2

How do I make a variable number of timed tasks run sequentially using JavaScript?

I'm working on a recreation of the classic electronic memory game Simon for a challenge at Free Code Camp. I'm using the Web Audio API to generate the sounds and I need to time them correctly.

I need to start a sound, wait for 420ms, stop the sound, then wait for 500ms before starting the next sound.

I can get it to work just fine with setTimeout when I only need to play a single sound, but I can't figure out how to make it wait to play the subsequent sounds.

Here's a subset of the code that shows the problem. It works fine with 1 sound, but when there's more than one it ends up playing all of them (except for the first?) at the same time:

var audioContext = new AudioContext();
var oscillator = null;

function playSound(frequency) {
  oscillator = audioContext.createOscillator();
  oscillator.type = 'square';
  oscillator.connect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator.frequency.value = frequency;
  oscillator.start();
}

function stopSound() {
  oscillator.stop();
  oscillator.disconnect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator = null;
}

var frequencies =  [329.628, 220, 277.183, 164.814];

var turn = 1;
var soundCounter = 0;

var duration = 0;
if (turn <= 5) {
  duration = 420;
} else if (turn <= 13) {
  duration = 320;
} else {
  duration = 220;
}

for (var i = 0; i < turn; i++) {
  var freqId = Math.floor(Math.random() * frequencies.length);
  var frequency = frequencies[freqId];
  playSound(frequency);
  setTimeout(function() { stopSound(); }, duration);
}

4
  • 1
  • 1
    @user1032531 That's about as clear as mud... It looks like an implementation of Javascript callbacks in the C programming language. While I suspect callbacks are involved in a solution to my problem, I think figuring out the Application Binary Interface and writing part of the code in C would probably be overkill.
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:15
  • You need to set it up so that the timeout function that calls stopSound() for each then starts the next one, etc. A bit of advice: tame your callback hell a bit by using Promises. Dec 29, 2016 at 0:38
  • @LeeDanielCrocker I've been looking carefully at Promises, but it just looks an alternative to callbacks. It works great when the number of tasks is fixed in the code, but I can't figure out how to implement it with a variable number of tasks.
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:49

4 Answers 4

2

You need to use a recursive function for this. Here is a working example:

var audioContext = new AudioContext();
var oscillator = null;

function playSound(frequency) {
  oscillator = audioContext.createOscillator();
  oscillator.type = 'square';
  oscillator.connect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator.frequency.value = frequency;
  oscillator.start();
}

function stopSound() {
  oscillator.stop();
  oscillator.disconnect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator = null;
}

var frequencies =  [329.628, 220, 277.183, 164.814];

var turn = 5;
var soundCounter = 0;

var duration = 0;
if (turn <= 5) {
  duration = 420;
} else if (turn <= 13) {
  duration = 320;
} else {
  duration = 220;
}

playSeq();
function playSeq(i) {
  if (!i) i = 0;
  var freqId = Math.floor(Math.random() * frequencies.length);
  var frequency = frequencies[freqId];
  playSound(frequency);
  setTimeout(function() {
    stopSound();
    i++;
    if (i < turn) playSeq(i);
  }, duration);
}

A for loop doesn't work here since the loop will continue to the next iteration without waiting for the setTimeout callback to be executed. A simple example:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
  // Schedules the code to run in the future:
  setTimeout(function () { console.log('Hi'); }, 2);
  // Continues to the next line:
  console.log(i);
  // Continues to the next iteration of the loop...
}

By using a recursive function, the js engine will wait until the setTimeout code is finished to continue with the next iteration.

Anytime you use setTimeout or setInterval, you cannot rely on JS loops if you want to wait for the Timeouts to finish, you must use a recursive function.

