12

I have two similar codes that need to be parsed and I'm not sure of the most pythonic way to accomplish this.

Suppose I have two similar "codes"

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'
secret_code_2 = 'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing'

both codes end with $$otherthing and contain a number of values separated by -

At first I thought of using functools.wrap to separate some of the common logic from the logic specific to each type of code, something like this:

from functools import wraps

def parse_secret(f):
  @wraps(f)
  def wrapper(code, *args):
    _code = code.split('$$')[0]
    return f(code, *_code.split('-'))
  return wrapper

@parse_secret
def parse_code_1b(code, a, b, c):
  a = a.split('|')[0]
  return (a,b,c)

@parse_secret
def parse_code_2b(code, a, b):
  b = b.split('|')[1]
  return (a,b)

However doing it this way makes it kind of confusing what parameters you should actually pass to the parse_code_* functions i.e.

parse_code_1b(secret_code_1)
parse_code_2b(secret_code_2)

So to keep the formal parameters of the function easier to reason about I changed the logic to something like this:

def _parse_secret(parse_func, code):
  _code = code.split('$$')[0]
  return parse_func(code, *_code.split('-'))

def _parse_code_1(code, a, b, c):
  """
  a, b, and c are descriptive parameters that explain
  the different components in the secret code

  returns a tuple of the decoded parts
  """
  a = a.split('|')[0]
  return (a,b,c)

def _parse_code_2(code, a, b):
  """
  a and b are descriptive parameters that explain
  the different components in the secret code

  returns a tuple of the decoded parts
  """
  b = b.split('|')[1]
  return (a,b)

def parse_code_1(code):
  return _parse_secret(_parse_code_1, code)

def parse_code_2(code):
  return _parse_secret(_parse_code_2, code)

Now it's easier to reason about what you pass to the functions:

parse_code_1(secret_code_1)
parse_code_2(secret_code_2)

However this code is significantly more verbose.

Is there a better way to do this? Would an object-oriented approach with classes make more sense here?

repl.it example

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2
+50

repl.it example

Functional approaches are more concise and make more sense.

We can start from expressing concepts in pure functions, the form that is easiest to compose.

Strip $$otherthing and split values:

parse_secret = lambda code: code.split('$$')[0].split('-')

Take one of inner values:

take = lambda value, index: value.split('|')[index]

Replace one of the values with its inner value:

parse_code = lambda values, p, q: \
  [take(v, q) if p == i else v for (i, v) in enumerate(values)]

These 2 types of codes have 3 differences:

  • Number of values
  • Position to parse "inner" values
  • Position of "inner" values to take

And we can compose parse functions by describing these differences. Split values are keep packed so that things are easier to compose.

compose = lambda length, p, q: \
  lambda code: parse_code(parse_secret(code)[:length], p, q)

parse_code_1 = compose(3, 0, 0)
parse_code_2 = compose(2, 1, 1)

And use composed functions:

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'
secret_code_2 = 'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing'
results = [parse_code_1(secret_code_1), parse_code_2(secret_code_2)]
print(results)
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1

I believe something like this could work:

secret_codes = ['asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing', 'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing']


def parse_code(code):
    _code = code.split('$$')
    if '-' in _code[0]:
        return _parse_secrets(_code[1], *_code[0].split('-'))
    return _parse_secrets(_code[0], *_code[1].split('-'))


def _parse_secrets(code, a, b, c=None):
    """
    a, b, and c are descriptive parameters that explain
    the different components in the secret code

    returns a tuple of the decoded parts
    """
    if c is not None:
        return a.split('|')[0], b, c
    return a, b.split('|')[1]


for secret_code in secret_codes:
    print(parse_code(secret_code))

Output:

('asdf', 'sdfg', 'wert')
('qwersdfg', 'er')

I'm not sure about your secret data structure but if you used the index of the position of elements with data that has | in it and had an appropriate number of secret data you could also do something like this and have an infinite(well almost) amount of secrets potentially:

def _parse_secrets(code, *data):
    """
    data is descriptive parameters that explain
    the different components in the secret code

    returns a tuple of the decoded parts
    """
    i = 0
    decoded_secrets = []
    for secret in data:
        if '|' in secret:
            decoded_secrets.append(secret.split('|')[i])
        else:
            decoded_secrets.append(secret)
        i += 1
    return tuple(decoded_secrets)
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1

I'm really not sure what exactly you mean. But I came with idea which might be what you are looking for.

