32

As the questions states, how do I achieve this?

If I have a code like this:

let a = "29";
for c in a.chars() {
    println!("{}", c as u32);
}

What I obtain is the unicode codepoints for 2 and 9:

  • 50
  • 57

What I want is to parse those characters into the actual numbers.

0

2 Answers 2

42

char::to_digit(radix) does that. radix denotes the "base", i.e. 10 for the decimal system, 16 for hex, etc.:

let a = "29";
for c in a.chars() {
    println!("{:?}", c.to_digit(10));
}

It returns an Option, so you need to unwrap() it, or better: expect("that's no number!"). You can read more about proper error handling in the appropriate chapter of the Rust book.

8
  • 2
    Thank you, I feel like the dumbest user in SO. I think one of the main problems I'm having in learning Rust, is navigating the documentation. If you google "Rust Char", you get the documentation for the module: link which does not include the method you mention. I see now that it is because it's part of the type and not the module, it just didn't seem obvious froms the docs to "look there". </rant> Thanks again!
    – Dash83
    Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:24
  • 2
    in turn, as a rust beginner myself, this was the first rust question I could answer :-) As for docs: I'm using Dash for mac, which is just a wrapper around the docs you linked but somehow I find the things faster there than on the web (e.g. searching for char leads you to the primitive type and not to the module)
    – hansaplast
    Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:31
  • Had not heard of dash before (funny, given my username). You just blew my mind. Thank you, kind stranger.
    – Dash83
    Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:34
  • 1
    @hansaplast: Note that you can have the docs as local html pages, which eliminates network round-trips... and nice first answer, short, to the point, and with nice tips for the future! Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:35
  • 1
    @Dash83: don't feel bad, that's what we're here for! I hope the two of you enjoy getting into Rust so far! Feel free to join the SO Rust chat if you want to talk about rusty stuff! :) Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:36
15

Well, you can always use the following hacky solution:

fn main() {
    let a = "29";
    for c in a.chars() {
        println!("{}", c as u32 - 48);
    }
}

ASCII digits are encoded with values from 48 to 57, so when you have a string containing characters 2 and 9 and attempt to interpret them as integers, you get 50 and 57. To get their expected values you just need to subtract 48 from them.

1
  • The answer by @hansaplast is just what I was looking for. Thanks though.
    – Dash83
    Commented Dec 29, 2016 at 13:27

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