2
  • 1
    Perfect! But you left one very small thing out. There's no 500ms pause between sounds. That was easy to fix by nesting another setTimeout inside of the one that fires the recursive call to playSeq. I tried it out at CodePen and it works great. I always seem to get tripped up by recursive solutions. Thank you.
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:41
  • @Vince I thought you might want a pause between sounds, but I thought you could figure that out yourself. ;)
    – RyanZim
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:47
1

You need asynchronous loops, but also you would need to store the generated notes, so you can repeat them for your game.

I would also suggest using a promise, so you know when the play-back has finished.

Here is a working snippet (turn down your volume first):

var audioContext = new AudioContext();
var oscillator = null;

function playSound(frequency) {
  oscillator = audioContext.createOscillator();
  oscillator.type = 'square';
  oscillator.connect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator.frequency.value = frequency;
  oscillator.start();
}

function stopSound() {
  oscillator.stop();
  oscillator.disconnect(audioContext.destination);
  oscillator = null;
}

var frequencies =  [329.628, 220, 277.183, 164.814];
// You need to store the tones that were already generated, so
// the sequence remains the same once generated:
var sequence = [];

function playTurn(turn) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve) {
        // First complete the sequence:
        while (sequence.length < turn) {
            sequence.push(Math.floor(Math.random() * frequencies.length));
        }    

        var duration = turn <=  5 ? 420
                     : turn <= 13 ? 320
                     :              220;

        (function loop(i) {
            if (i >= sequence.length) return resolve();
            playSound(frequencies[sequence[i]]);
            setTimeout(stopSound, duration);
            setTimeout(loop.bind(null,i+1), duration*2.2);
        })(0);
    });
}

// Generate and play 4 notes:
playTurn(4).then(function() {
    alert('done');
});

4
  • Note that this solution relies on the existence of native Promise caniuse.com/#feat=promises
    – RyanZim
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:49
  • Indeed. Promise was introduced in EcmaScript2015. All major browsers support it, except Internet Explorer, which is discontinued anyway in favour of Edge.
    – trincot
    Dec 29, 2016 at 0:50
  • This is also an excellent solution. I've been looking at Promises, but I still have a lot to learn before I fully understand them. This one's a little more complex, but it's still a recursive solution, right? .bind allows arguments in the setTimeout function, which is very cool. When you return a call to resolve() from the loop function, I don't quite get what's happening. It's clear that it'll stop playing notes from the sequence, but what does it return / call? resolve is undefined, isn't it?
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 1:12
  • (1) .bind creates a new function which will pass the provided i+1 as argument when it gets called by the timer event. It is just a shorter syntax than creating an in-place anonymous function that does nothing else than calling the recursive function. (2) As long as resolve is within scope, you can call it. It does not matter how nested you are in functions, or whether you arrived in that scope in an asynchronous way, as long as it is in scope, you can call it. Calling resolve fulfils the promise you created. The resolve function is provided by the promise internals.
    – trincot
    Dec 29, 2016 at 8:31
1

Here's how I might do it (in ES6, you may have to translate/load a promise library, etc.):

// Using playSound(), stopSound() from question

let furElise = [
    [ 329.63, 200 ],
    [ 311.13, 200 ],
    [ 329.63, 200 ],
    [ 311.13, 200 ],
    [ 329.63, 200 ],
    [ 246.94, 200 ],
    [ 293.66, 200 ],
    [ 261.63, 200 ],
    [ 220.00, 400 ]
];

function playNote(pitch, duration) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        playSound(pitch);
        setTimeout(() => {
            stopSound();
            resolve(true);
        }, duration);
    });
}

function playTune(notes) {
    if (notes.length > 0) {
        playNote(notes[0][0], notes[0][1]).then(() => {
            playTune(notes.slice(1));
        });
    }
}