What about using a simple function like this:

def split_secret_code(code): 
    return [code] + code[:code.find("$$")].split("-")

And than just use:

parse_code_1(*split_secret_code(secret_code_1))
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1

I'm not sure exactly what constraints you're working with, but it looks like:

  1. There are different types of codes with different rules
  2. The number of dash separated args can vary
  3. Which arg has a pipe can vary

Straightforward Example

This is not too hard to solve, and you don't need fancy wrappers, so I would just drop them because it adds reading complexity.

def pre_parse(code):
    dash_code, otherthing = code.split('$$')
    return dash_code.split('-')

def parse_type_1(code):
    dash_args = pre_parse(code)
    dash_args[0], toss = dash_args[0].split('|')
    return dash_args

def parse_type_2(code):
    dash_args = pre_parse(code)
    toss, dash_args[1] = dash_args[1].split('|')
    return dash_args

# Example call
parse_type_1(secret_code_1)

Trying to answer question as stated

You can supply arguments in this way by using python's native decorator pattern combined with *, which rolls/unrolls positional arguments into a tuple, so you don't need to know exactly how many there are.

def dash_args(code):
    dash_code, otherthing = code.split('$$')
    return dash_code.split('-')

def pre_parse(f):
    def wrapper(code):
        # HERE is where the outer function, the wrapper,
        # supplies arguments to the inner function.
        return f(code, *dash_args(code))
    return wrapper

@pre_parse
def parse_type_1(code, *args):
    new_args = list(args)
    new_args[0], toss = args[0].split('|')
    return new_args

@pre_parse
def parse_type_2(code, *args):
    new_args = list(args)
    toss, new_args[1] = args[1].split('|')
    return new_args

# Example call:
parse_type_1(secret_code_1)

More Extendable Example

If for some reason you needed to support many variations on this kind of parsing, you could use a simple OOP setup, like

class BaseParser(object):
    def get_dash_args(self, code):
        dash_code, otherthing = code.split('$$')
        return dash_code.split('-')

class PipeParser(BaseParser):
    def __init__(self, arg_index, split_index):
        self.arg_index = arg_index
        self.split_index = split_index

    def parse(self, code):
        args = self.get_dash_args(code)
        pipe_arg = args[self.arg_index]
        args[self.arg_index] = pipe_arg.split('|')[self.split_index]
        return args

# Example call
pipe_parser_1 = PipeParser(0, 0)
pipe_parser_1.parse(secret_code_1)
pipe_parser_2 = PipeParser(1, 1)
pipe_parser_2.parse(secret_code_2)
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1

My suggestion attempts the following:

  • to be non-verbose enough
  • to separate common and specific logic in a clear way
  • to be sufficiently extensible

Basically, it separates common and specific logic into different functions (you could do the same using OOP). The thing is that it uses a mapper variable that contains the logic to select a specific parser, according to each code's content. Here it goes:

    def parse_common(code):
        """
        Provides common parsing logic.
        """
        encoded_components = code.split('$$')[0].split('-')
        return encoded_components

    def parse_code_1(code, components):
        """
        Specific parsing for type-1 codes.
        """
        components[0] = components[0].split('|')[0] # decoding some type-1 component
        return tuple([c for c in components])

    def parse_code_2(code, components):
        """
        Specific parsing for type-2 codes.
        """
        components[1] = components[1].split('|')[1] # decoding some type-2 component
        return tuple([c for c in components])

    def parse_code_3(code, components):
        """
        Specific parsing for type-3 codes.
        """
        components[2] = components[2].split('||')[0] # decoding some type-3 component
        return tuple([c for c in components])

    # ... and so on, if more codes need to be added ...

    # Maps specific parser, according to the number of components
    CODE_PARSER_SELECTOR = [
        (3, parse_code_1),
        (2, parse_code_2),
        (4, parse_code_3)
    ]

    def parse_code(code):
        # executes common parsing
        components = parse_common(code)

        # selects specific parser
        parser_info = [s for s in CODE_PARSER_SELECTOR if len(components) == s[0]]

        if parser_info is not None and len(parser_info) > 0:
            parse_func = parser_info[0][1]
            return parse_func(code, components)
        else:
            raise RuntimeError('No parser found for code: %s' % code)

    secret_codes = [
        'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing',              # type 1 
        'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing',                   # type 2
        'qwersdfg-hjkl-yui||poiuy-rtyu$$otherthing'     # type 3
        ]

    print [parse_code(c) for c in secret_codes]
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  • I Love the parser map idea! – Tom Jan 10 '17 at 16:30
1

Are you married to the string parsing? If you are passing variables with values and are in no need for variable names you can "pack" them into integer.

