43

Example:

variable = new StreamReader( file ).ReadToEnd();

Is that acceptable?

0

6 Answers 6

51

No, this will not close the StreamReader. You need to close it. Using does this for you (and disposes it so it's GC'd sooner):

using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader("file.txt"))
{
  allFileText = r.ReadToEnd();
}

Or alternatively in .Net 2 you can use the new File. static members, then you don't need to close anything:

variable = File.ReadAllText("file.txt");
3
  • 2
    ReadAllText was added in .Net 2.0 (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…)
    – JaredPar
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 18:00
  • Thanks Jared (edited answer). TBH I only came across it recently. Once you know one way you generally tend to stick with what works.
    – badbod99
    Commented Nov 10, 2010 at 10:10
  • 1
    Is there a perfomance difference when using StreamReader.ReadToEnd vs File.ReadAllTest?
    – Mike
    Commented Jul 6, 2018 at 20:24
22

You should always dispose of your resources.

// the using statement automatically disposes the streamreader because
// it implements the IDisposable interface
using( var reader = new StreamReader(file) )
{
    variable = reader.ReadToEnd();
}

Or at least calling it manually:

reader = new StreamReader(file);
variable = reader.ReadToEnd();
reader.Close();
4
  • 1
    For someone who doesn't know that the using statement automatically takes care of this for you, this would be confusing. No down vote, but no up vote either because this is just not worded for a beginner to understand.
    – David
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:24
  • 1
    Added a comment to be helpful
    – Dismissile
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:25
  • 4
    In your second example you don't call Dispose() at all. And there is no try-catch mechanism to make sure that Close() is called. When you add both, a try-catch and a Dispose() call it will result in nothing else than a using, like in your first example.
    – tanascius
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:41
  • 1
    This explains it well however it doesn't mention, as badbod99 and a couple others did, "Or alternatively in .Net 4 you can use the new File. static members, then you don't need to close anything" Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:50
7

You need to Dispose of objects that implement IDisposable. Use a using statement to make sure it gets disposed without explicitly calling the Dispose method.

using (var reader = new StreamReader(file))
{
  variable = reader.ReadToEnd();
}

Alternately, use File.ReadAllText(String)

variable = File.ReadAllText(file);
1
  • +1 but I'd word it "you don't need to explicitly close it if you use a "using" statement to make sure it gets disposed. +1 because this is more clearly worded than Dismissile's answer. His answer does nothing to explain that the using statement will dispose of the resources for you, and someone who didn't know that would be left scratching their head.
    – David
    Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:23
4

Yes, whenever you create a disposable object you must dispose of it preferably with a using statement

using (var reader = new StreamReader(file)) {
  variable = reader.ReadToEnd(file);
}

In this case though you can just use the File.ReadAllText method to simplify the expression

variable = File.ReadAllText(file);
1
  • This was helpful though badbod99 supplied a few more specifics. I'm assuming those specifics are correct as I"m only just getting into code outside of javascript. Commented Nov 9, 2010 at 17:53
0

It's good practice to close StreamReader. Use the following template:

string contents;

using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(file)) 
{
   contents = sr.ReadToEnd();
}
0

You're better off using the using keyword; then you don't need to explicitly close anything.

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