playTune(furElise);
4
  • This a very clean looking solution and as far as I can tell all of the ES6 features you're using are well supported (Can I use... Promises, let, Arrow functions). I had to re-read slice to understand how you change notes. I'm starting to understand why you call resolve() without ever defining it after reading the MDN page for the 50th time (it usually takes me about 100 reads :( ) Thank you.
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 4:25
  • The argument to the Promise constructor is a function that takes two arguments--those arguments are filled in with the resolve and reject functions. A simple one like this never fails, so I don't need to call reject () anywhere. Dec 29, 2016 at 4:32
  • I read that at the MDN page, but never understood where those resolve and reject functions are defined or what they do. I thought I had to define them myself, but I guess they're just part of the Promise object and passed as the arguments to the executor method? I understand what happens to resolve's argument if it's an object with a then method, but what happens to the value otherwise? I don't expect you to keep answering my questions. I really appreciate what you've told me so far. I just need to keep reading and finding examples until it sinks in. Thank you.
    – Vince
    Dec 29, 2016 at 4:53
  • The fact that JavaScript is a functional language sneaks up on people: it looks superficially more like C or Java than LISP, but LISP-y methods like iterating a list with a recursive function and car/cdr, passing functions and partial-applications of functions around as objects, work just fine. Dec 29, 2016 at 20:41
0

(Posted solution on behalf of the question author to move it to the answer space).

I have finished this!

I couldn't have completed this without the excellent answers provided by @RyanZim, @trincot, and @lee-daniel-crocker. None of the answers were directly usable with copy & paste and that's a good thing because I'm supposed to be learning something :D I learned from and used bits from all the answers.

Here is the code:

/* jshint esversion: 6 */
var Game = function() {
  var audioContext = new window.AudioContext();
  var oscillator = null;
  var gainNode = null;
  var winner = false;

  var that = this;
  this.power = false;
  this.started = false;
  this.playerTurn = false;
  this.strictMode = false;
  this.sequence = [];
  this.playerSequence = [];
  this.turn = 0;

  var winningSong = [];
  winningSong.push($('.button.red').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.yellow').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.blue').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.green').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.green').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.green').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.red').get(0));
  winningSong.push($('.button.yellow').get(0));

  var playSound = function(frequency) {
    if (!that.power || !that.started || oscillator !== null) return false;
    gainNode = audioContext.createGain();
    oscillator = audioContext.createOscillator();
    oscillator.type = 'square';
    oscillator.frequency.value = frequency;

    oscillator.connect(gainNode);
    gainNode.connect(audioContext.destination);

    gainNode.gain.value = 0.1;

    oscillator.start();
  };

  var stopSound = function() {
    if (!oscillator || !gainNode) return false;
    oscillator.stop();
    gainNode.disconnect(audioContext.destination);

    oscillator = null;
    gainNode = null;
  };

  var randomButton = function() {
    var $buttons = $('.button');

    var buttonNumber = Math.floor(Math.random() * $buttons.length);
    return $buttons[buttonNumber];
  };

  var playTone = function(frequency, duration) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      playSound(frequency);
      setTimeout(() => {
        stopSound();
        resolve(true);
      }, duration);
    });
  };

  var playSequence = function(buttons) {
    if (buttons.length === 0) {
      that.playerTurn = true;
      if (winner) {
        that.start();
      }
      return that.playerTurn;
    }

    // Assign the duration of the tone based on how many
    // turns we've already played.
    // ref: http://www.waitingforfriday.com/?p=586#Sound_frequencies_and_timing
    var duration = that.sequence.length <= 5  ? 420
                 : that.sequence.length <= 13 ? 320
                 :                              220;

    if (winner) {
      duration = 100;
    }

    var button = buttons[0];
    if (!winner) {
      if (buttons.length === that.sequence.length) console.log('+++++');
      console.log((that.sequence.length - buttons.length) + ':' + $(button).data('color'));
      if (buttons.length === 1) console.log('-----');
    }

    that.activateButton(button);

    var frequency = $(button).data('frequency');
    playTone(frequency, duration).then(() => {
      that.deactivateButton(button);
      playSequence(buttons.slice(1));
    });
  };

  var takeTurn = function() {
    if ( that.turn === 20 ) {
      winner = true;
      playSequence(winningSong);
      return true;
    }
    that.turn++;