If you are working with cryptography you can formulate a long hexadecimal number of characters and then pass it as int with "stop" bytes (0000 for example since "0" is actually 48 try: chr(48) ) and if you are married to a string I would suggest a lower character byte identifier for example ( 1 -> aka try: chr(1) ) so you can scan the integer and bit shift it by 8 to get bytes with 8 bit mask ( this would look like (secret_code>>8)&0xf.

Hashing works in similar manner since one variable with somename and somevalue, somename and somevalue can be parsed as integer and then joined with stop module, then retrieved when needed.

Let me give you an example for hashing

# lets say 
a = 1
# of sort hashing would be 
hash = ord('a')+(0b00<<8)+(1<<16)
#where a hashed would be 65633 in integer value on 64 bit computer
# and then you just need to find a 0b00 aka separator

if you want to use only variables ( names don't matter ) then you need to hash only variable value so the size of parsed value is a lot smaller ( not name part and no need for separator (0b00) and you can use separator cleverly to divide necessary data one fold (0b00) twofolds (0b00, 0b00<<8) etc.

a = 1
hash = a<<8 #if you want to shift it 1 byte

But if you want to hide it and you need cryptography example, you can do the above methods and then scramble, shift ( a->b ) or just convert it to another type later. You just need to figure out the order of operations you are doing. Since a-STOP-b-PASS-c is not equal to a-PASS-b-STOP-c.

You can find bitwise operators here binary operators

But have in mind that 65 is number and 65 is a character as well it only matters where are those bytes sent, if they are sent to graphics card they are pixels, if they are sent to audiocard they are sounds and if they are sent to mathematical processing they are numbers, and as programmers that is our playground.

But if this is not answering your problem, you can always use map.

def mapProcces(proccesList,listToMap):

   currentProcces = proccesList.pop(0)
   listToMap = map( currentProcces, listToMap )

   if proccesList != []: 
       return mapProcces( proccesList, listToMap )
   else:
       return list( listToMap )

then you could map it:

mapProcces([str.lower,str.upper,str.title],"stackowerflow")

or you can simply replace every definitive separator with space and then split space.

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'
separ = "|,-,$".split(",")
secret_code_1 = [x if x not in separ else " " for x in secret_code_1]# replaces separators with empty chars
secret_code_1 = "".join(secret_code_1) #coverts list to a string
secret_code_1 = secret_code_1.split(" ") #it splited them to list
secret_code_1 = filter(None,secret_code_1) # filter empty chars ''
first,second,third,fourth,other = secret_code_1

And there you have it, your secret_code_1 is split and assigned to definitive amount of variables. Of course " " is used as declaration, you can use whatever you want, you can replace every separator with "someseparator" if you want and then split with "someseparator". You can also use str.replace function to make it clearer.

I hope this helps

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0

I think you need to provide more information of exactly what you're trying to achieve, and what the clear constraints are. For instance, how many times can $$ occur? Will there always be a | dividor? That kind of thing.

To answer your question broadly, an elegant pythonic way to do this is to use python's unpacking feature, combined with split. for example

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'

first_$$_part, last_$$_part = secret_code_1.split('$$')

By using this technique, in addition to simple if blocks, you should be able to write an elegant parser.

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0

If I understand it correctly, you want to be able to define your functions as if the parsed arguments are passed, but want to pass the unparsed code to the functions instead.

You can do that very similarly to the first solution you presented.

from functools import wraps

def parse_secret(f):
  @wraps(f)
  def wrapper(code):
    args = code.split('$$')[0].split('-')
    return f(*args)
  return wrapper

@parse_secret
def parse_code_1(a, b, c):
  a = a.split('|')[0]
  return (a,b,c)

@parse_secret
def parse_code_2(a, b):
  b = b.split('|')[1]
  return (a,b)

For the secret codes mentioned in the examples,

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'

print (parse_code_1(secret_code_1))
>> ('asdf', 'sdfg', 'wert')

secret_code_2 = 'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing'
print (parse_code_2(secret_code_2))
>> ('qwersdfg', 'er')
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0

I haven't understood anything of your question, neither your code, but maybe a simple way to do it is by regular expression?

import re

secret_code_1 = 'asdf|qwer-sdfg-wert$$otherthing'
secret_code_2 = 'qwersdfg-qw|er$$otherthing'

def parse_code(code):
    regex = re.search('([\w-]+)\|([\w-]+)\$\$([\w]+)', code)  # regular expression
    return regex.group(3), regex.group(1).split("-"), regex.group(2).split("-")

otherthing, first_group, second_group = parse_code(secret_code_2)

print(otherthing)  # otherthing, string
print(first_group)  # first group, list
print(second_group)  # second group, list

The output:

otherthing
['qwersdfg', 'qw']
['er']
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