use ECMAScript 6's Set object, array#map and Array.from() methods like this:

const array = [{ id: 123, value: "value1", name:"Name1" }, { id: 124, value: "value2", name: "Name1" }, { id: 125, value: "value3", name: "Name2" }, { id: 126, value: "value4", name: "Name2" }];

// iterate through every element from array using map and store it in Set(a Set won't have duplicates) then convert the Set back to Array(using Array.from)
let names = Array.from(new Set(array.map(element => element.name)));

console.log(names);

For those seeking a 1 liner

const names = array.reduce((acc, {name}) => acc.includes(name) ? acc : [name, ...acc], []);

or without using methods on the array's prototype

const { reduce, includes } = Array;
const names = reduce(array, (acc, {name}) => includes(acc, name) ? acc : [name, ...acc], []);

could be usefull for writing some pure functions for dealing with this

const get_uniq_values = (key, arr) => reduce(arr, (a, o) => includes(a, o[key]) ? a : [o[key], ...a], []);
var __array=[{id:123, value:"value1", name:"Name1"},{id:124, value:"value2", name:"Name1"},{id:125, value:"value3", name:"Name2"},{id:126, value:"value4", name:"Name2"}];

function __checkArray(__obj){
    var flag = true;
    for(let i=0; i < __array.length; i++){
        if(__obj.id == __array.id){
            flag = false;
            break;
        }
    }

    return flag;
}

var __valToPush = {id: 127, value: "value5", name: "Name3"};
if(__checkArray(__valToPush)){
    __array.push(__valToPush)
}
  • 6
    do you have a special reason to use so much underscores? – Nina Scholz Feb 10 '17 at 20:48

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