    // Add a new button to the sequence.
    that.sequence.push(randomButton());

    // If necessary, prepend the turn number with a zero
    // before updating the display.
    var displayString = that.turn < 10 ? '0' + that.turn : '' + that.turn;
    $('.display').html(displayString);

    playSequence(that.sequence);
  };

  this.activateButton = function(button) {
    // If the game hasn't been turned on or started, don't do
    // anything.
    if (!that.power || !that.started) return false;

    // Create a jQuery object from the DOM element reference.
    var $button = $(button);

    // Light up the active button.
    $button.addClass('active');
  };

  this.deactivateButton = function(e) {
    var $button = $(e.target || e);
    stopSound();
    $button.removeClass('active');

    if (that.playerTurn && that.playerSequence.length === that.sequence.length) {
      that.playerTurn = false;
      that.playerSequence = [];
      setTimeout(takeTurn, 500);
    }
  };

  this.pressButton = function(e) {
    if (!that.power || !that.started || !that.playerTurn) return false;

    // Add the pressed button to the player's button sequence.
    that.playerSequence.push(e.target);
    that.activateButton(e.target);

    playSound($(e.target).data('frequency'));

    // Check if the player's button matches the computer's
    // button at the same position in the sequence.
    var playerButton = e.target;
    var computerButton = that.sequence[that.playerSequence.length - 1];

    // If the player's button doesn't match, play the
    // failure sound and end the game.
    // ref: http://www.waitingforfriday.com/?p=586#Sound_frequencies_and_timing
    if (playerButton !== computerButton) {
      that.playerTurn = false;
      that.playerSequence = [];
      setTimeout(function() {
        that.deactivateButton(e.target);
        stopSound();
        playSound(42);
        if (that.strictMode) {
          that.started = false;
          setTimeout(stopSound, 1500);
        } else {
          setTimeout(function() {
            stopSound();
            playSequence(that.sequence);
          }, 500);
        }
      }, 200);
    }
  };

  this.start = function() {
    if (!that.power) return false;
    winner = false;
    that.started = true;
    that.turn = 0;
    $('.display').html('00');
    that.sequence = [];
    that.playerSequence = [];
    takeTurn();
  };

  this.toggleStrict = function() {
    if (!that.power) return false;
    that.strictMode = !that.strictMode;
    $('.strict').toggleClass('on');
  }
};

$(function() {
  // Assign the tone frequency based on the button's color.
  $('div.button.green').data('frequency', '329.628');
  $('div.button.red').data('frequency', '220');
  $('div.button.yellow').data('frequency', '277.183');
  $('div.button.blue').data('frequency', '164.814');

  /*
  // From http://www.waitingforfriday.com/?p=586#Sound_frequencies_and_timing
  $buttons.filter('.green').data('frequency', '415');
  $buttons.filter('.red').data('frequency', '310');
  $buttons.filter('.yellow').data('frequency', '252');
  $buttons.filter('.blue').data('frequency', '209');

  // From Wikipedia: "Simon (game)"
  $buttons.filter('.green').data('frequency', '659.255');
  $buttons.filter('.red').data('frequency', '440');
  $buttons.filter('.yellow').data('frequency', '277.18');
  $buttons.filter('.blue').data('frequency', '329.628');

  // From the Free Code Camp forums:
  https://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/better-audiocontext-frequencies-for-simon/69483/2?u=vaggrippino
  */

  var $buttons = $('div.button');

  var game = new Game();
  $buttons.on('mousedown', game.pressButton);
  $buttons.on('mouseup mouseleave', game.deactivateButton);

  $('.power .switch').on('click', function() {
    game.power = !game.power;
    $('.power .switch').toggleClass('on');
    $('.display').html(game.power ? '--' : '');
  });

  $('.start').on('click',  game.start);
  $('.strict').on('click', game.toggleStrict);
});

http://codepen.io/VAggrippino/pen/WoBQXR

The code is sloppy in some places, but it works and I'd rather move on than perfect it right now.

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